SocLap sap – working draft


National policies, legislation and ongoing activities



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3.2. National policies, legislation and ongoing activities

Beside international agreements, the Eurasian Curlew is included in several national Red Lists and subject to national conservation legislation, as listed below:



Austria: Nature conservation legislation is governed by 9 different local government departments. Implementation of regulations, action plans and conservation measures vary between the regions. Existing conservation measures include habitat management through agri-environment schemes and the designation of SPAs for breeding Eurasian Curlew.

Belarus: No information was received during the formation of this ISSAP.

Belgium: No information was received during the formation of this ISSAP.

Bulgaria: No information was received during the formation of this ISSAP.

Denmark: Fully protected at all times and not a quarry species. Existing conservation measures include habitat management through agri-environment schemes, site protection and disturbance-free zones for non-breeding birds on game reserves.

Estonia: Not a quarry species. Category 3 species under national conservation legislation meaning at least 10% of known breeding sites should be protected. Existing conservation measures include habitat management on nature reserves. National action plan produced in 2013.

Finland: Fully protected at all times and not a quarry species. Existing conservation measures include habitat management through agri-environment schemes, designation of SPAs for breeding and staging birds, protection of coastal meadows, and habitat management through agri-environment schemes.

France: Curlew is a game species. Curlew can be legally hunted at certain sites and habitats along the coastline of the Atlantic, the English Channel and the North Sea. Certain coastal habitats are excluded. A moratorium is currently in place prohibiting the taking of Curlew at terrestrial sites. The open season runs from the first Saturday in August until the end of January. Existing conservation and management measures include hunting-free reserves, habitat management through agri-environment schemes, and habitat management and legal predator undertaken by hunters. A national management plan was produced in 2013 (Fouquet 2013).

Germany: Fully protected at all times and not a quarry species. Existing conservation measures include habitat management through agri-environment schemes, nest and brood protection measures, site protection and site restoration.

Greece: No information was received during the formation of this ISSAP.

Guinea: No information was received during the formation of this ISSAP.

Guinea-Bissau: No information was received during the formation of this ISSAP.

Hungary: No information was received during the formation of this ISSAP.

Iran: No information was received during the formation of this ISSAP.

Iraq: No species-specific protection. No national assessment of the species. Curlew benefit from wetland conservation efforts for species assemblages e.g. the marshlands in southern Iraq. Most hunting occurs in south, where average annual hunting bag is approximately 200-300 (Mudhafar Salim, pers. comm.)

Italy: No information was received during the formation of this ISSAP.

Ireland: Fully protected at all times and from October 2012 no longer a quarry species under the Wildlife (Wild Birds) (Open Seasons) (Amendment) Order 2012. Existing conservation measures include a coordinated monitoring scheme of wintering birds as part of I-WeBS, monitoring of breeding population on the Shannon Callows, peat cutting restrictions on 11 SACs and habitat management and predator control on Shannon Callows through NPWS Breeding Wader Grant Scheme. Curlew is included as a priority species in the national Upland Bird Conservation Action Plan.

Kazakhstan: No information was received during the formation of this ISSAP.

Kuwait: Fully protected under Kuwaiti environmental law, although illegal killing occurs.

Latvia: No information was received during the formation of this ISSAP.

Lithuania: No information was received during the formation of this ISSAP.

Mauritania: No information was received during the formation of this ISSAP.

Morocco: No information was received during the formation of this ISSAP.

Netherlands: Conservation measures include agri-environment schemes and trial studies using electric fencing to protect nests from predators.

Norway: Fully protected at all times and not a quarry species. Currently listed as Near Threatened, but due to be upgraded to Vulnerable on the Norwegian Red List (unpubl. 2015). No specific conservation measures for Curlew are currently in place, though may benefit from measures through National Action Plans for Corncrake Crex crex and Black-tailed Godwits Limosa limosa. Standardised annual spring and autumn migration counts have occurred at Birdlife/ Norway Lista Bird Observatory and Jomfruland Bird Observatory from 1980 onwards. Surveyed through Birdlife/ Norway NOFs Breeding Bird Survey from 1995 onwards - now part of program for terrestrial monitoring in Norway (TOV). Regional monitoring of breeding Curlew, Lapwing Vanellus vanellus and Oystercatcher Haematopus ostralegus in has occurred from 1997 onwards in Jæren, Rogaland County.

Oman: Fully protected. Waterbird surveys of Barr al Hikman are planned for every 3-years.

Poland: Fully protected at all times and not a quarry species. Existing conservation measures include nest and brood protection measures, head starting (the taking and incubating of eggs in captivity followed by the release of the chicks) and predator control. A national action plan is currently being developed.

Portugal: Classified as Least Concern. Not a quarry species. Majority of important wintering sites are protected.

Romania: No information was received during the formation of this ISSAP.

Russia: arquata is listed in the regional Red Data books for most administrative regions of European Russia (e.g. Oblasts, Krays, Autonomous Republics). Curlew is a game species in several regions. The open season runs from the third Saturday of August till the end December. No bag limits exist because Eurasian Curlew is not a popular quarry species. No hunting bag data exists to provide an estimate on total number of birds shot or trends.

Saudi Arabia: No information was received during the formation of this ISSAP.

Senegal: No information was received during the formation of this ISSAP.

Slovenia: No information was received during the formation of this ISSAP.

Sweden: Fully protected at all times and not a quarry species. Listed as vulnerable on the Swedish Red List. Existing conservation measures include private nest and brood protection measures at a small number of sites as well as generic agri-environment options (no curlew-specific options are available).

Tunisia: Legally protected since 2000 through Article 7 of the national hunting decree. Control of hunting activities is in place. No specific conservation measures for Curlew are currently in place. Included in the national list of rare and threatened species.

Turkey: Fully protected at all times and not a quarry species. Listed as Least Concern in the national Red List. An annual mid-winter waterbird census at ~ 100 wetlands based on look-see counts has been running since 1967. 24 curlews ringed in Samsun, Kızılırmak delta, 2010 as part of research into avian influenza. The birds were ringed, aged and released after cloacal and oropharyngeal sampling. No recoveries reported yet.

Ukraine: No information was received during the formation of this ISSAP.

United Arab Emirates: No information was received during the formation of this ISSAP.

United Kingdom: Fully protected at all times and not a quarry species under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 the Wildlife and Natural Environment Act (Northern Ireland) 2011. Species is amber-listed in the national list (Birds of Conservation Concern 3). Existing conservation measures include habitat management through agri-environment schemes and the designation of SPAs for breeding and non-breeding Curlew.

Uzbekistan: Game species. Annual bag limits are set and hunting typically occurs between mid-September to mid-November.

Yemen: Protected in 1995 under Article 12 of the Environmental Protection Law No. 26. In Yemen the Curlew is a passage migrant and winter visitor recorded from late June to late April. Based on limited data, a best guess estimate places the mid-winter population of <1,000 individuals, with a smaller number on passage (more in autumn than spring). Most birds occur on the intertidal flats along the Red Sea coast, many fewer on the Arabian Sea coast. No gatherings exceed 100 birds, but c5 sites regularly hold >50. Socotra has a wintering/migrant population of <100 birds.
Table 6: Membership of Range States in Multilateral Environmental Agreements.


Principal range state for Eurasian Curlew

Member State bound by EU Directives and policies

Beneficiary of EU European Neighbourhood Policy

Party to AEWA

Party to CMS

Party to Bern

Party to CBD

Party to Ramsar

Austria

Yes




No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Belarus

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Belgium

Yes




Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Bulgaria

Yes




Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Denmark

Yes




Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Estonia

Yes




Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Finland

Yes




Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

France

Yes




Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Germany

Yes




Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Greece

Yes




Applying

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Guinea

No




Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Guinea-Bissau

No




Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Hungary

Yes




Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Iran

No




No

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Iraq

No




No

No

No

Yes

Yes

Ireland

Yes




Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Italy

Yes




Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Kazakhstan

No




No

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Kuwait

No




No

No

No

Yes

Yes

Latvia

Yes




Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Lithuania

Yes




Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Mauritania

No




No

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Morocco

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Netherlands

Yes




Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Norway

No




Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Oman

No




No

No

No

Yes

Yes

Poland

Yes




No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Portugal

Yes




Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Romania

Yes




Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Russia

No

Yes

No

No

No

Yes

Yes

Saudi Arabia

No




No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Senegal

No




Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Slovenia

Yes




Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Sweden

Yes




Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Tunisia

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Turkey

No




No

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

U.A.E

No




No

No

No

Yes

Yes

U.K

Yes




Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Ukraine

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Uzbekistan

No




Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Yemen

No




No

Yes

No

Yes

Yes


3.3. Ongoing coordinated activities

There have been no previous international working groups for this species. An informal international working group was set up during the development of this ISSAP. This group will be formalised and expanded under AEWA to form the inter-governmental AEWA Eurasian Curlew International Working Group (AEWA EC IWG) in 2015. The EC IWG will coordinate the implementation of the ISSAP.

An EU Management Plan for Curlew (Jensen & Lutz 2006) was adopted for the period 2007-2009, but was not updated. A new EU project was launched in 2015 concerning species action planning for priority species in the EU and as part of this initiative will be produced a EU multi-species action plan for grassland waders, including the Curlew.



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