SelSus 5 White paper on sensor clouds



Yüklə 146,93 Kb.

tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü146,93 Kb.


 

WP3 SelSus 

D3.5 White Paper on Sensor Clouds 

Version 2.0 

FoF.NMP.2013-8

 

 



Page 1 of 18 

 

© SelSus Consortium 



 

 

 



 

 

 



FoF.NMP.2013-8 

 

SelSus 

 

Health Monitoring and Life-Long Capability Management for 

SELf-SUStaining Manufacturing Systems

 

 



 

Deliverable: 

 

White Paper on Sensor Clouds (D3.5) 

 

 

 

Author: João Reis, ISR, jpcreis@fe.up.pt 

Start date of project: 01.09.2013   

Duration: 48 months 

Due date of deliverable: 31.08.2016                            

Actual submission date: 12.12.2016 

 

 



Project co-funded by the European Commission within the  

Seventh Framework Programme (2007-2013

Dissemination level 

PU 

Public 


 X 

PP 

Restricted to other programme participants  

(including the Commission Services) 

 

RE 

Restricted to a group specified by the consortium  

(including the Commission Services) 

 

CO 

Confidential, only for members of the consortium  

(excluding the Commission Services) 

 

 

 

 



 

WP3 SelSus 

D3.5 White Paper on Sensor Clouds 

Version 2.0 

FoF.NMP.2013-8

 

 



Page 2 of 18 

 

© SelSus Consortium 



Document History 

Ver.  Date 

Change History 

Author 

Organisation 

1.0 


15.08.2016 

ISR content 

Joao Reis 

ISR 


1.1 

20.08.2016 

ADP content 

Knut Voigtländer 

ADP 

2.0 


7.09.2016 

Final Revision 

Joao Reis 

ISR 


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 

Distribution List 

Date 

Issue 

Group 

31.08.2016 

Revision 

WP3 project team 

02.12.2016 

Distribution 

SelSus Consortium 

12.12.2016 

Acceptance 

SelSus Coordinator 

12.12.2016 

Submission 

European Commission 

 



 

WP3 SelSus 

D3.5 White Paper on Sensor Clouds 

Version 2.0 

FoF.NMP.2013-8

 

 



Page 2 of 18 

 

© SelSus Consortium 



Document History 

Ver.  Date 

Change History 

Author 

Organisation 

1.0 


15.08.2016 

ISR content 

Joao Reis 

ISR 


1.1 

20.08.2016 

ADP content 

Knut Voigtländer 

ADP 

2.0 


7.09.2016 

Final Revision 

Joao Reis 

ISR 


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 

Distribution List 

Date 

Issue 

Group 

31.08.2016 

Revision 

WP3 project team 

02.12.2016 

Distribution 

SelSus Consortium 

12.12.2016 

Acceptance 

SelSus Coordinator 

12.12.2016 

Submission 

European Commission 

 



 

WP3 SelSus 

D3.5 White Paper on Sensor Clouds 

Version 2.0 

FoF.NMP.2013-8

 

 



Page 2 of 18 

 

© SelSus Consortium 



Document History 

Ver.  Date 

Change History 

Author 

Organisation 

1.0 


15.08.2016 

ISR content 

Joao Reis 

ISR 


1.1 

20.08.2016 

ADP content 

Knut Voigtländer 

ADP 

2.0 


7.09.2016 

Final Revision 

Joao Reis 

ISR 


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 

Distribution List 

Date 

Issue 

Group 

31.08.2016 

Revision 

WP3 project team 

02.12.2016 

Distribution 

SelSus Consortium 

12.12.2016 

Acceptance 

SelSus Coordinator 

12.12.2016 

Submission 

European Commission 

 



 

WP3 SelSus 

D3.5 White Paper on Sensor Clouds 

Version 2.0 

FoF.NMP.2013-8

 

 



Page 2 of 18 

 

© SelSus Consortium 



Document History 

Ver.  Date 

Change History 

Author 

Organisation 

1.0 


15.08.2016 

ISR content 

Joao Reis 

ISR 


1.1 

20.08.2016 

ADP content 

Knut Voigtländer 

ADP 

2.0 


7.09.2016 

Final Revision 

Joao Reis 

ISR 


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 

Distribution List 

Date 

Issue 

Group 

31.08.2016 

Revision 

WP3 project team 

02.12.2016 

Distribution 

SelSus Consortium 

12.12.2016 

Acceptance 

SelSus Coordinator 

12.12.2016 

Submission 

European Commission 

 



 

WP3 SelSus 

D3.5 White Paper on Sensor Clouds 

Version 2.0 

FoF.NMP.2013-8

 

 



Page 2 of 18 

 

© SelSus Consortium 



Document History 

Ver.  Date 

Change History 

Author 

Organisation 

1.0 


15.08.2016 

ISR content 

Joao Reis 

ISR 


1.1 

20.08.2016 

ADP content 

Knut Voigtländer 

ADP 

2.0 


7.09.2016 

Final Revision 

Joao Reis 

ISR 


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 

Distribution List 

Date 

Issue 

Group 

31.08.2016 

Revision 

WP3 project team 

02.12.2016 

Distribution 

SelSus Consortium 

12.12.2016 

Acceptance 

SelSus Coordinator 

12.12.2016 

Submission 

European Commission 

 



 

WP3 SelSus 

D3.5 White Paper on Sensor Clouds 

Version 2.0 

FoF.NMP.2013-8

 

 



Page 7 of 18 

 

© SelSus Consortium 



SelComp Concept 

 

The SelComp concept was primarily developed to create a representation of the 



operational  shop-floor  equipment  as  a  way  to  easily  acquire  the  generated  data  and 

synchronize  it  with  a  Cloud  system.  For  that  purpose,  a  base  technology  for  device 

discovery  and  data  exchange  was  explored,  with  support  for  both  Java  and  C# 

programming languages. After a thorough analysis, these requirements were fulfilled by 

using the Universal Plug’n’Play (UPnP) architecture. It’s flexible implementation of publish-

subscribe pattern by using both UPnP Control Point (receiver) and UPnP Device (sender) 

allowed  for  the  quick  implementation  of  the  base  template  of  the  SelComp.  The 

development of this template was supported by a set of tools available to implement the 

wrapping technology for all the equipment. Furthermore, the SelComp template is easily 

adaptable  according  to  the  specificities  and  necessities  of  each  partner  present  in  the 

project consortium. Since different partners operate in different markets, this requirement 

was contemplated beforehand. 

Based  on  the  fact  that  the  main  objective  of  the  SelSus  project  is  to  explore 

concepts  like  Condition-based  Monitoring  and  Machine  Diagnostics,  two  major  types  of 

shop-floor equipment are considered: 1) Machines / Controllers (Machine SelComp) and 

2) Wireless Sensor Networks (Sensor SelComp). This distinction between machine and 

sensors  is  nowadays  critical  in  industry,  based  on  the  fact  that  there  are  operating 

machines that are not prepared to collect data from its own process, which impairs the use 

of  complex  methods  to,  e.g.  infer  any  deviation  from  the  normal  process  behaviour. 

Therefore, the use of additional sensors that 1) do not influence the process itself, 2) are 

quick  to  deploy  and  reconfigurable  when  process  requirements  change  and  3)  are  fully 

integrated with a data visualization / analysis platform was the key point explored in the 

Sensor Cloud technology developed in SelSus project. 

Based  on  this,  the  next  sections  will  explain  the  main  innovative  features  that 

compose  this  Sensor  Cloud  technology,  starting  with  the  main  building  blocks  of  the 

Sensor SelComp such as: 

 

1)  Dynamic Modular Software Reconfiguration that allows to change the data 



treatment on-the-fly even before data is synchronized with the Sensor Cloud; 

2)  Flexible Sensor Integration solution that allows to graphically develop an 

interpreter of raw byte data packet at the gateway level for automatic data 

acquisition; and; 

3)  Statistical Analysis section to detail some of the potentialities of using 

certain methods and algorithms to analyse Machine and Sensor data, 

available at the Sensor Cloud level, and can be used in the reconfiguration 

process of the Sensor SelComp. 

 

 



 

WP3 SelSus 

D3.5 White Paper on Sensor Clouds 

Version 2.0 

FoF.NMP.2013-8

 

 



Page 8 of 18 

 

© SelSus Consortium 





Sensor SelComp

 

The  SelSus  Component  concept  (SelComp)  envisages  to  create  an  innovative 

smart  component,  with  enhanced  reconfiguration,  sensing,  decision  making  and 

collaborative capabilities. 

These smart components are capable of providing a quick response in real-time 

scenarios  and  to  collaborate  in  synergy  with  other  entities  while  present  in  complex 

industrial  scenarios;  such  as  Industrial  Cyber  Physical  Systems  (Industrial  CPS).  By 

combining the capabilities of reconfigurable software, machine to machine communication 

and sensing, this solution is capable of delivering specific and specialized computational 

analysis  with  a  great  degree  of  flexibility.

 

A  tentative  of  definition,  led  by  the  smart 



components community is: 

 

“Smart Components in manufacturing are components which incorporate functions of 



self-description, communication, sensing and control in order to collaborate with other 

smart components, analyse a situation, make decisions based on the available data and 

modify their behaviour through feedback”. 

 

 

 

Figure 2 – Sensor SelComp Building Blocks

 

 

 

The  proposed solution takes  advantage from the  Internet  of Things  (IoT)  advent 



when in regard to the base technologies adopted. The advantages of such solution are 

countless. 

Economically  speaking, the  hardware solutions adopted  are  low  cost  and  widely 

employed  in  recent  smart  manufacturing  systems.  Low  cost  embedded  hardware 

platforms,  such  as  RaspberryPi  and  Beaglebone  Black,  provide  the  necessary 

computational  power,  sensor  interfacing  and  communication  capabilities. The  market  of 

low cost sensors has also a wide range of products for the measurement of a large set of 

physical properties with several degrees of precision. 

From a technological and state of the art point of view, by adopting IoT hardware 

and software solutions, the SelComp solution is taking profit of cutting edge technology 

and contributing to the creation of standardized technology.  



 

WP3 SelSus 

D3.5 White Paper on Sensor Clouds 

Version 2.0 

FoF.NMP.2013-8

 

 



Page 9 of 18 

 

© SelSus Consortium 



The Sensor SelComp architecture is illustrated in  

Figure  2.  The  component  is  fully  modular  and  each  module  can  be  updated  by 

deploying a new plugin in the system. 

Analogous to the plugins, but for different purposes are the JS (JavaScript) Modules and 



Java Modules. These are data treatment modules, which perform analysis on data, e.g. 

Neural Networks or Control Charts. These modules are “write once, run everywhere”. Once 

developed, these files can run in any Sensor SelComp. The modules are maintained in the 

Sensor  SelComp  file  system,  and  the  SelSus  Cloud  controls  what  data  processing 

modules are present and running in each Sensor SelComp.  

Each block controls a specific functionality and the system is mainly divided in three core 

functionalities. 

North  Gate  and  SelSus  Cloud  share  the  same  ontology.  The  North  Gate  is 

responsible  to  handle  Cloud  interactions.  The  Sensor  SelComp  exposes  through  this 

interface  its  services  to  the  network  and  the  SelSus  Cloud  is  aware  of  all  the  services 

available.  There  are  four  static  services  which  the  cloud  (or  external  components)  can 

invoke: 

  Internal Structure Reconfiguration; 



  Submit Data Processing Modules; 

  Submit System Plugins; 



  Submit Sensor Parsers. 

 

Let us discuss in more detail the Internal Structure Reconfiguration since it is the 



main innovative functionality that drives the Sensor SelComp internal data processingThe 

core of the Sensor SelComp is composed by services. The SelSus Cloud, a Sensor or an 

External Component is virtualized and treated as a service which provides and/or receives 

data.  The  Data  Processing  modules  presented  can  be  instantiated.  The  instance  is 

transformed into a service, which provides data after being treated. 

 

 



 

Figure 3 - SelSus Cloud and SelComp Interaction 

The whole logic is that every service running in the Sensor SelComp implements 

the  publish-subscribe  pattern  and  can  be  connected  in  a  directed  acyclic  graph 

arrangement fashion, as presented in Figure 3. Data flows from the bottom of the graph, 




 

WP3 SelSus 

D3.5 White Paper on Sensor Clouds 

Version 2.0 

FoF.NMP.2013-8

 

 



Page 10 of 18 

 

© SelSus Consortium 



through  data  processing  services  and  ends  up typically  in  the  SelSus  Cloud  or  in  other 

components in the network subscribing the Sensor SelComp services. This design puts a 

strong  emphasis  in  the  “servicitization”  of  processes  and  physical  devices.  This 

virtualization turns the shop-floor in a digital twin of the physical world, which makes this 

system to be aligned with the recent Industrial CPS and ISC trends. 

 

3.1



 

Dynamic Modular Software Reconfiguration 

 

The  Dynamic  Modular  Software  Reconfiguration  is  the  proposed  solution 



embedded  in  the  Sensor  SelComp  to  be  highly  reconfigurable  and  to  quickly  adapt  to 

industrial demands. Therefore, it must provide consistent mechanisms to configure, deploy 

and  dynamically  reconfigure  the  Sensor  SelComp  source  code  responsible  for  data 

processing,  which  traduces  in  a  component-based  middleware.  It  is  component-based 

because each piece of software that can be reconfigured at the Sensor SelComp level is 

seen as a component that can be easily updated or exchanged. 

In software engineering the terms “Modular Software” and “Software Component” 

are  the  most  approximate  topics  to  what  we  refer  as  “Reconfigurable  Software”. 



Component  reuse,  reduction  of  the  production  cost,  reconfiguration  in  runtime, 

short time to market and systematic approach to the system construction are some 

of the key benefits of using a component model. Component models can be divided in two 

categories: 1) as in object-oriented programming, components are objects; 2) components 

represent  units  in  software  architectures.  “A  generally  accepted  view  of  a  software 



component is that it is a software unit with provided services and required services. ... In 

current component models where components are objects in the sense of object-oriented 

programming, the methods of these objects are the provided services”. 

In the proposed solution two component model approaches are offered to provide an even 

better flexibility. At the system level there is the possibility to extend the Sensor SelComp 

building blocks with plugins. At data processing level, there is the possibility to add new 

data treatment and processing modules to the Sensor SelComp to use. There are two ways 

to develop data treatment modules: 1) develop code in Java using the defined interfaces; 

2) develop code in C#, Java or C++ and use the SelSus Cloud to convert the code in a 

JavaScript module file. In both ways, the SelSus Sensor Cloud uploads the modules to the 

Sensor SelComp, which maintains the modules in the local file system  

Figure 2. 

A SelComp internal logic arrangement is represented using a directed acyclic graph 

(DAG). The graph structure in Figure 4

 

can be divided in three levels, each with a different 



label and colour assignment: the Sensor Level includes sensor instances (bottom level), 

providing  data  to  the  gateway;  the  data  treatment  level  (middle  level),  includes  nodes 

representing instances of algorithms embedded at the gateway that can treat information 

in several ways (e.g. aggregate and validate data using techniques such as control charts, 

perform trend analysis, etc.); the Network Level (top level) includes nodes where the flow 

resulting from the lower level nodes can be redirected to subscribing hosts in the network 

(e.g.  Sensor  Cloud,  industrial  machines).  This  internal  structure  can  be  dynamically 

rearranged in runtime using the Sensor Cloud, where new sensors and data modules can 

be  loaded  and  therefore,  the  connections  between  nodes  can  be  reformulated  to 

synchronize and treat data in new ways. 




 

WP3 SelSus 

D3.5 White Paper on Sensor Clouds 

Version 2.0 

FoF.NMP.2013-8

 

 



Page 11 of 18 

 

© SelSus Consortium 



 

 

Figure 4 - Sensor SelComp configuration 

 

3.2

 

Flexible Sensor Integration 

 

The technology developed for flexible and easy Sensor Integration in the SelSus project is 



a cloud-based user interface solution that enables a person without or with little 

programming knowledge to specify a new Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) message 

parser. The typical architecture for a WSN is composed of sensor nodes and gateways

being the sensor nodes the generators of data, and it needs to reach the gateway where it 

is then handled by the Sensor SelComp. This means that the technology developed is 

operating on the South Gate of

 

 

Figure 2. 

The construction of this WSN message parser is not only suitable for new nodes to 

be integrated in the network, but also to extend existing ones to support new sensors in 

the node itself. In order to build the desired parser, there’s the major assumption that the 

message  frame  content  is  known.  Based  on  this,  we  started  to  define  that  a  certain 

message frame is composed by a set of items. The item is the atomic element that needs 

to be found in the messages received in the gateway. This way, an item can be defined as 

only one byte or set of bytes, depending on the user preferences, that can be in a pre-

defined  position  /  location  in  the  message,  called  index  (in  case  of  non-variable  size 

messages)  or  vary  according  to  the  encoding  of  the  message  (in  case  of  variable  size 

messages). Based on this, the Flexible Sensor Integration solution will look for these items 

on  new  messages  received,  by  a  specific  order  ruled  by  the  indexes  defined  in  the 

interface, and if all items match the message received, it can be correctly interpreted. 

Normally,  the  first  item  is  a  SYNC  which  is  a  sequence  of  chars  that  uniquely 

specifies  the  start  of  a  message.  This  kind  of  item  is  particularly  important  because  it 




 

WP3 SelSus 

D3.5 White Paper on Sensor Clouds 

Version 2.0 

FoF.NMP.2013-8

 

 



Page 12 of 18 

 

© SelSus Consortium 



defines when to start interpreting the message, and also is used to know  which type of 

message is, and choose the right parser for decoding. 

Therefore, for each item is specified by 1) Name; Type (how should be decoded); 

2) Default Value (if it has one, hex-encoded); 3) Start Index; Size (if it isn’t variable); 4) 

Variable Field (true or false depending if the size is or not fixed). 

If  an  item  is  variable  (not  fixed  size  for  interpretation),  the  immediate  next  item  in  most 

cases is a separating char.  

Additionally,  the  user  interface  is  also  used to  provide  additional  information  like 

manufacturer, model, serial port configuration (only for protocol that needs one), physical 

link, protocol name and protocol norm. For ease of sensor integration, the SelSus system 

already have component meta-information that can filled for further ease of integration in 

the system. 

After creating the parser in the Cloud solution, all the parsers are converted to a 

XML encoded representation with all data needed to receive and decode one message 

type. Moreover, at the Cloud level is possible to deploy the parsers to any chosen Sensor 

SelComp, becoming immediately available to interpret new data from the sensor nodes. 

The present solution for sensor integration was validated using IEEE802.15.4 RF Protocol, 

with 4 motes, 2 different baud rates (115200, 57600), 4 sensors (Battery, ACC, PIR and 

Temperature).  These  tests  were  performed  not  only  in  a  PC  platform,  but  also  in  a 

Raspberry Pi 2 to test the efficiency in lower computational powered devices. Two major 

tests were made: 1) 4 motes with one sensor each; 2) 4 motes, but 1 mote with 1 sensor, 

1 mote with 2 sensors, 1 mote with 3 sensors and finally 1 mote with 4 sensors each). 

Some preliminary results are depicted in Figure 5 and Figure 6 where the amount 

of  time  required  to  interpret  a  single  sensor  message  is  presented  in  milliseconds.  The 

tests were made using a Sampling Rate of 5 seconds (0.2Hz) for a period of 1h. From the 

figures,  we  can  also  see  that  the  performance  of  the  PC  is  better  comparing  with  the 

Raspberry  Pi  2,  as  expected.  Using  the  PC  platform  (Figure  5)  the  mean  value  of  all 

decoded  messages  is  0.056  milliseconds  and  standard  deviation  of  0.095  milliseconds. 

For the Raspberry Pi 2 test, the mean value is 1.27 milliseconds, with a standard deviation 

of 1.05 milliseconds. 

 

 

 




 

WP3 SelSus 

D3.5 White Paper on Sensor Clouds 

Version 2.0 

FoF.NMP.2013-8

 

 



Page 13 of 18 

 

© SelSus Consortium 



Figure 5 - 4 motes, one sensor per mote, 57600 Baudrate, 1h running, Pc Platform 

 

 



 

Figure 6 - 4 Motes, one sensor per mote, 57600 Baudrate, 1h Running, Raspberry Pi 2 

Platform 

 

3.3



 

Statistical Analysis 

 

One of the key aspects that is peremptory when assessing the data from sensors 



installed in a certain shop-floor equipment is the statistical processing. Therefore, one of 

the main goals in the SelSus project is to develop algorithms and modules for statistical 

sensor data processing. 

Besides  validation  of  sensor  readings  for  the  detection  of  sensor  malfunction, 

algorithms based on statistical analysis have been developed and implemented for data 

fusion,  multi-variable  processing,  process  monitoring  and  fault  detection  to  process  the 

huge amount of data generated by the sensor network. 

One of the main challenges in automated sensor signal processing is the sensor 

signal validation. Since sensor signals are subjected to drifts and noise, simple fixed limit 

strategies  reveal  not  to  be  so  effective.  A  much  more  sophisticated  way  is  a  validation 

based  on  Kalman  Filter  strategies.  Consider  a  sensor  delivers  temperature  data  (float 

precision  single  value)  at  certain  -  not  equidistant - time  instances.  An  alarm  should  be 

generated when an unusual temperature change occurs. This could be for example caused 

by  a  sudden  strong  friction  or  a  smouldering  fire.  Additionally,  due  to  day/night  and 

seasonal drifts it is not possible to apply fixed limits for an alarm activation. 

The aim of the algorithm is to detect if the measurement series behaves unusually, 

for example overheating or certain pressure loss while tolerating normal process patterns. 

Generally speaking, a system state must be observed from noisy measurements and the 

state movement must be evaluated against a usual drift. The concept of the KALMAN state 

observer is very suited for this approach because it allows not only the state observation 

but also the estimation of typical state variance which can be used to detect faulty state or 



 

WP3 SelSus 

D3.5 White Paper on Sensor Clouds 

Version 2.0 

FoF.NMP.2013-8

 

 



Page 14 of 18 

 

© SelSus Consortium 



measurement situations. For a proper filter usage, the knowledge of a typical process drift 

and  noise  characteristic  is  required.  Base  on  a  series  of  provided  sensor  reading,  the 

implemented algorithm is able to estimate these parameters in a reliable manner. 

The  second  implemented  statistical  approach  deals  with  the  analysis  of  sensor 

array behaviour. In this situation if there are multiple sensor readings in parallel it would be 

annoying to setup individual control charts for each individual sensor. Moreover, it would 

not  be  possible  to  detect  faults  which  are  due  to  unusual  correlations.  Also  the  natural 

redundancy of such a sensor array would not be exploitable. So there are many reasons 

to deal with multivariate methods for assessing sensors array data as a whole. Common 

methods dealing with this are the Q² and T² Statistics. 

While Q

2

 Statistics deals with outliers which are not covered with the multivariate 



model, T² Statistics considers reading which can be explained with the multivariate model, 

but  have  unusual  features.  Both  statistical  values  allow  the  detection  of  any  unusual 

environmental behaviour or sensor malfunctions of the data delivered from a sensor array. 

A  special  type  of  application  sensors  are  used  in  batch  processing  supervision. 

While a batch is processed multiple trace are recorded for different parameter or at multiple 

places. From a PCA based decomposition a set of characteristic base pattern is extracted 

from a set of historical recording. Applying these patterns to the traces delivered by the 

sensors yields to key numbers which characterize the process itself and helps to access 

and monitor the process quality. 

Ultimately,  the  algorithms  have  been  successfully  applied  to  the  HWH  and  IEF 

Werner demonstrators. In case of IEF Werner demonstrator, a linear axis which moved up 

and down was integrated in the system (a SelComp was created to wrap the equipment) 

and a Statistical Analysis was made from the acquired data. From Figure 7, the statistical 

numbers T

2

, Q


2

, maximum model error were calculated and compared against alternating 

limits (red dots) – always one for up and one for down movement. If any limit is exceeded, 

the run is considered as faulty (red circle) and it ran for 50 cycles. 

 

 

Figure 7 - Statistical evaluation of traces to detect faulty movements – IEF Werner 



Demonstrator 

 



 

WP3 SelSus 

D3.5 White Paper on Sensor Clouds 

Version 2.0 

FoF.NMP.2013-8

 

 



Page 15 of 18 

 

© SelSus Consortium 



In the Harms & Wende demonstrator, a welding machine was integrated and the voltage 

and current curves were obtained. From this curves, a PCA decomposition was made to 

obtain  the  most  significant  components,  and  by  using  the  singular  values  a  Statistical 

Analysis was made using again T

2

, Q


2

 and maximum model error. Figure 8 shows that this 

analysis is a really good way for monitoring derivations of shapes from process batches 

captured from the welding machine. For this demonstrator, 250 welds were made to test 

the solution. 

 

 



 

 

Figure 8 - Statistical evaluation of welding traces to detect unusual shapes – Harms & 

Wende Demonstrator 

 

 




 

WP3 SelSus 

D3.5 White Paper on Sensor Clouds 

Version 2.0 

FoF.NMP.2013-8

 

 



Page 16 of 18 

 

© SelSus Consortium 



4  Impact 

4.1

 

Sensor SelComps in Industry 

 

The  impact  of  the  most  advanced  and  robust  technological  developments  in 



software, hardware, data treatment and others can have a huge impact on how the shop-

floor is perceived, analysed, interpreted and operated. With the use of sensory solutions, 

the  factory  blueprint  can  be  obtained  by  simply  adding  new  equipment  to  measure  the 

main processes, and therefore its dynamics can be quantified. With this quantification, is 

possible to analyse the key points of optimization and improve the systems performance 

and  reliability.  For  that  purpose,  data  from  various  shop-floor  equipment  needs  to  be 

integrated  in  a  manufacturing  system,  such  as  MES  or  ERP  for  data  acquisition,  and 

collectively stored for further analysis. 

Based on this, we could notice the increasing publications and citation of scientific 

papers in conferences and journals relating sensory solutions, mainly Wireless Sensor 

Networks (WSN), with Cloud-based solutions. This is demonstrated by Figure 9 and  

 

Figure 10 that present the number of citations and published papers, both per year. 



The  Figures  show  a  clear  tendency  towards  the  exploration  of  Sensor  Cloud  concept, 

which aims to develop a platform for sensor integration, data storage and data analysis. 

The idea is to have a distributed system with a well-defined API to establish a standardized 

communication with heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks, allow the easy access to 

this data for integration with other external systems, and a set of graphical user tools to 

increase the easiness and flexibility when dealing with such kind of systems. 

It’s  based  on  this  kind  of  concept  and  all  the  major  industry  difficulties  that  the 

developments  of  SelSus  project  related  with  sensors  was  made.  This  means  that  the 

solutions  presented  such  as  Statistical  Analysis,  Dynamic  Modular  Software 

Reconfiguration and Flexible Sensor Integration have a direct impact in the manufacturing 

processes. These technologies and new concepts are the starting point towards a more 

connected factory, easier to perceive, easier to handle in case of sudden deviations, and 

ultimately easier to act when a decision needs to be made. 

Nowadays, the paradigm of sensing the factory dynamics can be rewritten towards 

smart industrial sensors. This means that using the concepts of on-the-fly reconfiguration 

using statistical analysis, sensors could provide more than raw information, more than a 

set of data acquired in a high frequency rate that need to be post-processed. They could 

provide metrics, machine states, process drifts and so forth, used for decision making and 

even directly feed a machine for online calibration an optimization. The benefits are not 

only  in  the  efficiency  of  machines,  but  also  how  efficiently  the  system  users  operate 

equipment. Based on the fact that these solutions do not imply a direct coding to perform 

the desired changes in the system, but instead a graph-like interface to design the workflow 

of  data  treatment,  opens  the  doors  for  many  people  to  work  in  such  industrial 

environments,  with  the  same  outcome  as  a  programmer,  but  with  less  effort.  This 

represents a new approach to what the usual systems in industry can provide in terms of 

flexibility and ease of use.  

Additionally, also the concept of Plug’n’Produce is complemented with the solutions 

proposed. One aspect already explored, is the device discovery and data exchange using 

the  publish-subscribe  pattern  that  is  nowadays  well-implemented  by  technologies  like 

UPnP,  OPC-UA,  DDS  and  others,  so  now  the  effort  is  focused  on  how  to  extract  the 

information from the shop-floor components for further broadcast. This issue is tackle by 




 

WP3 SelSus 

D3.5 White Paper on Sensor Clouds 

Version 2.0 

FoF.NMP.2013-8

 

 



Page 17 of 18 

 

© SelSus Consortium 



the Flexible Sensor Integration and it can avoid the technicians to code a parser in some 

programming language to design it graphically. With the use of the DMsR, the parsers can 

be deployed in run-time in the SelComps at the shop-floor level, without the need to turn it 

down, deploy the parser and turn in up again passing through all the process of device 

discovery. Once again, the participation of the user in the most important phases of building 

and maintaining a process line is the key element that drive the presented work. 

 

 

 



Figure 9 - Paper Citations in each Year 

 

 



 

 

Figure 10 - Published papers in Each Year 

 



 

WP3 SelSus 

D3.5 White Paper on Sensor Clouds 

Version 2.0 

FoF.NMP.2013-8

 

 



Page 18 of 18 

 

© SelSus Consortium 



5  Appendix A 

 

Set of keywords used for the search in Web of Science platform:  



 

  Sensor-cloud;  



  Sensor cloud computing;  

  Sensor cloud-based;  



  Sensor cloud industry;  

  Sensor cloud manufacturing;  



  Sensor Cloud Application;  

  Sensor Cloud Storage;  



  Sensor cloud industrial;  

  Sensor Cloud Infrastructure;  



  Sensor Cloud-Oriented;  

  Sensor Cloud Platform;  



  Sensor Cloud Servers;  



  Sensor Cloudware



 



Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə