Quick reference guide template



Yüklə 57,02 Kb.

tarix10.11.2017
ölçüsü57,02 Kb.


 

 

 



EY’s Russian Tax & Law 

practice was named a leading 



Tax firm in Russia 

in “World 

Tax 2015,” an annual guide 

published by the International 



Tax Review.

 

The law and practice relating to the recovery of tax debts develop in parallel 



with techniques for evading the payment of arrears revealed by tax audits.  

Over the last few years we have witnessed a number of court rulings 

supporting tax recovery methods applied by tax authorities in situations 

where the business operations of a taxpayer in debt have been transferred to 

a new company.

1

 This approach was made possible by the introduction in 



subsection 2 of clause 2 of Article 45 of the Tax Code of provisions allowing 

tax authorities to present tax demands not only to subsidiary/participating 

companies of a debtor taxpayer, but also to companies declared by a court to 

be “otherwise dependent” in relation to a taxpayer which is in arrears (the 

version effective from 1 January 2017 uses the term “persons”

2

). 



We should point out that such recovery may take place only where a company 

in arrears has transferred funds or other property to a dependent company 

(person) after it became aware or should have become aware that a tax audit 

was to take place, and that transfer has made it impossible for the arrears to 

be recovered. 

The Avtoritet-Avto case: A precedent for the recovery of tax arrears from a 

creditor bank 

On 26 January 2017 a landmark case involving Avtoritet-Avto, in which 

Sotsialny Kommercheskiy Bank Primorya “Proimsotsbank” PAO (“the Bank”) 

acted as the respondent, ended in the rejection of an application for the 

referral of the cassation appeal to the Judicial Panel of the Supreme Court. 

The ruling on the case asserted that it was legally justified for tax arrears to 

be recovered from the Bank, which had accepted property of the debtor 

taxpayer in settlement of credit debt. 

 

                                                      



1

 The Korolevskaya Voda OOO case – No. А40-28598/2013; the Interos OOO case – No. A40-

77894/2015; the Trest Stroymekhanizatsiya OOO case - No. А12-14630/2014; the SU-91 

Inzhstroyset case – No. А40-153792/2014. 

2

 Federal Law No. 401-FZ of 30 November 2016, 



7 March 2017 

Developments Regarding the Recovery 

of Tax Debts from Dependent Entities  



 

 



Details of the Case 

Avtoritet-Avto OOO was ordered to pay additional 

tax following an on-site tax audit.  Since the 

Company failed to meet its obligations voluntarily, 

the tax authority took steps to recover the 

amounts due from the taxpayer’s cash and 

property.  However, this did not result in the debt 

being settled, since Avtoritet-Avto OOO’s entire 

business had been transferred to Avtoritet-Avto+ 

OOO, while immovable property (an autocentre 

building) had been transferred to the Bank in 

settlement of debt.  

As far as the transfer of property to the Bank was 

concerned, the tax authority discovered the 

following circumstances: 

 



The same individuals and their relatives were 

directly or indirectly involved in the activities of 

Avtoritet-Avto OOO, Avtoritet-Avto+ OOO and 

the Bank; 

 

The Bank continued to lend to Avtoritet-Avto 



OOO even after the company stopped making 

repayments, and refrained from imposing any 

civil penalties on it.  This showed, in the tax 

authority’s view, that the Bank had deliberately 

sought to build up the debt of a dependent 

entity (in order to make the amount of the loan 

debt greater than the value of the collateral 

that could be used to settle tax arrears); 

 

Arranging the assignment of Avtoritet-Avto 



OOO’s credit debt through operations involving 

the use of a specially created company, Erius 

OOO, enabled Avtoritet-Avto’s property, 

including the autocentre, to be transferred to 

the Bank.  The autocentre was then leased to 

Avtoritet-Avto+, and Erius OOO was liquidated.  

The tax authority petitioned the court to declare 

Avtoritet-Avto OOO and the Bank interdependent 

and allow tax arrears to be recovered from the 

Bank. 


The first instance court took the Bank’s side, 

stating that there was no decisive and 

incontrovertible evidence that the entities were 

interdependent or that the Bank had direct 

influence over the activities of Avtoritet-Avto+ 

OOO.  


The appellate and cassation courts, however, 

sided with the tax authority. They asserted that 

the term “otherwise dependent” used in clause 2 

of Article 45 of the Tax Code in reference to the 

relationship between a taxpayer and a person to 

whom a demand for the recovery of tax debt and 

been presented should be construed in terms of 

the purpose of the provision in question, i.e. that 

of combating tax avoidance in exceptional cases 

where co-ordinated actions of a taxpayer and 

other persons make it impossible for the taxpayer 

to pay its taxes, whether or not the entities 

concerned are interdependent within the meaning 

of Article 105.1 of the Tax Code.  It follows from 

this interpretation that there is no need to prove 

that the Bank exerted a direct influence on the 

activities of Avtoritet-Avto+ OOO. 

On 26 January 2017 the Supreme Court rejected 

the Bank’s application for the cassation appeal to 

be referred for further review. 

Conclusions 

The conclusions of the appellate and cassation 

courts regarding the definition of the term 

“otherwise dependent” used in subsection 2 of 

clause 2 of Article 45 of the Tax Code effectively 

give tax authorities the right to recover 

indebtedness from any person (including an 

individual) if they find evidence of co-ordinated 

actions involving the transfer of property to 

another person for the express purpose of 

avoiding the settlement of tax debts.  

 

Authors: 



Yuri Nechuyatov 

Sofia Tokareva 

Daria Vaseneva 

 

 

 



 

 

Inquiries may be directed to one of the following executives: 



 

Moscow  

 

CIS Tax & Law Leader 

Peter Reinhardt 

+7 (495) 705 9738 

 

Oil & Gas, Power & Utilities 



Alexei Ryabov 

+7 (495) 641 2913 

Victor Borodin 

+7 (495) 755 9760 

 

Financial Services 



Irina Bykhovskaya 

+7 (495) 755 9886 

Maria Frolova 

+7 (495) 641 2997 

Ivan Sychev 

+7 (495) 755 9795 

 

Industrial Products  



Alexei Kuznetsov 

+7 (495) 755 9687 

Vadim Ilyin 

+7 (495) 648 9670 

 

Consumer Products & Retail, Life Sciences & Healthcare 



Dmitry Khalilov 

+7 (495) 755 9757 

 

Real Estate, Hospitality & Construction,   Infrastructure, 



Transportation 

Vladimir Abramov 

+7 (495) 755 9680 

Anna Strelnichenko 

+7 (495) 705 9744 

Svetlana Zobnina 

+7 (495) 641 2930 

 

Technology, Telecommunications, Media & 



Entertainment;  

Tax Performance Advisory 

Ivan Rodionov 

+7 (495) 755 9719 

 

Tax Technology 



Sergey Saraev 

+7 (495) 664 7862 

 

People Advisory Services 



Zhanna Dobritskaya 

+7 (495) 755 9675 

Gueladjo Dicko 

+7 (495) 755 9961 

Sergei Makeev 

+7 (495) 755 9707 

Ekaterina Ukhova 

+7 (495) 641 2932 

 

Private Client Services 



Anton Ionov 

+7 (495) 755 9747 

 

Customs & Indirect Tax 



Vitaly Yanovskiy 

+7 (495) 664 7860 

 

Transaction Tax 



Yuri Nechuyatov 

+7 (495) 664 7884 

 

 

Cross Border Tax Advisory 



Vladimir Zheltonogov 

+7 (495) 705 9737 

Marina Belyakova  

+7 (495) 755 9948 

 

Transfer Pricing and Operating Model Effectiveness 



Evgenia Veter 

+7 (495) 660 4880 

Maxim Maximov 

+7 (495) 662 9317 

 

Tax Policy & Controversy 



  Alexandra Lobova 

+7 (495) 705 9730 

  Alexei Nesterenko  

+7 (495) 622 9319 

 

Global Compliance and Reporting 



Yulia Timonina 

+7 (495) 755 9838 

Alexei Malenkin 

+7 (495) 755 9898 

Sergei Pushkin 

+7 (495) 755 9819 

 

Law 


Dmitry Tetiouchev 

+7 (495) 755 9691 

Georgy Kovalenko 

+7 (495) 287 6511 

Tobias Luepke 

+7 (495) 641 2935 

Alexey Markov 

+7 (495) 641 2965 

 

St. Petersburg 

Dmitri  Babiner  

+7 (812) 703 7839 

Anna Kostyra 

+7 (812) 703 7873 

 

Vladivostok 

   Alexey Erokhin 

+7 (914) 727 1174

 

   


Ekaterinburg 

Irina Borodina 

+7 (343) 378 4900 

 

 



For information about Foreign Countries Business 

centers in EY Moscow office please follow the 

link

.  


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

This publication contains information in summary form and is therefore intended for general guidance only. It is not 



intended to be a substitute for detailed research or the exercise of professional judgment. Neither EYGM Limited nor any 

other member of the global EY organization can accept any responsibility for loss occasioned to any person acting or 

refraining from action as a result of any material in this publication. On any specific matter, reference should be made to 

the appropriate advisor.

 

 

© 2017 Ernst &Young (CIS) B.V.   



http://www.ey.com/

    


   

 

 



 


 

 

  



 

 

 

 



EY | Assurance | Tax | Transactions | Advisory 

About EY 

EY is a global leader in assurance, tax, transaction and advisory 

services. The insights and quality services we deliver help build 

trust and confidence in the capital markets and in economies 

the world over. We develop outstanding leaders who team to 

deliver on our promises to all of our stakeholders. In so doing, 

we play a critical role in building a better working world for our 

people, for our clients and for our communities.  

EY works together with companies across the CIS and assists 

them in realizing their business goals. 4,800 professionals work 

at 21 CIS offices (in Moscow, St. Petersburg, Novosibirsk, 

Ekaterinburg, Kazan, Krasnodar, Togliatti, Vladivostok, 

Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk, Rostov-on-Don, Almaty, Astana, Atyrau, 

Bishkek, Baku, Kyiv, Donetsk, Tashkent, Tbilisi, Yerevan, and 

Minsk).  

EY refers to the global organization, and may refer to one or 

more, of the member firms of Ernst & Young Global Limited, 

each of which is a separate legal entity. Ernst & Young Global 

Limited, a UK company limited by guarantee, does not provide 

services to clients. For more information about our 

organization, please visit ey.com. 

 

 

Contacts



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 

 

Almaty 


+7 (727) 258 5960 

Astana 


+7 (7172) 58 0400 

Atyrau 


+7 (7122) 99 6099 

Baku 


+994 (12) 490 7020 

Bishkek 


+996 (312) 39 1713 

Ekaterinburg 

+7 (343) 378 4900 

Kazan 


+7 (843) 567 3333 

Kyiv 


+380 (44) 490 3000 

Krasnodar 

+7 (861) 210 1212 

Minsk 


+375 (17) 240 4242 

 

 



 

Moscow 


+7 (495) 755 9700 

Novosibirsk 

+7 (383) 211 9007 

Rostov-on-Don 

+7 (863) 261 8400 

St. Petersburg 

+7 (812) 703 7800 

Tashkent 

+998 (71) 140 6482 

Tbilisi 


+995 (32) 215 8811 

Togliatti 

+7 (8482) 99 9777 

Vladivostok 

+7 (423) 265 8383 

Yerevan 


+374 (10) 500 790 

Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk 

+7 (4242) 49 9090 

 

 

 

© 2017 Ernst & Young (CIS) B.V. 

All Rights Reserved. 

 

 



This publication contains information in summary form and is 

therefore intended for general guidance only. It is not intended 

to be a substitute for detailed research or the exercise of 

professional judgment. Neither EYGM Limited nor any other 

member of the global EY organization can accept any 

responsibility for loss occasioned to any person acting or 

refraining from action as a result of any material in this 

publication. On any specific matter, reference should be made 

to the appropriate advisor. 

 

 



 



Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə