The Availability of Indium: The Present, Medium Term, and Long Term



Yüklə 1,06 Mb.

səhifə13/40
tarix06.03.2018
ölçüsü1,06 Mb.
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   ...   40

 

20 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

with Umicore’s Hoboken plant in Belgium. As with data on production, information on refinery 

technology and processing methodology is generally difficult to obtain, because processes are 

proprietary and a large part of the production is in China. Figure 9 summarizes the process 

described in Fthenakis et al. (2007), which is in turn based on Ullmann’s encyclopedia and other 

information from manufacturers’ reports. 

As described in Section 3.5.3, after roasting the zinc oxides undergo leaching and purification

which precipitates indium in a solution pregnant with other minerals such as zinc, arsenic, and 

cadmium. As detailed in Figure 9, the precipitates formed in zinc refining undergo a series of 

leaching steps, followed by cementation. The cements are then washed and pressed to form 

briquettes that are refined in a furnace and poured into ingots (Fthenakis et al. 2009 and  

de Souza 2010). 



Precipitates of: Cd, sludge, Ge, In, 

Ga, Pb & Zn.

30%Zn, 30%Pb, 3.5%As, 3%Cd, 

0.4%In (Fthenakis et al., 2007)

Pre-leaching in 

dilute H

2

SO



4

Leaching in dilute 

HCl

50-65%, Pb, 1% Zn, 



0.15%In

, 0.2-0.3% 

As

6%Zn, 50%Pb, 



0.68%In

Neutralization 

(pH 1)

20% As, 5-10% Sn, 



5%Sb, 

0.2% In

3g/L In, 15g/L As, 

20-40g/L Zn, 6g/L Cd

Precipitation of In

Filtrate: 40g/L Zn, 

6g/L Cd, 1g/L As, 

10-50mg/L In

NaOH Leaching

10% As, 8%Zn, 

10%In, 0.6%Cd

10g/L As, 4g/L Zn, 

0.2g/L Sn, 60g/L 

NaOH


20%In, 1.5%-3%As, 

6%Zn, 0.5-2% Cd

Leaching in dilute 

HCL


Cementation of Cu 

with Fe


Fe

Cu-As cement

Cementation of Sn 

and Pb with In

In

Cementation of In 



with Al

Al

Indium cement

Firing in furnace 

with chloride



Indium ingots

Losses

Inputs

Intermediate products

Legend


 

Figure 9. Advanced refining of indium from the precipitates of zinc smelting 

 

Note: % refers to the weight % (i.e., concentration) of the output. Sources: Fthenakis et al. (2009) and de Souza 



(2011) 

 

The product is normally at least 99.99% pure; however, at least 97% purity can also be achieved 



if the impurities are high; purities kept in check may have a final indium purity higher than 

99.995%. The total recovery of refining is ~80% (Alfantazi 2003; de Souza 2011). 




 

21 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

3.5.5  Costs of Refining 

Although the price structures for indium sponge and other forms of indium are negotiated with 

refineries on a case-by-case basis, sales contracts generally feature: (1) price discounts used in 

long-term off-take contract agreements; (2) refining charges for upgrading 95% to 99% indium 

products to 4N8 (99.998%) grade indium metal; and (3) terms will reflect refining yields 

(Thibault et al. 2010).  

Based on a recent feasibility study for a mine in Canada, a toll treatment charge of approximately 

CAD 66/kg of 4N8 indium produced from 95% pure indium sponge received is approximately 

representative of current refining costs and efficiencies (Table 7). 

Table 7. Indium Refining Terms for Indium Sponge Revenue Calculations Used in 

NI 43-10118 Report for Mount Pleasant Property 

 

Parameter 

Units 

Value 

Notes 

Price discount factor for 

indium sponge 

87.5% 



Typical discount used for pricing indium 

sponge relative to 4N grade indium 

Recovery of indium in 

refining process

19

 

Wt% 



93.0% 

No payment is received for indium lost 

during refining process 

Total refining and penalty 

charge 

CAD/kg 


4N8 

indium


20

 

$66 



Charge based on refining 95% (by wt.) 

indium sponge to 4N8 grade indium 

 

Source: Thibault et al. (2010)



 

By comparison, when shipping concentrates for toll processing by refiners, one can expect to 

obtain 53% and 15% of the final market price of zinc and indium, respectively, because of 

deductions. (Exact figures will vary depending on the unique characteristics of the concentrate.) 

When shipping indium sponge, one would expect to achieve 71% credit of the final market price 

(Thibault et al. 2010). 



3.5.6  Overall Recovery Efficiency 

Principally because of its low economic contribution to zinc and other base metal producers and 

the complexity of metallurgical extraction, the overall recovery of primary indium over its value 

chain is poor. Typically, less than 20% of the indium content in concentrates is extracted to yield 

indium metal, but higher indium prices and technological developments can make it 

economically viable for mines, smelters, and refineries to invest to increase yields and capacities. 

A study undertaken by Indium Corp. shows that only approximately 30% of the total indium 

mined annually becomes refined indium metal (Mikolajczak 2009). Our calculations put the 

overall recovery closer to 15%–20% and, as depicted in Figure 10, the major causes of the low 

overall recovery rate follow:  

                                                 

18

 NI 43-101 (or National Instrument 43-101) represents the Canadian standard for reporting economic and mineral resource 



information for companies traded on Canadian stock exchanges. 

19

 One would expect the latest estimates of recovery efficiency to exceed industry averages (~80%, Alfantazi



 and

 

Moskalyk 



2003 and de Souza 2011) as new or planned facilities would use the latest technologies. 

20

 As of April 27, 2012, 1 CAD = 0.98 USD. 






Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   ...   40


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə