Roses in Mississippi



Yüklə 326,04 Kb.

səhifə1/10
tarix04.02.2018
ölçüsü326,04 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10


OSES IN              ISSISSIPPI

R M




OSES IN              ISSISSIPPI

R M


The Allure, Lore and History of Roses

The rose is one of the most popular flowering plants in the

world. Its beauty, fragrance, and diversity provide value be-

yond our physical needs. That is why gardeners give promi-

nent space to roses in their gardens and spend time, labor, and

money to have roses in their lives. And gardeners challenge

themselves not only to grow roses but to grow them better

than their neighbors. We humans are very interesting crea-

tures.

Rose species are native to the northern hemisphere, from



eastern Asia to western North America. The beginnings of

rose domestication are unclear, but it is likely that centers of

cultivation  began  in  early  Chinese,  Persian,  Greek,  and

Roman cultures. Travel and trade among regions surely in-

cluded the barter of valuable roses. The establishment of rose

gardens led to natural and experimental crosses between the

roses of the east and the west. Garden roses were diversified

well before they came to North America. These roses followed

human migration westward, and some of their progeny now

live alongside native species and on old homestead sites and

cemeteries.

In other words, trading and business have always been

at the heart of garden rose development. The wealthy sent out

plant explorers to search for exotic plants for beauty and com-

merce. Breeders and growers of roses produced plants that

met aristocrats’ and tycoons’ plant needs and obsessions. 

Today, breeders continue to define rose perfection. Often

they promote one characteristic to the detriment of others.

Many cultivars that are front page headlines today will dis-

appear within a year or two of dismal performance. But good

roses endure and thrive. That is why old garden roses do so

well: they are the survivors. The same will happen with mod-

ern roses. Gardeners will continue to select roses that grow

well and make people happy.

Considering adding roses to your garden? Here are some tips for success:

1. Choose a planting location. Roses should receive a minimum of 6 hours of direct sunlight daily. Be sure the soil is fertile 

and well-drained.

2. Select cultivars or species that thrive in the climate and soil conditions you have and that can resist pests and diseases 

that are common to your site conditions.

3. Decide how much time and effort you are willing to invest in controlling disease before making your rose choices. Select 

cultivars and species based on your time and effort commitment.

4. Decide if you are comfortable using chemicals or prefer to use an organic approach to growing roses before choosing 

which roses to grow. Select cultivars and species based on your maintenance direction.

5. Buy vigorous, healthy plants from a reliable source. Cultivate plants using proper pruning, mulching, watering, and 

fertilization practices.

Getting to Know Your Roses

Roses are grouped into classes to make sense of the great diversity of known cultivars. Groupings are subjective and major

rose societies sometimes group cultivars differently. The following list describes some commonly accepted groupings. Not all

classes of roses grow well in the Southeast. Those classes will be noted in their description where they are listed.

Species and Old Garden Rose Classes: Prior to 1867



Species roses 

are the basis on which the garden rose is developed. Knowing where these species come from helps us to un-

derstand where genetic tolerance to heat and cold come from, as well as various plant characteristics. They fall into four basic ge-

ographic groups. Not all rose species are listed, just those often genetically important to commercial or garden rose development.

3



ASiAn SpecieS 

Southern Asia



R. chinensis 



R. laevigata 



R. bracteata 



R. banksiae 



R. multiflora 



R. wichuraiana 



R. brunonii 



R. filipes 



R. moyesii 



northern Asia



R. rugosa



Middle eastern species 



R. foetida (R. foetida and its forms are important 

breeding roses for yellow flower color and thought to 

carry genetic susceptibility to blackspot.)



R. hemisphaerica



R. damascena (R. damascena and its forms are an 

important source of attar of roses.)



R. centifolia 



europeAn SpecieS 

northern europe



R. canina (Dog Rose)



R. eglanteria (Sweetbriar Rose)



R. villosa (Apple Rose)



R. pimpinellifolia (Scotch Rose) 



R. arvensis (Field Rose)



central and eastern europe



R. gallica 



Southern europe and the Mediterranean



R. moschata

American species did not directly contribute to the develop-

ment of old garden rose classes. However, R. virginianaR. car-



olina and R. palustris (Swamp Rose) are garden plants in their

own  right.  Other  species  exist  but  are  found  outside  the

Southeast.

Climbing species roses are distinct and have their own groups

of hybrids. Banksian roses are a small group originating from

China. They were introduced into the Southeast in the early

19th century. ‘Lady Banks Rose’ (R. banksiae lutea) is the most

widely seen rose of this group in Mississippi. Banksian roses

are very large climbers that are semi-evergreen and thornless. 

GAllicA  roSeS

(‘rose  of  provins’)

are  an  ancient

group of roses derived from R. gallica, native to central and

southern Europe. They are thought to have been grown by

ancient Greeks and Romans and possibly earlier. The shrub

is upright in growth habit, about 3 to 4 feet tall, freely sucker-

ing with many small, bristly thorns.  Flowers are pink, 2 to 3

inches in diameter, highly fragrant and followed by round,

red hips. Foliage is rough, dark green and oval. 

3Lady 


Banks Rose

4





Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə