Private botanical gardens in Russia: Between noble culture and scientific professionalization



Yüklə 107,65 Kb.

tarix24.12.2017
ölçüsü107,65 Kb.


The Global and the Local: The History of Science and the Cultural Integration of Europe. 

 

Proceedings of the 2

nd

 ICESHS (Cracow, Poland, September 6



9, 2006) / Ed. by M. Kokowski.

 

 

579 



 

Olga Yu. Elina

 

 

Private botanical gardens in Russia: Between noble culture 



and scientific professionalization (1760s

 



1917) 

 

(1) Introduction

 

For  centuries,  Russia  was  known  as  an  archetypically  agricultural  country  that  has  lived  off  arable 



farming; grain export accounted for the main portion of state revenue. It is widely believed, therefore, 

that  the  attitude  of  Russian  landowners  towards  plants  was  purely  economic;  they  concentrated  on 

improvement of industrial crops important for increasing yields. However, as our research shows, for 

quite a few noble private individuals interest towards plants did not stop with crop fields; it was in fact  

frequently stimulated by  motivations somewhat removed from pragmatism.  Garden design and plant 

collection  became  no  less  important  for  Russian  noblemen  than  farming.  Such  a  passion  became  an 

aesthetic  amateur  pastime,  a  ―scientific  experimenting‖,  and  sometimes  a  sophisticated  formula  for 

relieving the boredom of the Russian provincial life as well. This makes Russia akin to England, with 

its tradition of interplay between agriculture and garden design.

1

 Russia gave birth to a peculiar garden-



ing  tradition,  influenced  mainly  by  the  lifestyles  of  the  landed  gentry.  Garden  design  and  botanical 

collection became a part of noble culture. The historical, socio-cultural, and scientific aspects of Russian 

private botanical gardens are the focus of the proposed paper. 

(2) Early Initiatives: Monastery and Czars Gardens 

Russian gardens, which merit experts’ attention on their own, are of interest in the European context as 

well for several reasons. First, as other cultural institutions, classical botanical gardens in Russia were 

modeled on those in countries like England, France and Germany. Secondly, they accommodated good 

many  European  botanists,  who  came  to  Russia  for  high  professional  status  and  financial  prosperity. 

Finally, Russian botanical gardens, which possessed a number of unique plants, freely exchanged their 

collections with Kew, Paris, Versailles, Vienna, Berlin, etc.  

A few words should be said about the history of Russian gardens per se.  

For  centuries,  Russia  formed  its  own  culture  of  garden  design,  which  borrowed  from  Orthodox 

Church tradition. The origin of gardens in Russia dates back to Kiev Russia in the 11–12th centuries, 

when Byzantine monks created first gardens in Kiev under the monasteries’ aegis. Inevitable centrepiece 

of such a garden would have been an apple tree and other fruit trees, cultivated both for utilitarian and 

aesthetic  purposes.  In  the  middle  ages,  monastery  gardens  appeared  in  all  Russian  principalities  — 

from Kiev to Novgorod and Moscow.

2

 According to Russian horticulturalist and historian of gardens 



A.

 

E. Regel,  



the  monastery  gardens  entranced  local  inhabitants  and  pious  Czars  and  Czarinas  alike. 

After  the  monastery  gardens  there  appeared  at  first  Czarist,  and  also,  of  course,  boyar 

gardens,  which  were  as  closely  modeled  on  the  monastery  ones  as  possible,  and  in  the 

end the locals followed suit, which resulted in the whole of Moscow being adorned with 

gardens.

3

 



 

                                                 

*

 

Institute  of  the  History  of  Science  and  Technology,  Russian  Academy  of  Sciences,  Moscow;  email: 



olgaelina@mail.ru

 

.



 

1

 See: Headfield, M. Pioneers in Gardening. London, 1955.  



2

 For  more  details  on  the  medieval  gardens    in  Russia,  see:  Cherny,  V.D.  ―Typology  and  Evolution  of 

Russian Medieval Garden‖ (In Russian). Russian Estate, 2002. 8 (24), pp. 27–40; Vergunov, A. P., Gorokhov, 

V.A. Russian Gardens and Parks (In Russian). Moscow, 1988. 

3

 Regel, A.E. Decorative Horticulture and Designed Gardens (In Russian). S.–Petersburg, 1896, p. 15.  




CHAPTER 19. / Symposium R-11. 

Botanical gardens within global and local dynamics: Sociability, professionalization ...

 

 

580 

Thus,  the  Czarist  gardens  appeared  in  the  15–16th  centuries;  they  were  closely  modeled  on  the 



monastery  ones.  The  situation  began  to  change  under  Czar  Alexey  Mikhailovich.  During  his  rule  in 

the second half of the 17th century, first attempts were made to examine European examples of garden 

design.  

(3) Peter I: Reforms of garden design 

However, it was his son Peter (Peter I, nicknamed ―the Great‖, ruled in 1689–1725), who changed the 

tradition drastically. In the context of Peter’s reforms the idea of a garden acquired cultural and political 

resonance. Peter understood perfectly that the garden was primarily and foremost a place of enlighten-

ment  and  education.  Under  Peter’s  instructions,  gardens  and  parks  were  designed  to  accelerate  the 

process of ―Europeanization‖ of the country, along with academies, universities and art galleries. The 

garden,  now  full  of  sculptures,  fountains,  green  labyrinths,  and  specially  designed  plants,  told  the 

Russians about European symbolism and mythology, which enabled them to converse with foreigners 

on a common cultural ground. The semantics of gardens were of primary importance in Peter’s garden 

reform.


4

 

The  idea  of  a  botanical  collection  was also  implemented  into the  Russian  garden  during  Peter’s 



reforms. In a way, we could refer to Peter as the first real patron of garden design and plant collection. 

He  got  involved  in  every  detail  of  collecting,  and  gave  highly  qualified  instructions  about  places  to 

visit  and  specimens  to  bring.

5

  In  1710s,  he  invited  a  number  of  landscape  designers,  gardeners  and 



botanists from all over Europe to set up his gardens near St. Petersburg, including Letny (―Summer‖) 

garden  and  Gatchina  garden.  Starting  the  construction,  Peter  visited  the  finest  park  ensembles  of 

France (including Versailles), where he examined the details of High Baroque, or French formal style 

of garden design, and made his own sketches.

6

  

Under Peter’s supervision, new Medical Gardens were set up in the beginning of the 18th century 



in  Moscow  and  St.  Petersburg,  which  were  later  turned  into  the  largest  botanical  gardens:  Moscow 

University Botanical Garden, and Imperial St. Petersburg Botanical Garden (today known as Komarov 

Botanical Institute).  

In the meantime, due to Peter’s expansionist policy Russia became an empire. The exploration of 

new territories had major consequences on the collection work undertaken in Moscow and Petersburg, 

and  its  expansion  into  the  provinces  (Voronezh,  Tobolsk,  and  other  places  where  Medical  Gardens 

appeared).  In  a  way,  setting  up  these  gardens  reflected  the  setup  of  the  empire  —  collecting  plants 

from remote regions symbolized the unification of the empire.

7

  

Thanks  to  Peter,  the  construction  of  gardens  became  a  ―fashion‖  among  the  court  elite.  All  of 



Peter’s boyar associates hired designers and botanists to create their own gardens. A famous one was 

Oranienbaum set up in 1723 by count Menshikov, where oranges were cultivated for the first time in 

Russia (which gave Oranienbaum its name).

8

  



(4) Catherine II and first botanical collections 

The second half of the 18

th

 century — the period associated with Catherine II (nicknamed ―the Great‖, 



ruled  in  1762–1796)  was  a  time  of prosperity  for  gardens in the empire.  At  that  time,  Russia held a 

position  as  one  of  the  leading  countries  in  the  garden  arrangement.  According  to  reports  from  the 

Historic Garden Committee of the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS),

 

                                                 



4

 For more detailed discussion, see: Likhachev, D. S. The Poetry of Gardens. On the Semantics of Gardens’ 



and Parks’ Styles (In Russian). S.-Petersburg, 1991.  

5

 See: Letters and Papers of Peter the Great (In Russian). S.-Petersburg, Moscow–Leningrad. 1900, 1975, 1977.  



6

 Dubyago, T. B. Russian Gardens and Parks of Formal Style (In Russian). Leningrad, 1963. 

7

 For  more  details,  see:  Elina,  O.  Yu.  ―From  the  Czar’s  Gardens  to  the  Experiment  Station:  Agronomy 



Experiments  on  the  Russian  Country  Estate‖  (In  Russian).    Voprosy  Istorii  Estestvoznaniya  I  Tekhniki  (VIET)

2005. Vol. 1–2. 

8

 Kocharyants, D.  A., Raskin  A. G.  Gardens and Parks of the Palaces Ensembles of S.-Petersburg and its 



suburbs (In Russian). S.-Petersburg, 2003.   


Olga Yu. Elina 

Private botanical gardens in Russia: Between noble culture and ...

 

 

581 

in the 18th century 65 gardens were created in Russia (for comparison, 71 were set up in England, 66 —



 in Italy, 51 — in France).

9

  



The  development  of  gardens  was  assisted  by  the  socio-economic  policy  under  Catherine’s  rule. 

Reflecting the growing power of the empire, and rapid expansion into the newly colonized territories, 

a  number  of  scientific  expeditions  were  undertaken,  including  the  round-the-world  ones;  they 

delivered plants and seeds to Czarist and Medical gardens in Moscow and St. Petersburg. At that time, 

Russian gardens turned into unique spaces, which presented specimens from all over the world.  

Another reform of Catherine’s rule was the land reform, which resulted in the formation of estate 

gentry as a separate class. Estates quickly acquired a representative significance. The flourishing agri-

cultural  trade  with  Western  Europe  in  combination  with  serf  labor  brought  large  profits  for  estate 

(landed) gentry, enabling them to spend enormous funds on luxury items, plants being amongst them. 

Botanical collection became part of a noble culture for the Russian estate aristocracy. It served as an 

amusement, an amateur scientific pastime, as a formula for enlightenment, and sometimes as a sophis-

ticated means of relieving the boredom.

10

  

A few words should be said about the Empress herself, who like Peter, became a supreme patron 



of  botanical  collection.  Under  her  guidance,  Czarist  gardens  received  plants  and  seeds  from  the 

expeditions of the Imperial St. Petersburg Academy of Sciences as well as from the best collections of 

England,  France  and  Italy.  Moreover,  in  1794  the  first  exchange  took  place:  220  specimens  from 

Russia (predominantly Siberian species) were sent to Kew garden after an agreement had been achieved 

in private correspondence between Catherine and Sir Joseph Banks.

11

  



State  patronage  and  leading  role  of  academic  institutions  have  been  considered  as  the  two  main 

characteristics of science in Russia since the 18th century. This paper argues that at least in botanical 

collection amateur initiatives played an important role as well.  

In the context of garden development, the second half of the 18th century in Russia was renowned 

for the appearance of private botanical gardens.   

(5) “Exotic passion” of Prokopy Demidov: Neskuchny Botanical Garden

 

Neskuchny, probably the first private botanical garden in Russia, belonged to the prominent aristocrat 

of Catherine’s era Prokopy Demidov (1729–1786). The Demidovs were a family of wealthy industrialists 

and art patrons, who became noblemen under Peter I. In 1756 Prokopy Demidov, who was famous for 

his ―eccentricity‖ and ―exotic passions‖, started the construction of the French formal garden in the 

most beautiful place on Moskva River.

12

  

There  is  no  accurate  data  concerning  scientific  staff  and  management  of  Neskuchny  garden.  No 



references as to who exactly collected plants for Demidov. In his letters, he simply mentioned that four 

gardeners were working in Neskuchny, but no names. Demidov also mentioned the places from which 

he was getting specimens, botanical gardens in Vienna and Paris among them.

13

 Meanwhile, according 



to  accurate  sources,  two  scientists  were  in  charge  of  the  garden.  They  were  Germans.  One  was  an 

Academician of the Imperial St. Petersburg Academy of Sciences Peter-Simon Pallas. Second scientist 

was an Adjunct of Botany in the Academy George Steller (member of famous Vitas Bering Kamchatka 

expedition). Pallas, who first met Demidov sometime around 1770, probably delivered some specimens 

to Neskuchny from the Academy’s expeditions to the central regions of Russia, Volga, and  Southern 

                                                 

9

 For the details of the ICOMOS data, see: Mikulina, E. M. The History of Garden Design. Doctoral theses. 



Moscow, 1984. P. 7–8.  

10

 For the details, see: Elina, ―From the Czar’s Gardens…‖, pp. 18–21. 



11

  See:  Catherine  II.  Assays  and  Memoirs  (In  Russian).  Moscow,  1990.  P.  167;  Carter,  H.  B.  ―Sir  Joseph 

Banks and the plants collection from Kew sent to the Empress Catherine II of Russian, 1795‖.  Bull. Brit. Mus. 

Nat. History. 1974. Vol. 4, № 5.   

12

 On  Demidov  family,  see:  Golovshchikov,  K.  D.  The  Demidovs  Noble  Family  (In  Russian).  Yaroslavl’, 



1881;  Yurkin,  I.  N.  The  Demidovs  —  Scientists,  Engineers,  Organizers  of  Science  and  Industry  (In  Russian). 

Moscow, 2001. 

13

 For the details, see: Family Line of the Demidovs, and Correspondence of Prokopy Demidov (In Russian). 



Russian Archive, 1873. № 11; Aleksandrov, L. P. The Past of the Neskuchny Garden (In Russian). Moscow, 1923. 


CHAPTER 19. / Symposium R-11. 

Botanical gardens within global and local dynamics: Sociability, professionalization ...

 

 

582 

Siberia in 1768–1774.



14

 And, Demidov, in his turn, handed over to Pallas seeds from Neskuchny and some 

herbaria  sheets  for  Pallas’  famous  herbarium  (according  to  some  sources,  Pallas  was  keeping  his 

herbarium in Neskuchny). When speaking about Neskuchny in 1781, Pallas asserted, ―This garden not 

only  has  no  equal  in  Russia,  but  is  also  comparable  to  many  famous  botanical  gardens  in  other 

countries in terms of rarity of the plants‖.

15

 In the same year, Pallas published ―A catalogue for plants 



in the garden of Demidov‖ with 2000 species mentioned. According to the later 1806 catalogue, the 

garden collection included 4363 species. The herbarium of Neskuchny possessed around 4500 species 

from Europe, Asia, North and South Americas. It was granted to the Moscow University after Demidov’s 

death and was partly destroyed during Moscow fire in 1812.

16

 

Neskuchny  was  not  Demidov’s  only  experiment  in  constructing  a  botanical  garden.  In  1740s,  a 



small garden appeared in Demidov’s estate near Solikamsk in the Urals. Botanist George Steller, who 

stayed  in  Solikamsk  on  his  way  back  from  the  Kamchatka  expedition,  used  this  garden  to  plant  the 

dying  collection  of  Kamchatka  and  Aleut  islands  species  (about  80),  which  he  was  carrying  for  the 

Imperial St. Petersburg Academy of Sciences. Steller’s specimens formed the base of the collection. It 

is known that Carl Linne, who was interested in Siberia flora, received seeds sent from Solikamsk by 

Demidov’s  brother  Nikita,  also  an  amateur  botanist,  one  of  Voltaire’s  correspondents  from  Russia. 

The  academician  Ivan  Lepekhin,  who  visited  Solikamsk  garden  in  1771,  counted  422  species  there, 

including the palm Caryota urens and other exotic plants.

17

 

Following  the  death  of  its  owner  in  1786,  Neskuchny  garden  gradually  began  to  decline.  Some 



rare  plants  went  to  the  Moscow  Medical  Garden  (from  1805  —  the  Botanical  Garden  of  Moscow 

University); the Pallas herbarium was transferred to Gorenki — another private botanical garden to be 

discussed.  

(6) Gorenki: Garden of new design and scientific enterprise 

Gorenki  was  the  most  famous  private  botanical  garden  that  had  ever  existed  in  Russia.  Enormous 

Gorenki estate of around 730 hectares belonged to the prominent family line of Razumovsky counts.

18

 



The botanical history of Gorenki began with count Alexei Razumovsky, who started his collection on 

the break of the 19th century. He invited architects and garden designers to built the palace and set up 

a decorative park laid out in the English landscape style. Furthermore, 42 hothouses were constructed 

— the main one, the Palm Glasshouse, was 12m high. In 1809, the only Russian vanilla tree bloomed 

in  Gorenki  Glasshouse.  The  palace  housed  an  extensive  botanical  library,  collection  of  seeds,  and 

large  herbarium.  The  construction  of  Gorenki  cost  Razumovsky  more  than  one  million  rubles  (an 

enormous sum of money in those days).

19

 ―Inside the great Gorenki palace, among czarist luxury, he 



has locked himself in alone with his plants‖, wrote a contemporary about Razumovsky’s devotion.

20

 



The garden did indeed amaze with its abundance and variety of plants. According to another witness 

account, ―you would be simply astonished that a private individual could have amassed such a treasure 

                                                 

14

 Zelenetsky,  N.  M.  ―Pallas,  his  Life,  Scientific  Activity,  and  Role  in  the  Research  of  Russian  Flora‖  (In 



Russian). Memoirs of the Novorossiisk Society of Natural Sciences. Odessa, 1906. Vol. 41.  

15

 Cited from: Aleksandrov, L. P., Nekrasova V. L. Neskuchny Garden and its Plants (In Russian). Moscow, 



1923. P. 24. 

16

 See:  Golovkin,  B.  N.  The  History  of  Introduction  of  Plants  in  the  Botanical  Gardens  (In  Russian). 



Moscow. 1981.  

17

 See: Ibid.; Yurkin, The Demidovs — Scientists, Engineers, Organizers… 



18

 On  Razumovsky,  see:  Vasil’chikov,  A.

 

A.  Razumovskie  Family  Line  (In  Russian).  In  3  Vols.  Vol.  2.  St. 



Petersburg, 1880. 

19

 On the history of Gorenki Garden, see, for example: Nekrasova, V. L. ―Gorenki Botanical Garden (to the 



History of Russian Botanical  Gardens)‖  (In Russian).  Trudy  Instituta Istorii Estestvoznaniya I Tekhniki, 1949. 

Vol. 3, pp. 330–350; ―The Description of Botanical Garden of Count Razumovsky in Gorenki near Moscow‖ (In 

Russian).  Journal  of  Horticulture.  1859.  Vol.  VIII,  pp.  123–133;  Bondarenko,  I.  Gorenki  (In  Russian).  Starye 

Gody.1911. № 12, pp. 69–70. 

20

 Virel’, F. F. Memoirs of F. Vigel’(In Russian). Moscow, 1892. Vol. 3, p. 83. 




Olga Yu. Elina 

Private botanical gardens in Russia: Between noble culture and ...

 

 

583 

trove  of  Nature from  all  the  countries  of  the  world in  such a  short  period  of  time‖.



21

  However,  the 

count was merely a ―private patron‖, who hired botanists to collect plants and seeds for Gorenki. 

Friedrich  Christian  Stephan,  another  German,  the  professor  of  Medical  School  in  Moscow  and 

director of its Medical Garden, was officially in charge of Gorenki in 1798–1803. Over this period, he 

had formed the basis of the collection. In Gorenki Stephan also conducted the research in taxonomy, in 

particular, he described the new genus Biebersteinia.

22

 

In 1804, the position of director was taken over by a young Russian graduate of Koenigsberg and 

Leipzig  universities  Ivan  Redovsky.  Redovsky  had  established  contacts  with  European  botanical 

gardens, which enabled him to expand the Gorenki collection significantly. The first catalogue, which 

included 2846 species, appeared in 1803 under his name. In 1805, Redovsky received the position of 

the Adjunct of Botany in the Imperial St. Petersburg Academy of Sciences. Next year he was sent to 

the Russian embassy in China as a ―naturalist‖. Redovsky never actually made it to China, and instead 

spent two  years  traveling  in  Siberia,  engaged  in  collecting  of  plants  and  herbs. Throughout  his  long 

journey, he sent specimens to Gorenki.

23

  

After Redovsky’s death in 1809 the Gorenki garden was headed by  Eriedrich-Ernst-Ludwig von 



Fischer, the graduate of Halle University. Thanks to Fisher, the best botanists of that time Langsdorf, 

Tausher, Helm, and others delivered specimens to Gorenki. Under Fisher’s supervision, special expeditions 

were launched, equipped by Razumovsky for plant hunting. For example, botanist Helm traveled over 

Orenburg steppes, the Ural Mountains, and Dauria gathering plants and seeds for Gorenki. The garden 

also acquired material brought by Russian travelers from Himalaya, Japan, Brazil and Alaska. Likewise, 

via  Langsdorf,  Razumovsky  came  into  possession  of  seeds  gathered  during  the  round-the-world 

expedition of Ivan Krusenstern. According to data from the 1812 catalogue, Gorenki collection contained 

8036 species. The collection of Siberian and Far Eastern plants was regarded as one of the best in the 

world. Scientific research with the Gorenki collection also reached its peak under Fisher. Fisher, who 

himself  was  interested  primarily  in  Siberian  plants,  described  a  number  of  species  together  with 

taxonomist Mayer. Many botanists from the Imperial St. Petersburg Academy of Sciences, Moscow and 

St. Petersburg Universities, visited Gorenki to conduct research in plant taxonomy and morphology.

24

 

In 1809 Razumovsky and his associates founded the first botanical society in Russia — La Societe 



Phytographique de Gorenki. Among its members were Gorenki scientists like Fisher, Langsdorf, Stephan 

as  well  as  leading  botanists  of  the  time:  florist  G.  F.  Hoffmann,  professor  of  Botany  in  Erlangen, 

Gettingen  and  Moscow,  author  of  ―Flora  Germanica‖;  student  of  Carl  Linne,  Swedish  botanist  Karl 

Thunberg;  President  of  Carolina-Leopoldina  Johann  Christian  Schreber;  director  of  Berlin  Botanical 

Garden Karl-Ludwig Vildenov; Alexander von Humboldt, and many others. The Society composed a 

Charter  according  to  which  one  of  the  aims  was  to  ―extend  the  usefulness  of  the  activities  of  the 

Gorenki botanists… and distribute them by means of establishing very close links with botanists from 

all around the world‖.

25

 The members of the society also decided that a magazine should be published. 



However, in 1810 the society was united with the Moscow Society of Nature Explorers (MOIP), and 

all the papers ready for print were published in the ―Works of MOIP‖. 

The Gorenki garden existed only until the mid 1820s. After the death of Razumovsky in 1822, the 

collection  was  no  longer  kept  in  proper  condition.  Thanks  to  Fisher,  who  at  that  time  became  a 

Director of the Imperial St. Petersburg Botanical Garden, the most valuable plants, herbarium and the 

library were transferred to Petersburg; several plants ended up in Moscow University Garden. The re-

mainder was sold to private individuals, primarily Moscow region landowners. However, one can detect 

a moment of ―revenge‖ in this tragic outcome: in 1811, as the Minister for People’s Enlightenment, 

Razumovsky issued a decree to sell of the Academy of Sciences’ Botanical Garden  — in the light of 

its  ―excessive  expenses‖  and  ―failure  to  acquire  any  particular  use.‖  The  reason  for  Razumovsky’s 

                                                 

21

 Svin’in, P. Home Objects of Note, Published by Pavel Svin’in (In Russian). Moscow, 1823. Vol. 3, p. 129. 



22

 Stephan, F. ―Description de deux noveaux genues des plantes‖. Mem. Soc. Nat. Moscou. 1806. 

23

 See: Nekrasova, ―Gorenki Botanical Garden…‖  



24

 Ibid. 

25

 Ibid., p. 344. 




CHAPTER 19. / Symposium R-11. 

Botanical gardens within global and local dynamics: Sociability, professionalization ...

 

 

584 

decision may have been his own garden: having invested colossal sums into his passion, Razumovsky 



was very jealous of botanical work, in which he himself was not involved.

26

 



(7) Last private botanical garden: Ol’gino

 

Ol’gino, probably the last private botanical collection in Russia, stood out from the rest. It was created 

by  professional  botanists,  who  were  at  the  same  time  patrons,  managers,  and  collectors.  Petersburg 

botanist Olga Fedchenko together with her son, also a botanist, created the Ol’gino garden in 1895 in 

their  family  estate  near  Moscow.  Fedchenko  was  the  second  female  member-correspondent  of  the 

Academy  of  Sciences  in  the  country.  A  private  garden  gave  an  opportunity  to  extend  her  research. 

Fedchenko  herself brought  plants  and  seeds from  numerous  expeditions  to  Caucasus,  Crimea,  South 

Urals, Turkestan, West Tien Shan, and Pamirs. She also exchanged plants with a number of botanists 

and  botanical  gardens,  including  Vienna,  Berlin,  Geneva,  Paris,  and  Kew.  She  wrote  the  classical 

treatises ―Conspectus florae Turkestanicae‖, ―Flora Pamirica‖, and others, and was the best specialists 

in Turkestan flora in the world. Many specimens, planted in Olgino, served for Fedchenko’s taxonomic 

research, in particularly, of genuses Eremurus and IrisEremurus olgae Rgl. and more than 40 other 

species were named after Olga Fedchenko. This garden was destroyed by the Bolsheviks in 1921, and 

Fedchenko’s collection died.

27

  

The full list of private botanical gardens is presented in the chart. 



Private botanical gardens in the Russian Empire

 

 



Name and 

place 

 

Period 

 

Patron/owner 

Botanists in 

charge/visiting 

Collection/ 

Species 

1. 


Solikamsk,  

the Urals 

1740s – 1760s 

Demidov family 

G. Steller, 

I. Lepekhin 

422 sp. 

Rich in Siberian 

species 

2. 


Neskuchny,  

near Moscow 

1756 – 1790s 

P. Demidov 

P.-S. Pallas 

4363 sp. 

3. 

Blandov, near 



St.Petersburg  

 

 



1789 – 

 

M. Blandov  



 

– – –


 

– – –


 

Collection of 

African and 

American species 

4. 

Sofievka, 



Ukraine  

 

1790s – 1805 



 

 

Count F. Pototsky  



 

– – – – – – 

Collection of 

South Russian 

plants  

5. 


Gorenki,  

near Moscow 

1796 – 1820s 

Count  


A. Razumovsky 

F. C. Steven, 

F.-L. Fisher, 

I. Redovsky 

Apr. 9000 sp. Rich 

in Siberian species 

6. 

Nikol’skoye, 



near Moscow  

1820s – 1860s 

Count  

P. Trubetskoy 



K. Enke 

282 sp. 


Rich  in palms

 

7. 



Sochi, Caucasus 

Second half of 

the 19th century 

P. Tatarinov  

P. Tatarinov 

Apr. 200 

Rich in Asian and  

American species

 

8. 


Vvedenskoye, 

Caucasus 

Second half of 

the 19th century 

A. Vvedensky 

– – – – – – 

Collection of 

palms 


9. 

Solibauri, near 

Batumi, 

Caucasus 

Second half of 

the 19th century 

S. Ginkul 

S. Ginkul 

Collection of 

Asian and 

American 

Species


 

10. 


 

Olgino, near 

Moscow 

1896 – 1921 



O. Fedchenko 

O. Fedchenko, 

A. Fedchenko 

Rich in Turkestan 

species, of 

Eremurus

 

                                                 



26

 See: Bobrov, E. G. ―Garden in Gorenki and the Last Years of the Academy of Sciences’ Botanical Garden‖ 

(In Russian). From Medical Garden to Botanical Institute. Moscow–Leningrad, 1957, pp. 25–31. 

27

 For the details on Ol’gino garden, see: Val’kova, O. A. Olga Aleksandrovna Fedchenko. Moscow, 2006.  




Olga Yu. Elina 

Private botanical gardens in Russia: Between noble culture and ...

 

 

585 

(8) Conclusion 

Now it is possible to outline some common characteristics, as well as differences between the above-

mentioned gardens. Private gardens in Russia were set up in the estates of Russian gentry, in line with 

the  noble  cultural  tradition,  which  united  amateur  and  professional  approaches.  If  early  gardens 

existed thanks to amateur patrons, who invested in their own scientific passion and hired professionals 

to  collect  plants  and  conduct  research,  the  later  gardens  became  self-patronizing  institutions,  where 

scientists  themselves  were  both  patrons  and  clients.  The  management  of  some  private  gardens  was 

quite  successful,  and teams  of  collectors and  researchers  were  professional  enough  to  create famous 

botanical  institutions,  which  competed  with  the  state  ones.  Constant  exchange  of  samples  —  and 

scientists — with European botanical centers took place. This enabled a number of Russian botanists, 

both local and foreign by  birth, to improve their socio-economic status. This allowed them to create 

unique collections, which later became valuable part of the Russian state botanical resources.  

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



Document Outline

  • O.Yu. Elina, "Private botanical gardens in Russia: Between noble culture and scientific professionalization (1760s –1917)"


Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə