Sir walter scott (1771-1832)



Yüklə 0,51 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə4/26
tarix05.04.2022
ölçüsü0,51 Mb.
#85078
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   26
119-2014-03-05-2. Walter Scott

Rackrent (1800) had had a similar role in portraying  sympathic Irish characters.  

Such  evidence  compels  us  to  re-read  the  General  Preface  and  ask  ourselves  exactly 

what  went  on.  Peter  Garside  argues  that  focussing  on  two  single  dates  helps  reinforce  critical 

impressions of a double-backed novel: awkwardly innovatory in its early chapters (usually the first 

seven  are  so  isolated,  sometimes  five)  the  remainder  the  confident  product  of  Scott's  maturity 

(Garside 64).  

Since  the  first  six  chapters  are  set  entirely  in  England,  this  view  also  associates  the 

novel's Scottishness almost exclusively with the later phase. At the same time, the earlier date 

claws  backwards  to  ensure  Scott's  virtually  unrivalled precedence  as  the  originator of  'national' 

historical fiction. The retroactive story therefore helps to further the status of Scott the novelist as 

the leading literary figure of his time.  

 

Setting 

 

Waverley, as a historical novel, contains no extensive description of a military campaign. 

Scott  describes  Prestonpans,  briefly  mentions  Falkirk  and  has  virtually  nothing  to  say  about 

Culloden. Claire Lamont tries to discover why. She points out that: 

 

The famous dates of the summer of 1745 are not mentioned: Prince Charles raised his 



standard  at  Glenfinnan  on  19  August  and  entered  Edinburgh  on  17  September.  The 

dating in the novels is perhaps too reticent for those who do not know the succession of 

events in the '45; slight hints are enough for those who do. The battle of Prestonpans is 

described  in  detail  at  the  end  of  Volume  II,  and  the  historicity  of  it  is  stressed  by  the 




 

mention of the first of a series of dates marking the Jacobite campaign of the autumn of 



1745. (Lamont 22) 

On  the  one  hand,  Scott  is  sometimes  deliberately  vague,  while  on  the  other  hand, 

historicity  is  one  of  his  prime  concerns.  What  can  possibly  explain  this  ambiguous  narrative 

strategy? 

Claire  Lamont  proposes  that  Scott  might  have  felt  that,  given  the  repressive  political 

atmosphere of 1814 in the climactic years of the Napoleonic years, to deal with such treasonable 

material  was  a  risky  business.  To  this  suggestion,  we  could  add  that  such  a  supposition  goes 

some way towards explaining why a successful poet preferred to publish his politically sensitive 

novel anonymously. However, whether it is silence or reticence, it is striking to note that Scott's 

mention of Culloden, the historical conclusion to the events he narrates, is as brief as possible 

and that he concludes his novel with only the briefest mention of a series of events that present 

the  perfect  pretext  for  romance,  if  romance  were  Scott's  main  interest:  Charles  Stuart's  heroic 

adventures with Flora MacDonald and his escape to France. 

Claire Lamont argues that 'Culloden is Scott's watershed.' Silence does not necessarily 

mean  that  Culloden  is  insignificant,  quite  the  opposite:  she  insists  that  'the  "absent"  battle  of 

Culloden  is  the  fact  that  is  most  centrally  present  in  Waverley.'  Its  presence  haunts  the  whole 

novel as a 'modern myth'.

4

 



Robert  Crawfort  argues  that  Scott’s  affirmation  that  Scotland  would  become  England’s 

partner in the imperial enterprise would be an illustration of not Scottlish but British nationalism.

5

 

 




Yüklə 0,51 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   26




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə