Sir walter scott (1771-1832)



Yüklə 0,51 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə13/26
tarix05.04.2022
ölçüsü0,51 Mb.
#85078
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   ...   26
119-2014-03-05-2. Walter Scott

Answer 5 

The  seventy-second,  and  last chapter of  Waverley  starts  with  the  lines  "Our  journey  is 

now finished (...)".  

We have been reading about Waverley’s journey into Scotland. This journey is not only a 

process of travelling from one place to another, but also the account of an experience of changing 

and developing of an individual within the framework of his time and society.  

Later  on,  in  the  same  chapter,  Scott  claims  that:  "There  is  no  European  nation  which, 

within the course of half a century, or little more, has undergone so complete a change as this 

kingdom of Scotland." It is then quite clear that we have read about a change: a social activity 

that creates history. People are moved by ‘their requirements and interests’ which is a ‘universal 

law of deveplopment’. (Berbeshkina, 1987: 218)

19

.  


Some of these changes are referred to, by Scott, with the following words: ‘gradual influx 

of  wealth’,  ‘extension  of  commerce’,  ‘the  change’,  ‘steadily  and  rapidly  progressive’,  ‘gradual’, 

‘progress’. Words that tell us not only about history, but about history in progress. Moreover, the 

novel itself is centred on one of those historical events that without doubt imply change, a civil 

                                                

19

 



Berbeshkina, Z., Yakovleva, L., Zerkin D. What is Historical Materialism?. Moscow: Progress  

Publishers, 1987.  

 



 

18 


war:  (...)  one  of  the  continual  historical  markers  in  this  novel  is  the  English  Civil  War. 

(Monnickendam, 1998: 37)

20



The movements and decisions of Waverley are based upon his ideas and desires but in 



some way directed by the movements of popular masses. Waverley is a passive hero, as most 

Scott’s heroes are (see the discussion of characterization and Monnickendam, 1998: 37). 

Waverley’s actions are, then, somehow directed by his historical moment. (Berbeshkina, 

1987:  220-1,  224-5).  It  happens  in  this  novel  that  the  hero  and  his  social  context  are  bound 

together  from  beginning  to  end.    Lukács  refers  to  the  fact  that  Waverley’s  actions  are  placed 

within  the  ‘development  admidst  the  most  terrible  crises’,  and  the  ‘daily  life  of  a  nation’.  We 

cannot separate Waverley’s movements and decisions from his historical context, which is itself 

movement.  The  continuity  is  always  at  the  same  time  a  growth,  a  further  development.  The 

"middle-of-the-road  heroes"  of  Scott  also  represent  this  side  of  popular  life  and  historical 

develpment (...). (Lukács, 1998: 293)

21

.  


Although Waverley plays a major role in the novel, he is not a maker of history. Lukács 

explains how the creation of the plot of the novel is based upon Waverley’s fortunes. That is to 

say, he is forced to live, to develop as a character, within the ongoing process of history of his 

country. He is an English country squire. In Scotland he joins the rebellious Stuart supporters but 

only as a result of personal friendship and love entanglements (Lukács, 1998: 292-3). Waverley’s 

importance  as  an  individual  is  emphasised  as  he  "travels"  in  a  period  of  crisis,  when  a  social 

system is breaking, and a new one is appearing. (Berbeshkina, 1987: 229). Waverley is a human 

hero. He lives inside history while history forms him as a hero.   

 


Yüklə 0,51 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   ...   26




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə