Presenters



Yüklə 78,22 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix08.03.2018
ölçüsü78,22 Kb.
#30937


Michigan Geographic Alliance                   Aksum: No Questions 

2007 


 

 

Aksum: No Questions 



 

Authors: 

Cindy Bloom (cindyLNB@aol.com)  

Kim Adams (candkadams@aol.com) 

 

Lesson Overview: Students will map the rise 

and fall of an ancient African empire and 

explain factors contributing to these. 



 

Essential Questions: 

 



What is the difference between a 

kingdom, civilization, and empire? 

 

What factors can cause the rise and 



fall of a civilization? 

 

Objectives: Students will: 

 



Describe the components of a 

kingdom, civilization, and empire 

 

Describe the factors that can 



contribute to the fall of a 

kingdom/civilization/empire 

 

Create a timeline of Aksum events 



 

Map the rise and fall of Aksum 



 

Subject/Grade Level: World 

History/Geography, 6-12 

 

Duration:  1-2 class periods 

 

Student Materials:  Colored pencils, 

Student worksheets (timeline 

activity mapping activity), 

student atlases 

Map of NE Africa/SW Asia 

 

Teacher Materials: Teacher background 

notes 


 

 

 



 

 

 



References:   

 



CIA Factbook, 

www.historyteacher.net

archeology.about.com/od/ethiopia/Et



hiopian_Culture_History_and_Arche

ology.htm 

 

 

 



 

 

 

Michigan High School Content Expectations 

World History and Geography 



4.3.1 - Africa to 1500 - Describe the diverse 

characteristics of early African societies and the 

significant changes in African society by 

comparing and contrasting at least two of the 

major state/civilizations of East, South, and 

West Africa in terms of environmental 

economic, religious, political, and social 

structures. 

 

National Geography Standards: 

Standard 11: The patterns and networks of 

economic interdependence on Earth’s surface  

 

National World History Standards: 

Explain the connections between maritime trade 

and the power of the Kingdom of Aksum in 

Northeast Africa. 

 

Modes of Spatial/Temporal Thinking:  

Region: Identify groups of places that are close 

to each other and have similar conditions and 

connections. 

Comparison: Compare maps from different 

times, describe changes in the extent of 

something and predict possible future spread or 

shrinkage 




Michigan Geographic Alliance                   Aksum: No Questions 

2007 


 

 

Lesson Procedure 



 

1.

 



Warm-up – What do you know about Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Djibouti? (Use Teacher 

Background to discuss this area in Africa) 

2.

 

Vocabulary Review



a.

 

Kingdom: Area ruled by an inherited ruler, often a king or queen 

b.

 

Civilization: A society that has the following characteristics – produces a surplus 



of food; establishes towns or cities with some form of government; division  of 

labor.  


c.

 

Empire: Form of government in which an individual or a single people rules over 

many other peoples and their territory 

3.

 



Guided Practice: Hand out the timeline activity.  Have students:  

a.

 



Read the events silently and number them in chronological order.   

b.

 



Reread events and circle key verbs in each.  

c.

 



Hold a class discussion of the events, noting how they relate to the definition of a 

civilization 

4.

 

Create the timeline. Complete first date with students as example.  Have students 



complete the activity and check together. 

5.

 



Mapping Activity: Hand out student atlases and have students find the location of 

historical Aksum.  Describe current geographic features of the area (landforms, bodies of 

water, climate, vegetation, natural resources) 

a.

 



What might Aksum have been able to trade? (Using teacher background; if 

possible provide students with actual Aksum trade materials.) 

b.

 

Hand out the Mapping Activity and model the labeling activity  (one label, one 



arrow) 

c.

 



Have students complete the mapping activity and questions 

6.

 



Concluding Discussion: 

a.

 



Discuss/correct the map and questions 

b.

 



Discuss some of the factors that allowed Aksum to grow. (see teacher 

background) 

c.

 

Discuss some of the factors that led to the decline of Aksum. 



 

Assessment of Activity

 



 

Completion of timeline 

 

Completion of mapping activity 



 

Paragraph – compare rise and fall of Aksum to other civilizations/empires 



 

Paragraph – what aspects of the decline of Aksum might be influencing this region of 



the world today? 

 

Adaptations:   

 

Work in pairs 



 

Fill dates in on timeline for students – students fill in events 



 

Direct instruction for timeline and map activity 



 

Label locations on map for students 



 

 


Michigan Geographic Alliance                   Aksum: No Questions 

2007 


 

 

Extensions: 

 

Research the ivory trade of 100 C.E. and compare it to the ivory trade of today. Why 



has the ivory trade changed? 

 



Follow the history of Christian Ethiopia from the fall of Aksum to present. What has 

happened to this group? 

 

Research the coinage of Aksum. How does a coinage system change a trading 



system? 

 



Compare the Aksum civilization to other civilizations of the time, for example, the 

Maya. Why did the Aksum civilization fade away relatively quickly while the 

Mayans continued to influence Central America until C.E. 1500’s? 

 



Research the Aksum using the primary document, Inscription of Ezana, King of 

Aksum, circa 325 C.E. Compare Aksum’s relationship with its trading partners to that 

of the Mayan. 

 

 




Michigan Geographic Alliance                   Aksum: No Questions 

2007 


 

 

Teacher Background 

 

 

Some factors in the rise of Aksum: 



 

 

 



Location – Blue Nile, Red Sea for trade 

 

 



 

Forests – for charcoal used in metal work 

 

 

 



Fertile soil – agriculture 

 

 



 

Trade Goods – ivory, skins, metal work, emeralds, grains, slaves 

 

 

 



Currency – first African currency outside of Roman sphere 

 

Some factors in the decline of Aksum: 



 

 

 



Movement of Persian Empire into the Arabian Peninsula 

 

 



 

The expansion of Islam 

 

 

 



Deforestation 

 

 



 

Soil degradation 

Movement of trade routes from Red Sea to Persian Gulf and east 

 

 



Timeline Notes for the Aksum Civilization 

 

 

c. 4



th

 cnt. B.C.E-1

st

 c. B.C.E. possible beginnings of Aksum and the Region 



c. 1

st

 cnt. BCE- the City of Aksum is established 



c. mid 1

st

 cnt. B.C.E.- the Ruler Zos(c)kales is established as King 



c. 3

rd

 cnt. C.E. -Aksum begins interfering in South Arabian affairs 



c. late 3

rd

 cnt.(270-610) C.E.-Aksum begins minting their own currency 



c. 325-328 C.E.-By order of King Ezana, Aksum coverts to Christianity 

c. 320-330 C.E.-Aksum begins using the symbol of the “Cross” on  their    

 

 

 



        coinage 

c. 350 C.E- Aksum conquures the Kingdom of Kush. 

c. late 4

th

 cnt. C.E.- Aksum controlled land in what is present day Northern  



 

 

 



         Ethiopia, Eritrea, Northern Sudan, Southern Egypt, Djibouti,   

 

                  



Western Somaliland, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia totaling around  

 

                  1.25 



million km2 

c. 5


th

-6

th



 cnt. C.E.- Aksum is believed to be a quasi-ally of Byzantium against  

 

 



 

         the Persian Empire—also beginning of their 2

nd

 Golden Age 



c. 6

th

 cnt. C.E.- Due to economic isolation and the increase and spread of Islam,    



 

         

the Kingdom of Aksum begins to decline 

c. early 7

th

 cnt. C.E.- Aksum ceases production of coins 



c. 950 C.E.- Aksum dissolves with an invasion  from the south of pagan or  

 

 



                 

Jewish peoples, possibly the Jewish Queen Gudit 

c. 10

th

 cnt. C.E.- Dark Ages begin 



c. 11

th

-12



th

 cnt. C.E.- Aksum civilization is replaced by the Zagwe Dynasty 

 

 



Michigan Geographic Alliance                   Aksum: No Questions 

2007 


 

 

Interesting Facts About Ethiopia’s History and Current Affairs 

 

Unique among African countries, the ancient Ethiopian monarchy maintained its freedom from 



colonial rule with the exception of the 1936-41 Italian occupation during World War II. In 1974, 

a military junta, the Derg, deposed Emperor Haile SELASSIE (who had ruled since 1930) and 

established a socialist state. Torn by bloody coups, uprisings, wide-scale drought, and massive 

refugee problems, the regime was finally toppled in 1991 by a coalition of rebel forces, the 

Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF). A constitution was adopted in 

1994, and Ethiopia's first multiparty elections were held in 1995. A border war with Eritrea late 

in the 1990's ended with a peace treaty in December 2000. Final demarcation of the boundary is 

currently on hold due to Ethiopian objections to an international commission's finding requiring 

it to surrender territory considered sensitive to Ethiopia. 

 

Ethiopia is a landlocked - entire coastline along the Red Sea was lost with the de jure 



independence of Eritrea on 24 May 1993; the Blue Nile, the chief headstream of the Nile by 

water volume, rises in T'ana Hayk (Lake Tana) in northwest Ethiopia; three major crops are 

believed to have originated in Ethiopia: coffee, grain sorghum, and castor bean 

 

Ethiopia is the oldest independent country in Africa and one of the oldest in the world - at least 



2,000 years 

 

Ethiopia's poverty-stricken economy is based on agriculture, accounting for almost half of GDP, 



60% of exports, and 80% of total employment. The agricultural sector suffers from frequent 

drought and poor cultivation practices. Coffee is critical to the Ethiopian economy with exports 

of some $350 million in 2006, but historically low prices have seen many farmers switching to 

qat to supplement income. The war with Eritrea in 1998-2000 and recurrent drought have 

buffeted the economy, in particular coffee production. In November 2001, Ethiopia qualified for 

debt relief from the Highly Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) initiative, and in December 2005 the 

IMF voted to forgive Ethiopia's debt to the body. Under Ethiopia's land tenure system, the 

government owns all land and provides long-term leases to the tenants; the system continues to 

hamper growth in the industrial sector as entrepreneurs are unable to use land as collateral for 

loans. Drought struck again late in 2002, leading to a 3.3% decline in GDP in 2003. Normal 

weather patterns helped agricultural and GDP growth recover in 2004-06. 

Ethiopia is the transit hub for heroin originating in Southwest and Southeast Asia and destined 

for Europe, as well as cocaine destined for markets in southern Africa; cultivates qat (khat) for 

local use and regional export, principally to Djibouti and Somalia (legal in all three countries); 

the lack of a well-developed financial system limits the country's utility as a money laundering 

center 


 

Religions:  Christian 60.8% (Orthodox 50.6%, Protestant 10.2%), Muslim 32.8%, traditional 

4.6%, other 1.8% (1994 census) 

 

Exports:  $17.65 million f.o.b. (2006 est.) 



Partners: Germany 15.5%, China 10.5%, Japan 8.5%, Saudi Arabia 6.9%, Djibouti 6.8%, 

Switzerland 6.4%, Italy 5.9%, US 5.5%, Netherlands 4.2% (2005) 

 



Michigan Geographic Alliance                   Aksum: No Questions 

2007 


 

 

Commodities: coffee, qat, gold, leather products, live animals, oilseeds 



 

Imports: $4.105 billion f.o.b. (2006 est.) 

Partners: Saudi Arabia 14.7%, China 12.6%, US 12.4%, India 6.7%, Italy 4.6% (2005) 

 

Commodities: food and live animals, petroleum and petroleum products, chemicals, 



machinery, motor vehicles, cereals, textiles 

 

 



 

Interesting Facts About Eritrea’s History and Current Affairs 

 

Background Information:  Eritrea was awarded to Ethiopia in 1952 as part of a federation. 



Ethiopia's annexation of Eritrea as a province 10 years later sparked a 30-year struggle for 

independence that ended in 1991 with Eritrean rebels defeating governmental forces; 

independence was overwhelmingly approved in a 1993 referendum. A two-and-a-half-year 

border war with Ethiopia that erupted in 1998 ended under UN auspices in December 2000. 

Eritrea currently hosts a UN peacekeeping operation that is monitoring a 25 km-wide Temporary 

Security Zone on the border with Ethiopia. An international commission, organized to resolve 

the border dispute, posted its findings in 2002. However, both parties have been unable to reach 

agreement on implementing the decision. In November 2006, the international commission 

informed Eritrea and Ethiopia they had one year to demarcate the border or the border 

demarcation would be based on coordinates.  

 

Geographic Note:  strategic geopolitical position along world's busiest shipping lanes; Eritrea 



retained the entire coastline of Ethiopia along the Red Sea upon de jure independence from 

Ethiopia on 24 May 1993 

 

Religions:  Muslim, Coptic Christian, Roman Catholic, Protestant 



 

Exports:  $17.65 million f.o.b. (2006 est.) 

Partners: Italy 31.4%, US 11.9%, Belarus 5.9%, France 5.1%, Germany 4.6%, Turkey 

4.4%, UK 4% (2005) 

 

Commodities: livestock, sorghum, textiles, food, small manufactures (2000) 



 

Imports: $701.8 million f.o.b. (2006 est.) 

Partners: Italy 15.1%, France 11.8%, US 9.5%, Germany 8.6%, Taiwan 7.3%, India 7%, 

Ireland 6.1%, Turkey 4.4%, Jordan 4.2% (2005) 

 

Commodities: machinery, petroleum products, food, manufactured goods 



 

 

Source: CIA World Fact Book (July 17, 2007) 



https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/et.html

 

 



Michigan Geographic Alliance                   Aksum: No Questions 

2007 


 

 

Student Worksheet 

 

Aksum Timeline Activity

 

 

Put the following events in chronological order starting with one for the earliest to eight for the most recent. Then complete the 



timeline. 

 

 



_____ Aksum completes conversion to Christianity, 330 C.E. 

 

_____ King Kaleb of Aksum conquers Yemen, 525 C.E. 



_____ Persians force Aksum out of Arabian Peninsula, 575 C.E.   

_____ End of Aksum as capital city, 619 C.E. 

_____ Evidence of Zoskales and city of Aksum, 50 C.E.   

 

_____ Aksum Kingdom trade with Egypt, Arabia, Rome, India, 500 C.E. 



_____ Coins minted in Aksum, 270 C.E.  

 

 



 

_____ King Ezana of conquers Kingdom of Kush, 350 C.E. 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

         I                                     I                                    I                                    I                                    I                                    I                            I             

 

    25 C.E.                       125 C.E.                         225 C.E.                        325 C.E.                      425 C.E.                       525 C.E.                 625 C.E. 



 


Michigan Geographic Alliance                   Aksum: No Questions 

2007 


 

 

Student Worksheet  



Mapping Activity

 

 



You will be mapping the rise and decline of the Aksum Kingdom. You should have the 

following materials to complete the activity: 

1.

 

Your timeline worksheet 



2.

 

Map of northeast Africa/southwest Asia (Aksum and Kush already labeled) 



3.

 

Colored pencils 



4.

 

Student atlas or book 



 

Locate and label the following on your map with a brown pencil: Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, 

Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Egypt, Sudan, Red Sea, Blue Nile, Nile, Gulf of Aden, Ethiopian 

Highlands 

 

Use the information on your timeline to complete the rest of the map activity. 



 

Rise and Expansion of Aksum 

Using a red pencil, draw arrows from Aksum to areas/countries conquered by Aksum. Label the 

appropriate date. 

 

Using a green pencil, draw arrows from Aksum to the areas/countries, or in the direction of the 



areas/countries, that traded with Aksum. Label the appropriate date. 

 

Decline of Aksum 

Using a purple pencil, draw arrows back to Aksum showing the effect of Persia on Aksum trade. 

Label the arrow with the appropriate date. 

 

Using a black pencil, draw an “X” over Aksum and Kush, and label the date each moved or fell. 



 

Map Thinking Questions: When you are finished with your map, complete the following 

questions in complete sentences. 

 

What did Aksum gain by conquering Kush? 



 

 

 



List ways the Aksum civilization’s location helped in their development of trade. 

 

 



 

 

Looking at the map, list some possible means of transportation/trade. 



 

 

 



How did trade affect the development of the Aksum civilization? 

 


Yüklə 78,22 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə