Sir derek (harold richard) barton bsc, PhD, dsc(Lond), frs



Yüklə 27,99 Kb.

tarix28.07.2018
ölçüsü27,99 Kb.


Sir DEREK (HAROLD RICHARD) BARTON 

BSc, PhD, DSc(Lond), FRS 

Sir Derek Barton’s sudden death in his 80

th

 year, on 16 March 1998, ended the still-active career of the most distinguished 



British organic chemist of his generation.  An account that did even scant justice to his achievements would require the 

space of a biography.  Here it must suffice to illustrate briefly his multifarious contributions to organic chemistry and to 

commemorate the lasting influence of a remarkable man on the great body of former students and colleagues. 

Derek Barton, or DHRB as he was often known, was born on 8 September 1918 and educated at Tonbridge School.  He 

graduated in 1940 after 2 years at Imperial College and obtained his PhD just 2 years later; the award of the DSc followed 

in 1949.  As was usual during the war years, his postgraduate research was on a topic of national interest, namely the 

synthesis of vinyl chloride by the gas-phase pyrolysis of 1, 2- and 1, 1-dichloroethane.  At the end of the war he spent a 

year with Albright and Wilson Ltd then returned to Imperial College as an Assistant Lecturer to teach practical inorganic 

chemistry to mechanical engineers.  An ICI Fellowship (1946-49) enabled him to develop the interest in the structure and 

synthesis of terpenes and steroids that was to flower during a sabbatical year (1949-50) at Harvard.  He was invited there 

by Louis Fieser with whose encouragement he submitted the seminal paper on ‘conformational analysis’, as it became 

known,  that  appeared  in  Experientia  in  1950  and  led  to  his  share,  with  Odd  Hassel,  of  the  1969  Nobel  Prize  for 

Chemistry. 

Before  1950  there was little interest taken in the precise shapes or ‘conformations’ adopted by flexible molecules, but 

within  the  following  decade  conformational  analysis  became  a  central  concept  in  wide  areas  of  chemistry  and 

biochemistry.  Hassel had earlier deduced the preferred conformations of cis- and trans-decalin, but these flexible forms 

were  regarded as having only superficial significance in comparison with the classical, fixed stereochemical features of 

molecules.    Barton  showed  that  conformational  analysis  could  be  used  to  predict  chemical  reactivity  and  to  decide 

between alternative reaction pathways.  He often referred to the Experientia publication as “my lucky paper”, insisting 

that others could have drawn the same conclusions had they read the literature.  He advised his co-workers to devote as 

much time as possible to critical reading, maintaining that creative ideas cannot develop in a vacuum but need the stimulus 

of observations gleaned from published research, sometimes in unfamiliar fields, or from lectures and seminars. 

After leave in Harvard, Barton became successively Reader then Professor at Birkbeck College, London (1950-55).  He 

was not always tactful in dealings with influential British chemists, but even those with ruffled feathers soon acknowledged 

his status as a candidate for a senior Chair.  The Regius Chair in Glasgow became vacant with the appointment of J W 

Cook as Vice-Chancellor of Exeter University, and Barton accordingly moved north in 1955, just after the Oxford Chair 

had been taken by E R H Jones.  There had been no immediate prospect of a post at Cambridge or Imperial College.  

However, R P Linstead unexpectedly became Rector of Imperial College and his Chair was then occupied by the internal 

appointment of E A Braude, only to be vacated again by the latter’s tragic suicide.  Thus, after just 2 years in Glasgow, 

Barton returned to London to revitalise organic chemistry at Imperial College. 

Barton’s brief stay in Glasgow was productive and for the only time in Britain his every request for resources was met 

immediately and in full.  He began a fruitful collaboration with J Monteath Robertson on the X-ray structure determination 

of  complex  natural  products  and  developed  important  lines  of  research,  including  organic  photochemistry  and  the 

oxidative  coupling  of  phenols,  that  were  continued  at  Imperial  College.    The latter research arose from a mechanistic 

reinterpretation  of  an  old  experiment and the consequent revision of the structure of Pummerer’s ketone, an oxidation 

product of p-cresol.  The original structure had been generally accepted and indeed was used by Sir Robert Robinson as 

a  model  for  the  biosynthesis  of  morphine.    Its  revision  had  immediate  synthetic  and  biosynthetic  implications  for 

morphine  and  a  wide  range  of  other  phenolic  alkaloids.    With T Cohen, Barton published a new biosynthetic theory, 

based  upon  the  oxidative  coupling  of  phenols,  which  was  soon  to  be  verified  at  Imperial  College  by  an  extended 

programme of radiotracer experiments in higher plants. 

The period (1957-78) at Imperial College saw the diversification of Barton’s research and the emergence of his life-long 

interest in the invention of new synthetic reactions, often in response to a challenging problem in the chemical industry.  A 

striking example was the invention of the Barton Reaction for the directed functionalisation of specific sites in molecules 

by the photolysis of nitrite esters, which was first tested at the RIMAC Institute, founded by the Schering Corporation in 

Cambridge (Mass.).  This new technique was initially devised to provide a short, practical synthesis of the rare, steroidal 

hormone  aldosterone,  although  its  wide  applications  were  soon  exploited.    It  was  said  that  more  time  was  spent 

retrospectively searching the literature than effecting the synthesis, since Barton could not believe that such a simple idea 

had  been  previously  overlooked!    Similarly,  the  elegant  design  of  the  Barton  and  McCombie  reaction  for  radical 

deoxygenation, and its later developments, arose from the industrial need to remove hydroxy groups from sugars. 

In 1977 Barton made the bold decision to retire early from Imperial College and begin a new career in France.  He became 

director of the ICSN, a government-financed research institute at Gif-sur-Yvette.  His second wife Christiane was French 



and  he  understood  the  language  perfectly  and  spoke  it  fluently  with  what  he  described  as  “an  English  accent  that  is 

supposed to be charming”.  Moreover, his new retirement age was 70, although the incoming French government soon 

curtailed it.  At Gif (1978-87) he worked harder than ever and accomplished as much as in the productive decade from 

1950 to 1960.  In particular, he embarked on a major research programme, with the support of British Petroleum’s ‘blue 

sky’ fund, which continued for his remaining years.  He developed a series of ‘Gif reagents’, with iron as a key catalytic 

component, aimed to mimic non-enzymically Nature’s ubiquitous oxygenation at saturated, unreactive carbon.  The long-

term  aims  were  to  gain  insight  into  biochemical  oxygenation  and  to  develop  reagents  applicable  generally  in  organic 

synthesis. 

As retirement from Gif approached, Barton gladly accepted the offer of a third career, as a Distinguished Professor at 

Texas  A&M  University,  where  he  stayed  from  1986  until  his  untimely  death.    His  enthusiasm  for  research  remained 

unabated,  as  did  his  immense  capacity  for  work  and  the  resulting  flow  of  research  papers.    The  1995  award  by the 

American Chemical Society of their Priestley Medal coincided with his ‘in house’ appointment as the Dow Distinguished 

Professor  of  Chemical  Invention,  providing  further  indications  that  retirement  was  unthinkable  for  DHRB.    Learned 

societies, universities and governments paid worldwide tribute to his scientific achievements; existing records list over 60 

medals,  honorary  professorships,  lectureships  and  doctorates  as  well  as  his  knighthood  (1972).    Here  it  is  more 

appropriate to end with some comments on the man himself. 

Derek  Barton  early  acquired  the  reputation  of  being  hard  and  uncompromising,  a  reputation  that  grew  as much from 

anecdotes  as  first-hand  knowledge.    True,  he  could  deal  harshly  with fools and the lazy, but anyone demonstrating a 

serious  attitude to work and chemistry soon gained his respect.  To these, especially the young and inexperienced, he 

showed a patient willingness to help and guide.  At question time after colloquia the sight of Barton in the audience could 

unsettle even confident speakers.  His ability to detect flaws in an argument and to reveal publicly gaps in a speaker’s 

knowledge  of  chemistry  was  legendary,  and  woe  betide  the  pretentious or those who tried evasion as a form of self-

defence!  His academic staff learned to be alert before, as well as during and after, colloquia.  Occasionally, with advance 

warning of seconds rather than minutes, he would invite a young colleague to introduce the speaker, with an encouraging 

remark such as “Of course you know all about Dr X’s published work”. 

On first acquaintance, Barton might appear austere and reserved, an impression reinforced by his unconscious use of the 

regal  ‘we’  in  discussions,  but new co-workers soon discovered a sense of humour and inherent kindness beneath the 

formidable exterior.  He could be abrupt with those who failed to perform to the best of their ability, but an intelligent 

suggestion or a hard-earned result was rewarded with generous praise and encouragement.  Naturally, he mellowed with 

time and came to enjoy relaxations other than reading the journals, even if he still maintained that “all a young man needs is 

a bench and a good library”.  He could then be excellent company on convivial evenings with a fund of anecdotes and 

reminiscences to entertain his friends. 

Science has lost a great chemist, but Sir Derek Barton’s true memorial is the lasting respect and affection of his students 

and colleagues; their loss and especially that of his third wife Judith is deeply felt. 



GORDON W KIRBY 

 



Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə