P h y s I c a L r e V i e w L e t t e r s



Yüklə 90,15 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix24.12.2017
ölçüsü90,15 Kb.
#17630


V

OLUME


85, N

UMBER


3

P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S

17 J

ULY


2000

Anharmonic Lattice Dynamics in Germanium Measured with Ultrafast X-Ray Diffraction

A. Cavalleri,

1,

* C. W. Siders,



1,

F. L. H. Brown,



1

D. M. Leitner,

1,



C. Tóth,



2

J. A. Squier,

3

C. P. J. Barty,



4

and K. R. Wilson

1

1

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0339



2

Institute for Nonlinear Science, The University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0339

3

Department of Electrical Engineering, The University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0339

4

Department of Applied Mechanics and Engineering Sciences, The University of California San Diego,

La Jolla, California 92093-0339

K. Sokolowski-Tinten,

5

M. Horn von Hoegen,



5

and D. von der Linde

5

5

Institut f ür Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Universität Essen, D-45117 Essen, Germany



M. Kammler

6

6



Institut f ür Festkörperphysik, Universität Hannover, D-30167 Hannover, Germany

(

Received 17 December 1999



)

Damping of impulsively generated coherent acoustic oscillations in a femtosecond laser-heated thin

germanium film is measured as a function of fluence by means of ultrafast x-ray diffraction. By simul-

taneously measuring picosecond strain dynamics in the film and in the unexcited silicon substrate, we

separate anharmonic damping from acoustic transmission through the buried interface. The measured

damping rate and its dependence on the calculated temperature of the thermal bath is consistent with es-

timated four-body, elastic dephasing times

͑T

2

͒ for 7-GHz longitudinal acoustic phonons in germanium.



PACS numbers: 63.20.Ry, 42.65.Re, 61.10.Nz

In semiconductors, the response to impulsive, interband

optical excitation generally proceeds through intraband re-

laxation of hot carriers via phonon emission, radiative and

nonradiative recombination, vibrational acoustic transport

into the bulk or across interfaces, and eventual thermal-

ization of the phonon modes via lattice anharmonicity [1].

While the processes involving charge carriers and Raman-

active optical phonons have been extensively characterized

with optical methods [1], the ultimate steps of transport

and thermalization of nonequilibrium acoustic lattice vi-

brations have remained largely undetected. Moreover, an-

harmonic lattice effects are of general interest because they

are responsible for many other common processes in the

solid state, such as thermal expansion, volume-dependent

elastic constants, and temperature dependent thermal con-

ductivity in solids [2].

Yet, the measurement of non-

Raman-active coherent acoustic phonons is demanding and

has been indirectly achieved only at surfaces [3,4]. By

combining the temporal resolution of ultrafast laser spec-

troscopy [5] with the structural sensitivity of x-ray scat-

tering [6], a number of direct studies [7 – 13] of atomic

motion deep within the bulk of matter have been recently

achieved. In this paper, we report on ultrafast x-ray mea-

surements of strain oscillations in an impulsively heated

germanium film. Excitation-dependent damping times and

vibrational transport across a buried interface are simulta-

neously measured, thereby identifying individual coherent

phonon decay mechanisms.

In our experiment, multiterawatt, femtosecond laser

pulses [14] were focused onto a moving copper wire to

produce ultrafast x-ray bursts [15] at 20 Hz. The emitted

x rays, consisting of spin-orbit split 8-keV

͑1.54 Å͒

Cu-K

a1

and Cu-K



a2

lines, were diffracted by the sample,

a 400-nm-thick, crystalline (111) germanium film grown

on bulk (111) silicon by surfactant-mediated heteroepitaxy

[16]. After symmetric Bragg diffraction, the x rays were

recorded with a solid state area detector [x-ray charge-

coupled device (CCD)]. The two K

a

doublets where



diffracted at two distinct Bragg angles (germanium 13.6

±

,



silicon 14.2

±

) resulting from different lattice constants of



the two diamondlike materials (germanium 5.65 Å, silicon

5.43 Å). The area of the sample probed by the x rays was

illuminated by an 800-nm wavelength, 30-fs laser pulse

with fluence of 40 mJ

͞cm

2

. By simultaneously probing



the film and the substrate, we could measure the strain

dynamics in both components of the structure. Multishot

degradation at the very surface was avoided by translating

the sample after exposure to a few hundred pulses.

Typical x-ray probe lines, diffracted at a pump-probe

time delay of 100 ps, are shown in Fig. 1. In the Ge film

a full shift of the two nonbroadened lines indicates ho-

mogeneous expansion over its entire thickness. As the

sample was illuminated with a Gaussian intensity profile,

fluence resolved measurements of the time-dependent cen-

troid shifts (averaged over the K

a1

and K



a2

positions)

could be easily made and are displayed in Fig. 2 for four

regions of the photoexcited region (A D as indicated in

Fig. 1). The displayed experimental points represent the

average deviation from the static diffraction angle of the



K

a1

and K



a2

for four different fluences [

͑A͒ 40 mJ͞cm

2

,



͑B͒ 32 mJ͞cm

2

,



͑C͒ 25 mJ͞cm

2

,



͑D͒ 15 mJ͞cm

2

]. Typi-



cal values of the peak strain of

ϳ0.05% 0.1% correspond

586

0031-9007



͞00͞85(3)͞586(4)$15.00

© 2000 The American Physical Society




V

OLUME


85, N

UMBER


3

P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S

17 J

ULY


2000

FIG. 1.


Experimentally measured diffraction curves from the

photopumped germanium film and the silicon substrate for a

100 ps pump-probe delay. The horizontal axis is the diffraction

angle and the vertical is the position on the crystal. The regions

of the samples labeled as A D represent the positions where

fluence and time resolved centroid positions were measured.

to an increase in the distance between lattice planes of

about 150 – 300 fm and result in shifts of the Bragg angle

that range between 225 and 250 arcsec. The peak of

the measured compressions, representing a spatial aver-

age over 2.6-mm probed depth in silicon, correspond to

20 – 40 fm average change in lattice spacing (i.e., by a few

nuclear diameters). Because of better crystalline quality of

the bulk substrate, the silicon measurement was about 43

more sensitive than that of the germanium film. Approxi-

mately 75 ps after photoexcitation, expansion of the ger-

manium lattice reaches its peak value [Fig. 2(a)]. Damped

oscillations were observed at longer time delays, indica-

tive of periodic expansion and compression of the film.

Diffraction from the silicon substrate evidenced centroid

shifts toward higher angles, indicating compression simul-

taneous with Ge-film expansion [Fig. 2(b)].

Two fluence dependent effects are immediately appar-

ent in the Ge data. First, we observed a fluence-dependent

delay on the onset of expansion, becoming shorter at

higher excitation level. Second, fluence-dependent life-

times of coherent oscillations in germanium were clearly

observable.

Recently, a similar effect has been observed under dif-

ferent experimental conditions [10]. In Ref. [10], a re-

versible, nonthermal phase transition was evidenced from

strongly overdamped acoustic oscillations in InSb, with re-

ported strain near the Lindemann criterion

͑ϳ10%͒. In our

experiment, the equilibrium lattice is coherently strained

by as little as 0.1%. Second, unlike the case of ultrafast

melting [11], the total diffraction efficiency in the 111 di-

rection (integrated over the whole Ge-rocking curve) oscil-

lates around the static value but never decreases, indicating

that no significant loss of order is taking place. Finally, as

shown below, after the coherent oscillations are damped,

we can quantitatively model our data for all fluences by

FIG. 2.

Time dependent shift of the angular centroid position,



for (a) 400-nm germanium film, (b) silicon bulk. Thin lines:

theoretically calculated centroid shifts after heating of the ger-

manium film with the calculated strain profile. A fully harmonic

model for a perfect crystal and a fluence-independent heating

time of 10 ps is assumed. Thick lines: (a) phenomenological

fits to the germanium diffraction centroid, yielding total damp-

ing times

͑1͞G


tot

͒ of 44 6 20 ps (A), 62 6 15 ps (B), 75 6

12 ps (C), 109 6 10 ps (D). (b) Expected silicon response us-

ing heating and damping times from the germanium data.

assuming a hot crystalline germanium cooling by thermal

diffusion into the silicon substrate. Therefore our results

cannot be explained with a phase transition.

Our interpretation proceeds along the following lines.

The optical pump pulse excites carriers in germanium over

its absorption depth (200 nm), with initial peak surface

density of

ϳ10


21

cm

23



, with negligible photoexcitation of

the substrate. The absorption depth is largely independent

on the excitation fluence, due to the high density of states

587



V

OLUME


85, N

UMBER


3

P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S

17 J

ULY


2000

available for interband excitation and to rapid electron-

hole thermalization, depleting the optically coupled states

already during absorption of the pump pulse. While effi-

cient ambipolar diffusion homogeneously distributes the

hot carriers over the entire film within a few picoseconds

[17], equilibration with the lattice takes place through a

combination of nonradiative Auger recombination and

intraband relaxation [18]. The 430-meV potential barrier

at the interface between germanium

͑E

g

෇ 0.67 eV͒ and

silicon

͑E



g

෇ 1.1 eV͒ is significantly higher than the

quasi-Fermi-levels of the relaxed electrons and holes,

confining the carriers at all times and leaving the silicon

substrate unexcited. Thus, the diffracted Ge lines shift

fully, with virtually no broadening and no significant

negative strain is generated in the silicon. The observed

delays in the onset of expansion are in good agreement

with delayed heating times of 50 ps

͑D͒, 15 ps ͑C͒, 5 ps

͑B͒, and 3 ps ͑A͒, calculated using available values for

germanium Auger recombination rates [19].

Homogeneous impulsive heating starts the coherent

film vibration with a period of 2d

͞c

L

ഠ 150 ps (

400 nm 6 20 nm is the film thickness and c

L

෇ 5400 m͞

sec is the longitudinal speed of sound in germanium) with

the unexcited silicon substrate acting as vibrational energy

sink. In a harmonic approximation and assuming a perfect

crystal, decay of the coherent vibration results only from

transmission of acoustic pulses into the substrate.

In

a real crystal, however, a variety of additional effects,



ranging from defect and surface scattering to phonon-

phonon scattering, result in more rapid damping of the

coherent oscillations. Importantly, while all the defect-

mediated scattering mechanisms are independent of the

degree of excitation of the lattice, anharmonic interactions

between the normal modes of the crystal depend upon the

population of individual phonon modes and thus on the

temperature of the solid [20]. Therefore, the observed

fluence dependent damping is a direct indication of lattice

anharmonicity.

To estimate the relative contributions of the various

mechanisms to the measured damping rate

͑G

tot


͒, we first

compare the data to a fully harmonic model for a perfect

crystal with no defects and assuming complete acoustic

matching between the film and the substrate [Fig. 2]. The

initial stress distribution was numerically calculated by

solving two differential equations for carrier and lattice

temperature [21], taking into account screened Auger re-

combination [22] and density-dependent carrier diffusion

[17]. The one-dimensional elastic equation [23,24] was

then numerically solved in the two-layer system starting

from the calculated stress distribution. Thermal diffusion,

significant at the sharp interface between hot germanium

and cold silicon, was included in the model. The expected

time-dependent x-ray diffraction pattern was calculated

using dynamic diffraction theory [25]. The model predicts

fluence-independent damping

͑G

harm


͒, originating from

the transmission of the coherent vibrations into the sub-

strate. The long lived coherent oscillations measured at

the lowest fluence follow the calculated curve very closely,

demonstrating that defect and surface scattering play a

minor role in our sample, and that only acoustic trans-

mission should be taken into account among the fluence-

independent processes. As the laser fluence is increased

and anharmonicity becomes significant, the data start to

deviate from the model. Total damping rates

͑G

tot


͒ were

fitted to the germanium data using a phenomenological

functional form for damped coherent oscillations super-

imposed on a delayed thermal response. In the substrate,

while the harmonic model is in reasonable agreement with

the data for low excitation, inclusion of the fitted damping

times yields better matching in the higher fluence range.

No clear evidence for fluence-dependent delay in the

onset of compression can be observed in the data, prob-

ably because of the relatively large uncertainty in the

measurement.

The damping rate from acoustic transmission (dominant

at low fluence) was subtracted from the fitted rates,

yielding the fluence-dependent component of the damping

͑G

anh


͒, displayed in Fig. 3. Two different mechanisms

can explain the anharmonic damping of the 7-GHz

oscillations:

inelastic collisions with thermally popu-

lated phonons, causing decay of the population of the

coherent mode (T

1

processes) [25] and energy conserving



collisions, leading to mutual decoherence between the

individual phonons (T

2

processes). Both processes exhibit



a linear dependence on temperature for a classical thermal

bath [26], consistent with our observation. The former,



T

1

process, originates largely from three-body collisions



arising from cubic anharmonicity. For a 7-GHz phonon,

however, T

1

processes are expected to occur at a rate of



ϳ10

25

psec



21

, 3 orders of magnitude slower than the

measured decay of the oscillations [26].

On the other

hand, four-body elastic dephasing

͑T

2

͒ processes [27] can



be significantly faster. The origin of pure dephasing lies

in quartic anharmonic coupling, modulating the frequency

of the 7-GHz mode and causing loss of coherence. This

effect can occur on time scales that are much faster

than inelastic collisions and energy flow out of this very

mode.


By introducing reasonable four-body terms for

the temperature range of our experiment, we find [27]



T

21

2



of order 0.01 psec

21

, which is consistent with our



measurement.

In conclusion, we have measured ultrafast, acoustic

phonon dynamics in a germanium/silicon layered struc-

ture, measuring atomic vibrations with 10-fm resolution,

using ultrafast x-ray diffraction.

The fluence depen-

dence of the oscillations directly yields the temperature-

dependent decoherence rates resulting from anharmonic

lattice dynamics within the germanium film. We attribute

the observed damping to T

2

processes, which originate



largely from four-body interactions that cause decoherence

in the evolution of the mode. Ultrafast x-ray diffraction

allows direct measurement of coherent acoustic excita-

tions before their thermalization with the environment,

thereby making experiments of nonequilibrium ballistic

588



V

OLUME


85, N

UMBER


3

P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S

17 J

ULY


2000

FIG. 3.


Anharmonic damping rates as a function of calculated

temperature in germanium. The anharmonic damping rates are

calculated by subtracting the low fluence, harmonic damping

rates from the total damping rates. The vertical error bars have

been determined from the uncertainty on the fitted value. The

error bars on the calculated temperature of the crystal (horizon-

tal) originate from the uncertainty on the optical constants of the

sample during irradiation, on laser fluence variations, and on the

thermalization time of the thermal bath. Dashed line: linear fit

to the data.

heat transport possible. Anharmonic effects of strongly

driven or shocked crystals and of solids close to phase

transitions and critical points could also be examined,

with both fundamental and technological ramifications.

K. S. T. gratefully acknowledges financial support by the

Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. The authors are grate-

ful to H. J. Maris for critical discussion.

*To whom correspondence should be addressed.

Email address: acavalleri@ucsd.edu

Present address: School of Optics/CREOL, University of



Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816.

Present address: Department of Chemistry, University of



Nevada, Reno, NV 89557.

[1] J. Shah, Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Semiconductors and



Semiconductor Heterostructures (Springer, Berlin, 1996).

[2] N. W. Ashcroft and N. D. Mermin, Solid State Physics

(Saunders College Publishing, Fort Worth, 1976).

[3] J. J. Baumberg, D. A. Williams, and K. Köhler, Phys. Rev.

Lett. 78

,

3358 (1997).



[4] C. Thomsen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 53

,

989 (1985).



[5] C. V. Shank, Science 233

,

1276 (1986).



[6] M. Von Laue, Ann. Phys. (Leipzig) 41

,

989 (1913); W. L.



Bragg, P. R. Soc. London 89

,

248 (1913).



[7] C. Rischel et al., Nature (London) 390

,

490 (1997).



[8] C. Rose-Petruck et al., Nature (London) 398

,

310 (1999).



[9] A. H. Chin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 83

,

336 (1999).



[10] A. M. Lindenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84

,

111 (2000).



[11] C. W. Siders et al., Science 286

,

1340 (1999).



[12] A. Rousse et al., in Technical Digest of the Quantum Elec-

tronics and Laser Conference ’99, Baltimore, 1999 (Optical

Society of America, Washington, DC, 1999), p. 152.

[13] J. Larsson et al., Appl. Phys. A 66

,

587 (1998).



[14] C. P. J. Barty et al., Opt. Lett. 21

,

668 (1996).



[15] A. Rousse et al., Phys. Rev. E 50

,

2200 (1994).



[16] M. Horn von Hoegen, Appl. Phys. A 59

,

503 (1994).



[17] By measuring the generation and propagation of short

acoustic pulses in a bulk germanium crystal, we confirmed

that efficient carrier diffusion causes homogeneous heating

of the germanium film. Although the optical penetration

depth is 200 nm, we measured heat deposition into the

bulk lattice over more than 1 mm in less than 20 ps, in-

dicating that heat is initially transferred through rapid car-

rier diffusion. The inferred ultrafast heat transfer velocities

are higher than 5 3 10

6

cm



͞sec, consistent with measured

high-density carrier diffusion rates of germanium [J. Young

and H. M. van Driel, Phys. Rev. B 26

,

2147 (1982)] and



similar to what was already reported for bulk metals [S. D.

Brorson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 59

,

1962 (1987)].



[18] M. C. Downer and C. V. Shank, Phys. Rev. Lett. 56

,

761



(1986).

[19] D. H. Auston, C. V. Shank, and P. LeFur, Phys. Rev. Lett.



35

,

1022 (1975).



[20] B. K. Ridley, Quantum Processes in Semiconductors

(Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1993).

[21] S. I. Anisimov, B. L. Kapeliovich, and T. L. Perelman,

Zhurnal Eksperimental’noi i Teoreticheskoi Fiziki 66

,

776


(1974).

[22] D. H. Auston and C. V. Shank, Phys. Rev. Lett. 32

,

1120


(1974); E. Yoffa, Phys. Rev. B 21

,

2415 (1980).



[23] C. Thomsen, H. T. Grahn, H. J. Maris, and J. Tauc, Phys.

Rev. B 34

,

4129 (1986).



[24] The value of the screening parameter for Auger recombi-

nation and of the time- and density-dependent carrier dif-

fusion rate were known only from theoretical estimates

(Ref. [22]), but the results of our simulations were not

critically dependent on either parameter. The calculated

peak strain/centroid shift was estimated with 65% accu-

racy, mostly determined by the fluctuations of the laser

energy.


[25] S. Takagi, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 26

,

1239 (1969); D. Taupin,



Bull. Soc. Fr. Mineral. Cristallogr. 87

,

469 (1964).



[26] S. Tamura and H. J. Maris, Phys. Rev. B 51

,

2857 (1995);



H. J. Maris (private communication).

[27] T

21

2

ഠ p͞16 ¯h



2

P

i

w

2

11ii



n

i

͑n



i

1 1


͒͞g

i

(Ref. [28]), where

w

11ii



is the quartic coupling coefficient between the 7-GHz

mode (mode 1) and bath mode in



i

is the average number

of phonons in mode i, and g

i

is T

21

1

of mode i, which we



take to be of the order of 10

23

psec



21

[Ref. (26)]. To esti-

mate w

11ii



, we take the result for a one-dimensional chain,

where w


11ii

ϳ p ¯h

2

v

1



v

i

͑͞ka

2

͒, where is the spring con-



stant and is the lattice spacing [29], for temperatures

around 500 K. We find T

21

2

to be



ϳ10

22

psec



21

. Note


that, for experimentally relevant temperatures, since n

i

and


g

i

vary linearly with temperature, so does T

21

2

.



[28] D. W. Oxtoby, Adv. Chem. Phys. 40

,

1 (1979); A. Stuche-



brukhov, S. Ionov, and V. Letokhov, J. Phys. Chem. 93

,

5357 (1989).



[29] R. E. Peierls, Quantum Theory of Solids (Clarendon Press,

Oxford, 1955).



589

Yüklə 90,15 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə