The Availability of Indium: The Present, Medium Term, and Long Term



Yüklə 1,06 Mb.

səhifə12/40
tarix06.03.2018
ölçüsü1,06 Mb.
1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   ...   40

 

18 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

beneficiation (separation and concentration); (3) smelting; and (4) refining. Each stage is 

discussed in detail in Section 3.5.1 through 3.5.3.  

3.5.1  Comminution 

Comminution is the method by which the size of solid materials is reduced by crushing, 

grinding, and other processes. Breaking the rock into smaller fragments helps to either liberate 

certain particles of interest or increase the surface area to facilitate processing. 

This part of the process occurs at the mine site, sometimes very early in the mining process, such 

as in the open pit or underground (with a crusher) to break the mineral-bearing ore to a small 

enough size to facilitate its transport to the treatment plant. Once the material is transported into 

the plant, several types of crushers, mills, and screens are often used in sequence (with feedback 

loops) to reduce the material to a fine enough fraction for recovery.  

3.5.2  Beneficiation 

The exact transition between comminution and beneficiation is not clearly defined, but generally, 

beneficiation is the process whereby extracted ore from mining is separated into mineral and 

gangue


15

 (the former being suitable for further processing or direct use).  

In the processing of many base metals, such as copper, lead, zinc, and nickel, this first stage of 

beneficiation occurs at the mine site. But full separation/beneficiation cannot be completed at the 

mine due to the metallurgical complexities and scale of operation required.  

Instead, the mill (or treatment plant on site) separates the compounds from the ore by flotation to 

produce concentrates, which are the typical products from a base metal mine. The concentrates 

are then transported to a smelter that is usually a long distance from the mine. The concentrates 

often contain small quantities of precious or special metals such as gold, indium, or tellurium, 

which can improve the value, and may contain undesirable impurities such as mercury, sulfur, or 

arsenic, which reduce the value.  

In the case of indium-bearing zinc sulfide ores (sphalerite), the indium may only be as 

concentrated as 1–100 ppm in the sphalerite; the zinc grade might be as low as 2% (20,000 ppm). 

After passing through the treatment plant, 50%–70% of the indium contained in the ore may 

report to the concentrate. Typically, indium occurs in the concentrate at 120 ppm

16

 to 170 ppm



17

 

(Alfantazi and Moskalyk 2003). This concentration varies greatly by mine (i.e., the technology in 



use at a given mine) and by deposit (i.e., the grade and metallurgical complexity). For example, 

the Peruvian and Bolivian zinc concentrates have 187 ppm and 630 ppm of indium content, 

respectively, which makes these two countries major indium players compared to their share of 

world zinc production (Moss et al. 2011). 

                                                 

15

 Gangue refers to material of little to no economic value that surrounds, or is closely mixed with, a wanted mineral in an ore 



deposit. 

16

 The zinc residues feeding the Akita plant in Japan are reported to have this indium concentration level (Alfantazi 2003). 



17

 As anticipated by Ausmelt of Australia (Alfantazi and Moskalyk 2003). 




 

19 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

3.5.3  Smelting  

Once zinc concentrate is transported to a smelter, zinc metal can be produced via either 

pyrometallurgical or hydrometallurgical processes. About 90% of total zinc refining is done 

through hydrometallurgical processes; thus, we describe and focus on this process. 

The hydrometallurgical zinc smelting generally consists of four separate stages (see Figure 8):  

1.  The Waelz process (often referred to as calcining/roasting). A mixture of zinc 

concentrate and coal is heated at high temperatures to produce a calcine of impure zinc 

oxide. 


2.  Leaching. The calcine is then leached with sulfuric acid in either a single- or double-

leach process to produce a zinc sulfate solution. 



3.  Purification. The solution is purified with zinc dust to precipitate the impurities in the 

solution. During this stage indium and other elements such as copper or cadmium can be 

recovered. 

4.  Electrowinning. The aqueous zinc solution is contained in an electrolytic cell and an 

electric current from a lead-silver alloy anode is used to deposit zinc onto the aluminum 

cathode. Zinc can then be stripped from the aluminum cathodes and melted and cast into 

ingots (ILO 2012). 

  

Leaching



Roasting & calcine

Sintering

Roasting & calcine

Zinc ore

Sphalerite (ZnS)

Zn( 3-11%), Cd (0.001-0.2%) In -(0.0001-0.01%) - (Fthenakis et al., 2007)

In (0.001% to 0.002%)  - (Alfantazi and Moskalyk 2003)

~90%


~10%

Pyrometallurgical 

process

Hydrometallurgical 

process

Sinter


Purification

Retorting

Molten Zn

Electrolysis

Melting & casting

Precipitates of: Cd, 

sludge, Ge, In, Ga, 

Pb & Zn.

Slab Zinc

30%Zn, 30%Pb, 3.5%As, 3%Cd, 

0.4%In (Fthenakis et al., 2007)

0.32% Ga, 0.58% In (Roskill, 2010)

 

Figure 8. Smelting of zinc ores to yield zinc slabs and indium precipitate 

 

3.5.4  Refining 

The main source of indium for primary refining is from the fumes, dusts, slags, and residues in 

zinc smelting. Refineries can sometimes be located near the smelters in a “combined” 

metallurgical complex, as was the case with Xstrata’s Kidd Creek smelter, or they can be 

separate standalone refineries that source their feed materials on global markets, as is the case 






Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   ...   40


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə