Sir walter scott (1771-1832)



Yüklə 0,51 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə3/26
tarix05.04.2022
ölçüsü0,51 Mb.
#85078
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   26
119-2014-03-05-2. Walter Scott

Waverley

1

 

 

Context 

 

In 1829, Scott wrote the General Preface to the Waverley Novels as part of the Magnum 



Opus,  the  definitive  version  of  the  Waverley  Novels.  In  it,  he  describes  the  composition  and 

dating of Waverley itself.  

  

It was with some idea of this kind that, about the year 1805, I threw together about one-



third of the first volume of Waverley. It was advertised to be published by the late Mr John 

Ballantyne,  bookseller  in  Edinburgh,  under  the  name  of  'Waverley,  or  'Tis  Fifty  Years 

Since,'  a  title  afterwards  altered  to  '  'Tis  Sixty  Years  Since,'  that  the  actual  date  of 

publication  might  be  made  to  correspond  with  the  period  in  which  the  scene  was  laid. 

Having proceeded as far, I think, as the Seventh Chapter, I showed my work to a critical 

friend,  whose  opinion  was  unfavourable..I  therefore  threw  aside  the  work  I  had 

commenced...this  portion  of  the  manuscript  was  laid  aside  in  the  drawers  of  an  old 

writing-desk...  I  happened  to  want  some  fishing-tackle  for  the  use  of  a  guest,  when  it 

occurred tome to search the old writing-desk already mentioned...I got access to it with 

some difficulty, and in looking for lines and flies the long lost manuscript presented itself. I 

immediately set to work to complete it according to my original purpose. And here I must 

frankly  confess  that  the  mode  in  which  I  conducted  the  story  scarcely  deserved  the 

success which the romance afterward attained. (Penguin Classics, 1994:7) 

 

The rest of the novel was apparently finished off in great haste in various stages between 



October 1813 and June 1814. It was published on July 7. 

This well-known story is, in the words of John Sutherland

2

, 'one of the hoarier creation 



myths of nineteenth-century literature...[but one] [t]he reading public have always loved.'(169) It is 

a well written story, with the convincing details of the fishing-tackle and the heaps of junk which 

cover the manuscript. It was immortalised on canvas by C. Hardie for A & C Black's 'Standard 

Edition'. It is also another example of the narrative device whereby someone comes across a lost 

manuscript: a device used by MacKenzie or Hawthorne, for example. It is not just readers who 

have swallowed this story hook, line and sinker, but also many critics and biographers.  

Evidence  would  indicate  that  if  not  false,  there  are  certain  inconsistencies  in  the  1829 

account.  The  most  searching  investigation  has  been  undertaken  by  Peter  Garside

3

,  whose 



conclusions  we  could  divide  basically  into  two  groups:  physical  evidence,  and  interpretative 

evidence,  that  is  to  say what  hard  facts  there  are,  and  what  they  imply.  Of  the  hard  facts,  the 

most  notable  is  that  the  paper  on  which  chapters  5-7  are  written  (1-4  have  been  lost)  is 

watermarked 1805 but it has come to light that significant portions of the manuscript of The Lady 



of the Lake are on paper marked 1805, with similar physical characteristics to that in use in the 

                                                

1

  This  section  draws  extensively  from  http://www.seneca.uab.es/scott/



1

  by  Andrew 

Monnickendam: A hypertextual Approach to Walter Scott’s Waverley. Bellaterra: U.A.B. Servei de 

Publicacions, 1998.  

2

 Sutherland, John. The Life of Sir Walter Scott: A Critical Biography. Oxford: Blackwell, 1995 



3

  Garside,  Peter.  "Popular  Fiction  and  National  Tale:  Hidden  Origins  of  Scott's  Waverley. 

Nineteenth-Century Literature. Volume 46, June 1991. 30-53 

Garside Peter. 'Dating Waverley's Early Chapters.' The Bibliotheck. Volume 13: 1986 : Number 

13. 61-81 

 

 




 

earliest surviving part of Waverley and the Ashtiel "Memoirs" where it resumes (Garside 35). This 



would seem to link temporally an area of the novel that has always been taken as forming part of 

Scott's initial phase of composition with two works firmly grounded in 1810. 

This proposition can only be countered by arguing that either only the first four chapters 

were written in 1805, or that Scott used the 1805 paper in 1805, then kept it for another five years 

before  taking  that  particular  lot  of  paper  out  for  use  again.  Both  this  hypotheses  are  highly 

suspect, if not ludicrous in the second case. 

There also claims that Ballantyne informed the publisher John Murray that there was 'a 

Scotch novel on the stocks' which was to appear anonymously in 1810. This would presumably 

have been Waverley and would belie the 1805 & 1813/4 story of its composition. Scott's reasons 

for writing this particular kind of novel at that particular time would be heavily oriented towards 

commerce as the larger literary stage, too, was now better set for an entry as a novelist. Maria 

Edgeworth's  Tales  of  Fashionable  Life  (1809)  had  consolidated  a  nationwide  craze  for 

idiosyncratic  regional  'manners'  (Garside  75).  Scott,  in  the  'General  Preface'  to  the  Waverley 

Novels (1829), describes why he decided to write Waverley after an interlude of several years: 

 

Two circumstances in particular recalled my recollection of the mislaid manuscript. The 



first was the extended and well-merited fame of Miss Edgeworth, whose Irish characters 

have gone so far to make the English familiar with the character of their gay and kind-

hearted  neighbours  of  Ireland,  that  she  may  be  truly  said  to  have  done  more  toward 

completing  the Union  than  perhaps  all  the  legislative enactments  by which  it  has  been 

followed up. 

 

This  is  unmistakably  a  political  statement  suggesting  that  union  can  only  come  about 



after  greater  knowledge  and  tolerance  of  other  people  is  achieved.  It  is  logical  to  assume  that 

Scott's intention in writing Waverley had the same promulgating aim: to paint a human rather than 

a savage Highlander. Maria Edgeworth praises characterisation in her letter of 1814. Her Castle 


Yüklə 0,51 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   26




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə