Shnh 0911 cover qxd



Yüklə 0,51 Mb.

səhifə1/16
tarix14.12.2017
ölçüsü0,51 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   16


No. 109  December 2015

DIARY

Eton College

Natural History

Museum

Spring 2016

See Item 14

Newsletter



CORRESPONDENCE ADDRESS

c/o The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London, SW7 5BD, UK

www.shnh.org.uk     

Registered Charity No. 210355

CONTENTS

First and Foremost 

1

Society News & Announcements  4



Society Events News 

13

Forthcoming Society Events 



15

Other Events 

15

A Good Read



16

News & Information

17

Notes & Queries



18

Publishers’ Announcements

25

New & Recent Publications



29

New Members

32



Book launch of The Curious Mr Catesby at the Linnean Society of London

Photos by Elaine Shaughnessy and Malgosia Nowak-Kemp

Arthur MacGregor with Henrietta McBurney Ryan

& Sir David Attenborough.

Pat Morris talking about Charles Waterton’s

taxidermy.

Malgosia Nowak-Kemp with Pat & Mary Morris.

Charles Nelson with Sir Ghillean Prance &

David Elliott.

Charlie Jarvis, Florence Pieters & Diny Winthagen.

SHNH members meeting to go for a walk on the

Walton Hall grounds.



SHNH Meeting on Charles Waterton, Wakefield

Photos by Helen Cowie and John Parmenter




1. President’s Message

“Never  heard  of  him!”  Don't  worry  –

you haven't been asleep while I toiled

my  way  through  the  ranks  of  the

professional  naturalists:  if  I  mention

that most of my career was spent at the

Ashmolean  Museum  and  that  my  last

such appointment was as director of the

Society  of  Antiquaries,  you'll  get  the

picture. 

“Bit  of  an  amateur,  then?”  Pretty

much,  though  I've  strayed  into  the

natural  world  from  time  to  time

through  my  interests  in  archaeology,

early  modern  history,  and  latterly

through  the  history  of  collecting  (I've

edited  the  Journal  of  the  History  of

Collections for almost thirty years).

What  a  contrast,  then,  with  our

outgoing  president,  Hugh  Torrens,

whose work I have known and admired

since the early 1980s. A one-man centre

of  geological  excellence,  Hugh's  high

standing  in  the  world  of  historical

research in the field of natural history is

all the more remarkable since this was

not at all the focus of his department at

Keele.  A  champion  of  numberless

underrated 

contributors 

to 


the

evolution  of  natural  science,  Hugh's

interests extend also to John Woodward,

William Smith, Mary Anning and others

who have become household names due

to  his  work  and  that  of  other

researchers, not least in the pages of the

Geological  Curator,  in  which  he  was  a

major driving force, and summed up in

his book The Practice of British Geology,

1750–1850 (2002).  But  of  course  his

interests were much wider: I wondered

momentarily  if  he  could  really  be  the

writer  of  an  article  encountered  in  an

early  edition  of  Motor  Sport,  but  the

opening sentence left no room for doubt

–  “It  seems

impossible  to

remain neutral

about the front-

wheel-drive cars

Alvis 


made

between  1925

and  1932”.  I

don't  believe

Hugh  has  ever

been  able  to

remain neutral

on  any  subject

and the Society

has 


gained 

hugely 


from 

the


campaigning  zeal  he  brought  to  the

presidency.

The  very  diversity  offered  by  the

history  of  natural  history  (like  the

broader history of collecting) gives it an

immediate and wide appeal. Archives of



Natural  History can  always  be  relied

upon for a rewarding read, particularly

from the way that specialists in one field

are exposed to – and are obliged to write

for  –  those  whose  primary  interests

may  lie  elsewhere.  I  like  the  way  too

that any one issue is likely to range in

subject-matter 

from 

exploration



and  collecting  in  the  field,  through

the 


difficulties 

of 


interpretation,

conservation,  publication,  exhibition

and reception. Ultimately it’s the impact

our subject makes on the wider world

that determines its success, rather than

its appeal to a narrow interest group. It's

my hope that the membership, having

benefited  from  three  years  of  Hugh

Torrens's  expert  leadership,  will  find

room  to  accommodate  for  a  while  a

more  generalized  occupant  of  the

presidential  chair,  though  one  no  less

committed  to  the  wellbeing  of  the

Society. 

Arthur MacGregor

SHNH President



First and Foremost

Arthur MacGregor.

Photo David Gowers.

1



2. From the Editor

Season’s  greetings  and  warmest  wishes

for  the  new  year.  We  have  had  some

wonderful  meetings  and  it  has  been

lovely to meet up with so many of you

during the year. A warm welcome to our

new members.

In  May,  our  patron Sir  David

Attenborough was among the guests at

the  Linnean  Society  of  London  book

signing event of The curious Mr Catesby

(E. Charles Nelson & David Elliott (eds),

2015). It was an excellent evening with

fascinating  talks  by  David  Elliott  and

Charles  Nelson.  Many  SHNH  members

who  contributed  to  the  volume  were

able  to  attend  and  there  was  much

catching up on news at the reception in

the Library.

The  curious  Mr  Catesby has  been

receiving some excellent reviews includ-

ing  by  Charlotte  Tancin  in  Huntia  (15

(2): 233 -234). Charlotte ends her com-

prehensive  review  by  noting  that  “The

Curious  Mister  Catesby  is  an  important

contribution  to  the  history  of  natural

history, and its editors and contributors

are  to  be  congratulated.  The  book  is

affordably  priced  and  would  be  a  good

addition  to  public  and  academic

libraries, as well as a treat for individu-

als with an interest in history and natu-

ral history”. The documentary film ‘The

curious  Mister  Catesby’  can  now  be

viewed  online  at  https://www.cates-

bytrust.org/resources.  It  had  its  pre-

miere  at  the  Royal  Society  some  years

ago, followed by a successful run on US

public  broadcasting.  The  short  broad-

cast  opening  can  also  be  seen  at  the

above location. 

We also had a really enjoyable meet-

ing  this  summer  in  Wakefield  on

Charles  Waterton,  which  Helen  Cowie

and  Gina  Douglas  report  on.  The

Society’s  AGM  was  also  held  and  the

Society  welcomed  our  new  President

and  Members  of  Council,  and  thanked

our outgoing Councillors for their con-

tribution to the Society.

We  are  sad  to  have  lost  our  good

friend  and  colleague  Juliet  Clutton-

Brock. Our thoughts are with her family

at this time. Arthur MacGregor has writ-

ten  a  lovely  piece  on  Juliet  for  the

newsletter.

I  should  like  to  thank  everyone  for

their contributions. There are a number

of Notes & Queries so do look and see if

you  can  help  on  any  of  the  enquiries.

Our  events  are  regularly  posted  on  the

website,  so  do  check  so  you  can  be

aware of future activities.

Elaine


Elaine Shaughnessy

3. Message from Hugh Torrens

Past President

Some departing ramblings

I  must  start  with  an

apology  for  what  life

has  thrown  at  us.

Very soon after I had

agreed to take on the

role  of  president,  my

wife was hit by a taxi,

whilst  she  was  a

pedestrian on 12 March 2012. Both our

lives were changed.

This has meant a less successful pres-

idency  than  I  had  hoped.  But  our

Society  is  in  good  hands,  with  another

fine  issue  of  Archives  of  Natural  History

just  out.  I  should  like  first  to  thank  all

our  officers  for  the  kind,  effective  and

efficient services they provide for us all,

and  I  also  thank,  and  welcome,  Arthur

MacGregor,  late  of  the  Ashmolean

Museum, who now takes over from me.

But  I  have  had  many  concerns

regarding  our  museums  and  libraries,

during this current long “period of aus-

2





Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   16


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə