Regent Neighborhood Transportation Plan Vision



Yüklə 61,92 Kb.
tarix23.02.2018
ölçüsü61,92 Kb.
#27474

Regent Neighborhood Transportation Plan

Vision

The Regent Neighborhood will be a place where people have safe and convenient transportation options for accessing destinations in an environmentally and economically sustainable manner that supports a good quality-of-life for its residents. We envision roads, paths and green spaces that protect the:



  • Safety and health of pedestrians, cyclists and drivers of all ages and walks of life;

  • Historic nature of our neighborhood as an early housing amenity for the UW and Capitol;

  • Competitive real estate values that reflect some of the greatest desirability in Wisconsin;

  • Economic vitality and small business incubation that is the hallmark of Madison's Near Westside.

Goals

  • Recognize that transportation infrastructure choices can be used to enhance the standard of living in the neighborhood by promoting healthy and efficient modes that encourage citizen interactions.

  • Provide a range of accessible transportation choices that keep the safety of pedestrians, bicyclists, bus users, and motorized vehicle users in mind as facilities are planned, designed and constructed. See these websites for some guiding principles:

https://smartgrowthamerica.org/program/national-complete-streets-coalition/

http://visionzeronetwork.org/



  • Recognize that each infrastructure choice has potential for positive and negative benefits for the user community.

  • Provide information and education to influence infrastructure users' behavior.

  • Provide a policy vision that can help to influence transportation decisions by the City of Madison.

Background and Scope

The City of Madison is located in south central Wisconsin. Madison is unique in that the city center is located on an isthmus that is formed by lakes Mendota to the north and Monona to the south forming a body of land 3.3 mile long and only about 0.75 miles wide. The isthmus houses many State, City and County government offices. Toward the west side, the isthmus opens to the south and the UW campus stretches along the southern shore of Lake Mendota. Associated with this area of campus is the University of Wisconsin (UW) teaching hospital, Childrens Hospital, and the Veterans Administration hospital.

The UW campus abuts the Regent Neighborhood on its entire eastern border. The UW campus and the three hospitals abut Campus Drive, which acts as most of the northern border for the Regent Neighborhood. The remainder of the northern border follows University Avenue. The southern border extends along the Southwest bike path until the property line between the Glenway golf course and Forest Hill cemetery. The western border follows Franklin Avenue.

picture

The Regent neighborhood covers 520 acres and has 2,863 households and a population of 5,421 individuals, 40.8% of the residents live in their own homes. The median year the houses were built is 1931 and the mean house price is $426,453 (UW Madison Applied Population Laboratory, from Wisconsin State Journal, 2016). About 20% of the neighborhood residents bike to work and over 20% of the residents walk to work.

The UW-Madison, hosting in excess of 40,000 students and 20,000 faculty and staff, the three large hospitals serving hundreds of thousands, including 130,000 veterans alone, and government offices, individually constitute some of the region’s largest employers. Combined, tens of thousands of workers representing these organizations travel to and from their respective workplace each day. In addition, the people these institutions serve also travel to and from these locations - most often by personal automobile.

Given the significant geographic restrictions of the area due primarily to the isthmus formed by the two lakes, access to the UW, hospitals and government areas are seriously constrained. Compared to other neighborhoods in the City of Madison, the Regent Neighborhood (RN) is unique in that it suffers a situational burden of automotive traffic as a result of its specific geographic association with the University of Wisconsin Campus and hospitals. RNA recognizes that to some degree the same can be said for several other neighborhoods located just to the south of the Regent Neighborhood, but it is all these neighborhoods which feed into the RN and a cumulative effect is unavoidable and evident. Over the years many residents of the neighborhood have voiced their safety concerns related to the traffic burden that the RN shoulders due to its desirable location.

While the city has attempted to design street systems that do not move the bulk of automobile traffic through neighborhoods, commuters often realize that the shortest route to the UW campus and hospital area from certain areas south of Madison is to travel directly through the neighborhood. This leads to two major problems for the neighborhood’s residents. First, cars typically tend to travel in excess of the posted speed limit of 25 mph (speed limit exceed rates: Farley 74%, Highland 77%, Franklin 95%) (2010 City of Madison traffic speed studies on Highland, Franklin, and Farley) and second, the numbers of cars that travel through the neighborhood exceed what many residents consider acceptable for a pedestrian and bicycle friendly neighborhood. Altercations between cars and pedestrians or bicyclists are not infrequent and many residents in the neighborhood can readily recount numerous such occurrences in the past. Complaints to the neighborhood alder and to the Madison police and city's traffic engineering department are frequent. Perhaps exacerbating these existing concerns, is the growth of multi-story apartment buildings at the edges of the Regent Neighborhood adding additional residents that are biking and walking on the busiest corridors. A traffic incident report has recently been developed by the RNA streets and transportation team to begin to map these occurrences and to gather data. See link at the bottom of this website:

http://www.regentneighborhood.org/

Additionally, the regional street systems that feed the local neighborhood traffic must be recognized when attempting to define a transportation plan for the Regent Neighborhood. There are limited ways to access the campus and downtown, and the Regent Neighborhood receives traffic from many different directions. These include: University Avenue from the West and Campus Drive from the East, Monroe Street and Commonwealth Avenue from the southwest empty onto Regent Street at the edge of the neighborhood, and Speedway Road from the southwest onto Regent Street in front of West High School.

Other streets may connect regional feeders inside the neighborhood, including Glenway Street connecting Monroe Street to Speedway Road, Franklin Avenue connecting Speedway Road to University Avenue, Farley Avenue connecting Regent Street to University Avenue, and Highland Avenue connecting the Regent/Speedway intersection to University Avenue.

    Due to its excellent location in close proximity to UW, hospitals, Madison downtown and shopping centers, the Regent Neighborhood is considered an ideal place to live. Property values in the area support this view. The transportation system which is relied upon by a wide range of users, including neighbors, merchants, employees, and students must support that expected quality-of-life by being safe, connected, and sustainable and must treat the multi-modal transportation users safely and equitably.
General transportation plan

The road network and adjacent sidewalks are the largest component of the city’s transportation system, facilitating the public’s ability to travel from one place in Madison to another. The roadway system is functionally classified into four groups or classes of roadways according to their function, traffic volumes, and the type of service they provide (Federal Functional Classification (FFC) of Roadways). The four classes are: major arterials, minor arterials, collectors, and local roadways.

Major Arterials - Serve longer trip desires and provide high traffic volume corridors, where not served by freeways. Serve major centers of activity, with service to abutting land uses secondary to the provision of travel service. Generally, in the range of 15,000 to 35,000 vehicles per day. Typically, divided street with major access points at intersections with the surface street system. Some limited direct access permitted to abutting land uses. University Avenue is a major arterial that moves 12 bus routes and about 55,000 cars per day to and by our neighborhood. It is scheduled for reconstruction in 2022. The Near Westside Neighborhoods & University Avenue Transportation Study was conducted in 2013 to begin the development of an implementation plan.

Minor Arterials - Interconnect with and augment the principal arterial system and provide service for trips of moderate length. Distributes traffic to geographic areas smaller than those served by the higher system, with more emphasis on service to abutting land uses. Generally, in the range of 5,000 to 15,000 vehicles per day. Number of lanes and type of median are directly related to traffic volumes and abutting land uses. Speedway Road, Regent Street, and Highland Avenue are minor arterials within the RN. Speedway Road and Regent Street move about 10,000 cars per day. Old University Avenue carries 6 transit routes and Speedway Road and Regent Street each carry a bus route. Highland Avenue carries over 5,000 cars per day. At the critical peak period Regent Street capacity is increased through curb lane parking restrictions during peak periods. Minor Arterial street guideline widths are 51 to 56 feet. RN minor arterial streets range in width from 36 feet to 48 feet.

Collectors - Connect local streets to the arterial street systems and serve residential neighborhoods with direct access to abutting land uses. Typically, two-lane streets generally carry in the range of 2,000 to 5,000 vehicles per day. Farley Avenue, Franklin Avenue, Regent Street west of the Speedway intersection, Allen Street, Breese Terrace, South Spooner Street, and Commonwealth Avenue are collector streets in the RN. Farley Avenue carries greater than 5,000 cars per day north of Kendall Avenue. The rest of our collector streets carry between 2,000 and 5,000 cars per day. Allen Street, Franklin Avenue, Breese Terrace, and Commonwealth Avenue all carry a bus route. Additionally, Breese terrace also carries two UW bus routes. Collector street guideline width is 52 feet. RN collector streets range from 32 feet to 42 feet.
Vehicular parking is permitted on most streets in Madison. Preferential parking districts have been established in some residential neighborhoods in response to externally generated impacts. The RN has a combination of public on-street and off-street parking and private off-street parking.

Madison is an acknowledged leader in bicycle planning and use. In 2015, the City earned Platinum certification from the League of American Bicyclists for bicycle friendliness. (https://smartgrowthamerica.org/program/national-complete-streets-coalition/)

There are 46 miles of bike paths, 112 miles of bike lanes, and 116 miles of signed bike routes in Madison. Bicycling is a safe, convenient, enjoyable and healthy mode of transportation in Madison, although many less experienced bicyclists may not feel comfortable on existing facilities, such as bike lanes not separated from traffic. Bike level of service maps indicate that most bike routes in the RN have scores between D and F (A to F scale, A being best). Bike demand heat maps also indicate that there is a much greater demand for facilities in the neighborhood than are available (Madison in Motion). An interactive bicycle map for the Madison area is available at

(https://www.cityofmadison.com/bikeMadison/planTrip/interactivemap.cfm).

Bicycle issues to be addressed include completing connections in the low-stress bicycling network, safety, and building a network that allows all ages and abilities (https://smartgrowthamerica.org/program/national-complete-streets-coalition/) to bike comfortably. Although mid-block links in the network may be comfortable, for many less-experienced bicyclists, intersections may serve as barriers to a safe and comfortable trip

The pedestrian system includes facilities designed solely for pedestrians (sidewalks) and facilities designed to be shared by pedestrians and bicyclists. However, pedestrians and bicyclists also need to use the street at every intersection, and those crossings need to be safe and comfortable. Some facilities are oriented toward basic circulation between destinations and other facilities are more recreational. Existing pedestrian circulation facilities in the RN consist of sidewalks available on almost every street classified as a “local street” and larger streets and off-street paths shared with bicyclists. Pedestrian issues to be addressed include improving safety for pedestrians, especially at street crosswalks, meeting the needs of seniors and those with personal mobility challenges, and providing accommodations in a comfortable and attractive environment.

The City of Madison and the UW are served by the Madison Metro transit system and the UW Transportation Services (http://www.cityofmadison.com/metro/annualreports/2014.pdf). There are 62 fixed bus routes which provided over 15 million rides in 2014. All buses include bike racks. A map of existing transit routes is shown at:(http://www.cityofmadison.com/metro/schedules/systemMaps.cfm.) 

Madison in Motion, the City of Madison’s Sustainable Transportation Master Plan, provides

a framework for future transportation decisions in the city, ensuring a future with improved walkability, bikability, transit availability. It envisions a compact city of walkable community nodes.

(http://www.cityofmadison.com/dpced/planning/transportationmasterplan/)


Specific streets issues and solutions

Changes to individual streets can range from simple community actions (e.g. crosswalks painted to represent the neighborhood), to City Council approved non-financial changes (e.g. parking time limits or regulations), to city budget approved facility construction activities. Every potential change has both positive and negative consequences for the range of transportation users. The range of potential changes and possible consequences will be described for seven heavily impacted streets within the neighborhood. Additionally, five important streets that feed into and/or border the neighborhood will be discussed in a less comprehensive manner.



Within Regent Neighborhood - Heavily Impacted Streets

University Avenue parallel to Campus Dr (1700-2600 blocks)

The incident report map indicates that about 25 % of reported incidents in the RN occur on this section of roadway. Most occur at either of the two ends of the street and almost all are pedestrian or bicycle safety related.



Issue: The off bound "ramp" (2600 block) that moves traffic from the 2700 block of University Avenue onto the 2600 block of University Avenue is quite wide and there are only two cut-away parking spots in this block. The street on this block does not physically signal a transition from the 35 mph zone in the 2700 block to the 25 mph zone of the 2500 block.

Possible citizen solutions: Install entering Regent Neighborhood signage with encouragement to slow down. There will be a slight cost associated with doing this. There is no associated con if the signs are appropriately sited.

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: 1) Paint yellow lines to indicate a narrower roadway. This would be a relatively simple way to slow eastbound traffic in this densifying area with increasing pedestrian traffic.

There is a slight cost associated with this action. There is no associated con. 2) Install benches and plantings in the pocket park to indicate pedestrian area. There is a slight cost associated with this activity. Encouraging pedestrian activity in this park could have related safety issues.


Possible fiscal city solutions: 1) Physically, reduce the width of the road in this block. There is an infrastructure cost. This would preclude adding parking or a protected bike lane. 2) Add parking to the south side of the block. This would be beneficial to nearby businesses and residences but there may not be sufficient room to add parking. 3) Add a protected bike lane to the block. This would facilitate bicycle travel into the neighborhood from the west. There would need to be a means of moving bicycle traffic from this entry point.4) Add a small roundabout at intersection with Grand Avenue. Traffic Engineering has said there is not room for this. 5) Add planters or other temporary barriers during the warm months. This would create a narrower field of view as well as physically narrow the roadway. Planters or other temporary items would need to be removed for winter and reinstalled in spring.

Issue: No bicycle infrastructure exists in the 2600 to 2200 blocks sometimes prompting bicyclists to use the sidewalks.

Possible citizen solutions: Bicyclists can be assertive in the use of the one lane in both directions. Many bicyclists do not feel safe in this situation. Bicyclists may travel one to two blocks south, on Farley Avenue or Grand Avenue, to the Kendall Avenue bike boulevard. While Kendall Avenue is also a shared roadway it has much less traffic than on University Avenue. A bike lane exists on University Avenue between Allen and Breese.

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: Approve a painted sharrow lane in both directions along this stretch. This may not do much to improve bicyclists' safety.

Possible fiscal city solutions: City could remove parking from one side of the street and add a protected bike lane that would provide a safe alternative for bicyclists. this would probably cause an uproar from local businesses and those who use those businesses.

Issue: The pedestrian crosswalk University Avenue at Allen Street is not marked well enough for the amount of pedestrian use.

Possible citizen solutions: pedestrians can be more assertive in their use of the crosswalk. Many would not feel safe doing this.

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: Use green paint to more clearly delineate the crosswalk or create a white striped crosswalk.

Possible fiscal city solutions: Unknown

Issue: Bicyclists traveling west from Campus Drive onto University Avenue near Breese Terrace have no physical separation from traffic and the unique traffic flow at this location often unsafely squeezes the bicyclist.

Possible citizen solutions: Bicyclists can be more assertive in their use of the lane. Many would not feel safe doing this.

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: Use yellow or green paint to more clearly delineate the bicyclist's lane across and through this intersection. Reduce auto lanes by one east of this intersection and use paint to create a clear wide bicycle lane east of the intersection and across the intersection.

Possible fiscal city solutions: Provide a curb to protect the bicycle lane from auto traffic.

Issue: There are a number of driveways that enter University Avenue on the 2300 to 2500 blocks that may cause unsafe conditions for bicyclists and pedestrians,

Possible citizen solutions: Unknown

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: Unknown

Possible fiscal city solutions: As development occurs, reduce number of driveways and construct center lane medians as in the 1800 and 1900 blocks.

Issue: The crosswalk that moves pedestrians and bicyclists from the neighborhood to the Ashman Memorial pedestrian bridge to the UW campus is often not headed by motorists.

Possible citizen solutions: Change yellow flashing lights to red.

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: Use green or red paint to better delineate the crossing.

Possible fiscal city solutions: Add additional warning lighting.

All traffic solutions decided upon should comport with the University Avenue Corridor Plan:

(http://www.cityofmadison.com/planning/OldUniversity/documents/UAC_Plan%20June2014.pdf)
Franklin Avenue from Regent Street to University Avenue

About 10% of reported incidents occur on this street section most are pedestrian crosswalk concerns and the other is confusion for drivers at the three way stop at Regent Street.



Issues: Franklin Street is used to as a neighborhood cut through between Speedway Road and Regent Street and University Avenue as a means to avoid traffic conditions on both Regent Street and Highland Avenue. Automobiles often drive well over the speed limit (City of Madison 2010).

Possible citizen solutions: 1) Install entering Regent Neighborhood sign. Will need to find a suitable location and there will be some costs to the RNA. 2) Encourage neighbors to put up slow down signs. Will require action to occasionally move signs. May have limited effect, especially on most egregious law breakers. 3) Place children's toys/bikes out, and move them around, as cautionary element. Will require action to acquire and move the toys. May have limited effect, especially on most egregious law breakers. 4) Have neighbors park their vehicles near to the speed islands as legally allowed to cause traffic to slow in those locations. 5) Painted crosswalks to make them more visible and to indicate entry into a neighborhood environment.

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: 1) Enforcement of existing regulations - will require police to use resources here and not elsewhere. May move vehicles to an adjoining cut through streets (Farley, Grand, Highland). 2) Addition of speed board. Will require city action and perhaps have only a limited short term impact. 3) Paint can also be added at the intersections to make the road seem narrower. This will slow traffic, allow for easier crossings for pedestrians, yet does not impact emergency vehicles, bus traffic, and street maintenance operations (plowing, street sweeping, etc.).

Possible fiscal city solutions: Add a bike line southbound (uphill) from University Avenue to Regent Street. Will require city action and some financial cost related to engineering the solution. Downhill bicycle traffic can generally match driver speeds, but uphill bicyclists require space to feel like they are not being tail gated or squeezed next to parked cars.

Farley Avenue from Regent Street to University Avenue

About 10% of reported incidents occur on this street. Most are bicycle crossing related and one is automobile related at University Avenue.



Issues: Farley Street is used to as a neighborhood cut through between Regent Street and University Avenue as a means to avoid traffic conditions on both Regent Street and Highland Avenue. Automobiles often drive well over the speed limit (provide traffic study reference).

Possible citizen solutions: 1) Install entering Regent Neighborhood sign. Will need to find a suitable location and will require some costs to RNA. 2) Encourage neighbors to put up slow down signs. Will require action to occasionally move signs. May have limited effect, especially on most egregious law breakers. 3) Place children's toys/bikes out, and move them around, as cautionary element. Will require action to acquire and move the toys. May have limited effect, especially on most egregious law breakers. 4) Have neighbors park their vehicles near to the speed islands as legally allowed to cause traffic to slow in those locations.

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: 1) Enforcement of existing regulations - will require police to use resources here and not elsewhere. May move vehicles to an adjoining cut through street (Franklin, Grand, Highland). 2) Addition of short term speed board. Will require city action and perhaps have only a limited short term impact. 3) Paint can also be added at the intersections to make the road seem narrower. This will slow traffic, allow for easier crossings for pedestrians, yet does not impact emergency vehicles and street maintenance operations (plowing, street sweeping, etc.). 4) Slightly extend the red light time for northbound traffic at the Farley/Campus drive intersection. This will have the net effect of discouraging drivers from getting congested in the RN and providing additional time for pedestrian crossings.

Possible fiscal city changes: 1) Add blue slow signs on Islands at either end. 2) Addition of permanent speed board. Will require city action and perhaps have only a limited short term impact.

Highland Avenue from Regent Street to Campus Drive underpass

A couple incidents, one bicycle and one pedestrian, occurred at the University Avenue intersection.



Issues: Highland Avenue is used to as a neighborhood cut through between Regent Street and University Avenue to access the hospitals and West Campus area. Automobiles often drive well over the speed limit (provide traffic study reference).

Possible citizen solutions: 1) Install entering Regent Neighborhood sign. Will need to find a suitable location and will require some costs to RNA. 2) Encourage neighbors to put up slow down signs. Will require action to occasionally move signs. May have limited effect, especially on most egregious law breakers. 3) Place children's toys/bikes out, and move them around, as cautionary element. Will require action to acquire and move the toys. May have limited effect, especially on most egregious law breakers.

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: 1) Enforcement of existing regulations - will require police to use resources here and not elsewhere. May move vehicles to an adjoining cut through street (Farley, Grand, Franklin). 2) Addition of short term speed board. Will require city action and perhaps have only a limited short term impact. 3) Paint can also be added at the intersections to make the road seem narrower. This will slow traffic, allow for easier crossings for pedestrians, yet does not impact emergency vehicles and street maintenance operations (plowing, street sweeping, etc.).

Possible fiscal city changes: 1) Addition of permanent speed board. Will require city action and perhaps have only a limited short term impact. 2) Traffic Islands were approved by city traffic engineering as a part of the neighborhood traffic management program (NTMP or traffic calming program), but the islands were not approved by property owners and businesses. The islands would have required removal of several parking spots.

Issues: When leaving the hospitals on Highland Avenue or other businesses in the area there is a ramp heading west on University Avenue but no ramp heading East on Campus Drive. This forces drivers going East to enter the RN.

Possible citizen solutions: 1) Encourage or incentivize hospital and other employees to use public transportation. 2) Encourage hospital and other employees and visitors to head East on Campus Drive by using University Bay Drive or Observatory Drive.

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: Unknown

Possible fiscal city changes: 1) Add a Eastbound ramp at Highland, however, this is very difficult with available city owned land. Another option would be to add an Eastbound ramp from Walnut Street and encourage hospital staff, visitors, and others use Walnut Street off of Observatory Drive. 2) Return Campus Drive to grade and create intersections for Eastbound turns at Highland Avenue and Walnut Street.

Allen Street from the Southwest commuter path overpass to University Avenue

About 20% of the incidents reported occur on Allen Street, these are bicycle and pedestrian safety issues and most occur near Regent Street.



Issues: Allen Street is used to as a neighborhood cut through between Monroe Street, Commonwealth Avenue, Regent Street, and University Avenue. Allen Street is a bus corridor and also one of only two streets that connects the Monroe Street corridor with University Avenue. These roles mean that larger vehicles - both buses and emergency response vehicles, as well as delivery trucks, need to be able to move freely. Automobiles often drive well over the speed limit and many dangerous situations and crashes between automobiles and bicyclists/pedestrians occur along this route (see incident map).

Possible citizen solutions: 1) Install entering Regent Neighborhood sign. Will need to find a suitable location and will require some costs to RNA. 2) Encourage neighbors to put up slow down signs. Will require action to occasionally move signs. May have limited effect, especially on most egregious law breakers. 3) Place children's toys/bikes out, and move them around, as cautionary element. Will require action to acquire and move the toys. May have limited effect, especially on most egregious law breakers.

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: 1) Enforcement of existing regulations - will require police to use resources here and not elsewhere. May move vehicles to an adjoining cut through street (Farley, Grand, Highland). 2) Addition of speed board. Will require city action and perhaps have only a limited short term impact. 3) More frequent and more eye catching painting of crosswalks.

Possible fiscal city changes: 1) Traffic calming measures were approved by city traffic engineering as a part of the neighborhood traffic management program (NTMP or traffic calming program), but were not approved by property owners and businesses. However, this street was selected for traffic calming ten years ago, as with Highland, but there was disagreement between city staff and neighbors about the type of infrastructure, and the desirability of the infrastructure, that could be installed.

Regent Street from Speedway Road to Monroe Street

About a 35% of the reported incidents, pedestrian and bicycle safety related, occur along Regent street, most in the vicinity of the High School and Allen Street.



Issues: Regent Street is a minor arterial that moves morning traffic from the west side to downtown, the University and the hospitals. In the evening this minor arterial moves traffic home to the west side from downtown, the University and the hospitals. Parking is prohibited on the South side of the street during morning rush hour and the north side of the street during evening rush hour. The street is considerably narrower than is suggested for minor arterial routes (42 versus 56 feet). Regent Street is a bus corridor and includes the West High School property near Speedway Road, causing much pedestrian and bicycle congestion during automobile rush hours. As a minor arterial, larger vehicles - both buses and emergency response vehicles, as well as delivery trucks, need to be able to move freely.

Randall School is also located on Regent Street, and morning peak hour traffic causes safety problems for both parents and children going to the school. Despite a traffic signal at Spooner and Regent, a crossing guard is still required to protect the crosswalk from careless drivers. A walkable school area -- both West High School and Randall -- is a significant attraction for the neighborhood.

Many dangerous situations and crashes between automobiles and bicyclists/pedestrians occur along this route (see incident map).

Possible citizen solutions: 1) Install entering Regent Neighborhood sign. Will need to find a suitable location and will require some costs to RNA. 2) Encourage neighbors to put up slow down signs. Will require action to occasionally move signs. May have limited effect, especially on most egregious law breakers.

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: 1) Enforcement of existing regulations - will require police to use resources here and not elsewhere. May move vehicles to an adjoining cut through street (Farley, Grand, Highland, Allen). However, fines for speeding and failure to yield to pedestrians in a crosswalk are very steep in school zones, and occasional enforcement may make an impression on drivers who pass through this area daily. 2) More frequent and more eye catching painting of crosswalks.

Possible fiscal city changes: 1) Addition of speed board. Will require city action and perhaps have only a limited short-term impact.

Breese Terrace from the Southwest commuter path to University Avenue

There have not been any traffic incidents reported along this street.



Issues: Breese Terrace is used to as a neighborhood cut through between Monroe Street and Regent Street and University Avenue to connect to the west end of the campus. Automobiles often drive over the speed limit.

Possible citizen solutions: 1) Install entering Regent Neighborhood sign. Will need to find a suitable location and will require some costs to RNA. 2) Encourage neighbors to put up slow down signs. Will require action to occasionally move signs. May have limited effect, especially on most egregious law breakers. 3) Have neighbors park their vehicles near to the speed islands as legally allowed to cause traffic to slow in those locations. 4) More frequent and more eye catching painting of crosswalks.

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: 1) Enforcement of existing regulations - will require police to use resources here and not elsewhere. May move vehicles to an adjoining cut through street (Allen, Spooner). 2) Addition of short-term speed board. Will require city action and perhaps have only a limited short term impact. 3) Add blue slow signs on Islands at either end.

Possible fiscal city changes: 1) Addition of speed board. Will require city action and perhaps have only a limited short-term impact.

Important Streets that Border or Feed Regent Neighborhood Streets

University Avenue from Franklin Avenue to Midvale Boulevard

Issue: Crossings of the roadway are a significant problem for pedestrians and bicyclists, and this corridor serves as a major barrier separating the campus and Shorewood Hills on the north from the residential and commercial areas to the south. The road and adjacent commercial buildings are currently configured almost exclusively for motorist access. A recent bicyclist death brings attention to this issue. We will need to work with Shorewood Hills, Sunset Village, and other neighborhood groups and UW and UW Hospital to implement any solutions.



Possible citizen solutions: Unknown

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: Enforcement of existing regulations

Possible fiscal city changes: reduce speed limit, install speed boards, push for reallocation of road space by providing exclusive lanes for BRT and protected bike lanes. Need to review current planning document with consideration of a road diet.

Issue: Because of a lack of bicycle facilities on this section of University Ave, bicyclists frequently use the sidewalk on the south side. The roadway is frightening for all but the most fearless riders. This causes both conflicts with pedestrians - especially at transit stops - and also hazards for bicyclists from drivers who either turn to or from University Avenue or do not stop before entering the crosswalk from a side street. This is an especially serious problem at the intersection of Farley Street and University Avenue, where many northbound drivers are turning right onto University Avenue. Other intersections without traffic signals are difficult to cross by foot or bicycle. This actually leads to more traffic, as residents to the south of University Avenue drive short distances because crossing the roadway is so perilous.

Possible citizen solutions: Bicyclists use the roadway more overtly

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: Better signage for bike travel, including that riding on the sidewalk is illegal

Possible fiscal city changes: Include protected bike lanes in redevelopment plan as well as completion of multiuse trail on north side of road

Issue: The amount of traffic and speed of the traffic is excessive due to limited bicycling infrastructure and rapid transit options.

Possible citizen solutions: Unknown

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: Speed signs and enforcement

Possible fiscal city changes: include BRT and protected bike lanes in redevelopment plan

Issue: Not enough indication drivers are entering into a neighborhood. Too many people use autos to access the hospitals and UW.



Possible citizen solutions: Add signage at neighborhood entry points. promote increased use of mass transit

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: Enhancements to pedestrian crosswalks near entry points to neighborhood

Possible fiscal city changes: Change of road width as enter, small roundabout to slow traffic, BRT development

A traffic and infrastructure study was done by the city in 2014. We feel that the study did not pursue strategies that were more progressive at that time and that redoing the study is called for.



http://www.cityofmadison.com/trafficengineering/nearWestTransportationStudy.cfm
Commonwealth Avenue from Monroe Street to Allen Street

Issue: Bike path crossing

Possible citizen solutions: Neighborhood drivers need to yield

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: Enhancements to the crossing, including flashing lights

Possible fiscal city changes: None

Issue: Odd intersection at Allen

Possible citizen solutions: Caution by neighbors

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: Enhanced crosswalks

Possible fiscal city changes: Traffic light or roundabout

Issue: Cut through traffic

Possible citizen solutions: Neighbors can drive more slowly

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: Reduce speed limit and add speed board

Possible fiscal city changes: Raised bike crossing

University Avenue from East Campus

Issue: Strange two lanes to one lane change as entering neighborhood causes bicycles to be squeezed as they enter the neighborhood

Possible citizen solutions: Drive carefully

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: Enhanced bike lane marking

Possible fiscal city changes: Reduce from 2 to 1 lane and add protected bike lane

Issue: Not enough indication that are entering a pedestrian neighborhood

Possible citizen solutions: Enhanced neighborhood signage

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: Enhanced pedestrian crosswalks and bicycle lane markings

Possible fiscal city changes: Flashing crosswalk lighting

Issue: Many pedestrians and bicyclists due to proximity to UW

Possible citizen solutions: Unknown

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: Enhanced pedestrian crosswalks and bicycle lane markings

Possible fiscal city changes: Flashing crosswalk lighting. Protected bike lanes

(This area is being recommended for some changes as part of the UW campus master plan, including two-way protected bike lanes.) http://masterplan.wisc.edu/

Monroe Street from Odana Road to Regent Street

Issue: Speeding

Possible citizen solutions: Slow down

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: Better enforcement

Possible fiscal city changes: Add pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure

Issue: Extra lanes during rush hour

Possible citizen solutions: Do not try and pass turning cars on the right and block other cars from doing so

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: Enhanced pedestrian and bicycle markings and signage. Speed limit enforcement

Possible fiscal city changes: Redesign to three lanes that include a center turn lane and no additional rush hour lane. Redesign to include additional bike and pedestrian infrastructure

Issue: Heavy pedestrian and bicycle traffic due to business district and UW

Possible citizen solutions: Drive slowly, do not use right lane to pass turning cars

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: Enhanced pedestrian and bicycle markings and signage. Speed limit enforcement

Possible fiscal city changes: Redesign to three lanes that include a center turn lane and no additional rush hour lane. Redesign to include additional bike and pedestrian infrastructure

Speedway Road/Mineral Point Road from Midvale Boulevard to Regent Street

Issue: Strange intersection at Regent Street

Possible citizen solutions: Drive slowly

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: Enhanced signage and markings. Reduced speed limit

Possible fiscal city changes: Add a roundabout time feature or traffic light

Issue: High School location

Possible citizen solutions: Drivers exercise extreme care. Training of high schoolers to exercise caution

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: Enhanced pedestrian and bicycle crossings. Reduce speed limit and enhanced enforcement

Possible fiscal city changes: Redesign that includes more protected pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure. Addition of flashing lights. Reduce width of roadway so that road does not look like a highway. Protected bike lanes in both directions would provide a connection to Glenway and the SW Path.

Issue: Increased speeds as drivers come down the hill towards Allen, especially from the East

Possible citizen solutions: Drivers slow down and do not attempt to pass turning vehicle on the right

Possible non-fiscal city solutions: Enhanced enforcement, signage, pedestrian infrastructure and reduced speed limit

Possible fiscal city changes: No additional rush hour lane and enhanced bicycle infrastructure

Map showing heavily impacted streets within the neighborhood (green) and important neighborhood feeder streets (orange) that are described in detail above.


Outreach plan

In order to move towards a more pedestrian and bicycle friendly transportation plan in the Regent neighborhood and surrounding area it will be important to stimulate a groundswell of support to encourage city staff and elected officials to reform our transportation systems on behalf of pedestrians and bicyclists. Need to get neighbors involved and to encourage planned activities (such as Vancouver is doing with their hospital for bike to work, etc.)

Outreach will need to include the following constituencies:

Regent neighbors and the RNA; Neighborhood schools (West High, Blessed Sacrament, Randall) and their PTAs; Nearby neighborhood associations and the Village of Shorewood Hills; the University of Wisconsin administrators, staff, and students; the University of Wisconsin Hospital and VA Hospital administrators, employees, and patients/families; relevant city of Madison departments (planning, traffic, police, etc.); pedestrian and bicycling advocacy groups; and elected Madison officials.

Each of these constituencies will need to be addressed and motivated in an appropriate manner.

1) Regent neighbors and the RNA - use various social media, newsletters, and relevant public meetings to inform and interest neighbors in becoming supportive of our efforts and frame these efforts as quality of life issues. a) continue to provide quarterly newsletter updates and invite more to join our committee, b) continue to report progress and plans and to and gain support from the RNA board, c) develop a means to capture neighborhood safety occurrences and best method to quantify and advertise that information, d) use the RNA listserve and Next Door to report on efforts and encourage involvement, e) develop plans to provide ongoing overview of our activities on the RNA website and facebook page, f) provide progress reports to other local news media, g) engage neighbors in the public awareness and outreach fields to provide their expertise to our efforts.

2) Neighborhood schools and their PTAs - continuously inform the schools and PTAs of our efforts and encourage their involvement. Request our participation in any associated efforts they are undertaking.

3) Nearby neighborhood associations - continually inform each of the surrounding associations (Dudgeon Monroe, Sunset Hills, Vilas, Rocky Bluff, Vanchamasshe, Westmoreland, Sunset Village) and The Village of Shorewood Hills, of our activities and encourage their involvement. Attach ourselves to any similar effort being organized by these neighbors.

4) University of Wisconsin - work through existing channels on the RNA board (Joint West Committee representative) and develop relationships with leaders in the administration, staff, and students. Continuously update these groups on our efforts. Become involved in appropriate efforts of theirs (UW campus master plan).

5) UW and VA hospitals - connect with administrators and staff leaders to inform them of our efforts. Work to develop programs with them that align with our efforts. Discuss Vancouver area hospital calming measures.

6) City Staff - Develop a list of important city department (traffic, planning, police, health, etc.) leaders, and provide them information about our efforts and request their advice to best achieve our objectives. Request that we be involved in any of their efforts that interface with our objectives. Work to build staff relationships that are aligned with our goals and objectives. Participate in related public meetings.

7) Pedestrian and Bicycling advocacy groups - Develop a list of important local, regional and national leaders. Connect with these leaders and learn from their efforts and expertise.

8) Madison elected officials - work with our city alder and other alders that support our objectives. Meet with mayor and his staff to inform them of our efforts and to keep abreast of their efforts.

A general timeline for outreach engagement:

1) Become involved in appropriate ongoing efforts of these various constituencies (Madison in Motion, Monroe redesign, Dudgeon safety task force, UW Master Plan, Street reconstruction planning, etc.). Learn about various ongoing advocacy group efforts. Involve neighbors in capture of safety occurrences.

2) Inform and engage RNA board, neighbors, schools, nearby neighborhood associations, city departments, and elected officials in review and comment on our neighborhood transportation plan. Improve the plan with input from all constituents. Started February 2017

3) Develop contacts with University and hospitals and inform them of our transportation plan and their part in achieving the goals of the plan. Best done through the Joint West Committee.

4) Engage outreach experts in a social and local media campaign. Campaign should include a variety of actions that each constituency can participate in.





Yüklə 61,92 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə