The Availability of Indium: The Present, Medium Term, and Long Term



Yüklə 1,06 Mb.

səhifə14/40
tarix06.03.2018
ölçüsü1,06 Mb.
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   40

 

22 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

  Based on the process described for zinc mining and processing, only 50%–70% of the 



indium contained in the ores is recovered by the on-mine treatment plant and report to the 

zinc concentrate. 

  Of these indium-pregnant zinc concentrates, 30% are not sent to indium-capable smelters 



(Mikolajczak 2009) and are lost to smelter tailings or slag heaps.  

  The indium in the remaining indium-pregnant concentrates that  sent to indium-capable 



smelters is recovered at an average rate of ~50% in an impure form (Mikolajczak 2009), 

such as a sponge. 

  The impure indium is sent for advanced refining at various special metal refineries where 



the recovery rate averages ~80%.  

Zinc ore

 100 units indium

Zinc concentrate

50–70 units indium

50-70%


Mine tailing

30–50 units indium

30-50%


Non-indium capable 

smelter

15–21 units indium

30%


Indium-capable 

smelter

35–49 units indium

70%


Smelter waste

18–25 units indium

Refinery

18–25 units indium

50%


50%

Refinery waste

4–5 units indium

20%


Indium (+99.97%)

14–20 units indium

80%


 

For every 100 units of indium metal mined along with zinc ores, only ~15–20 units is recovered as refined metal. 



Figure 10. Indium value chain and overall recovery efficiency 

(Schwarz-Schampera and Herzig 2002; Mikolajczak 2009) 

 

Heath Steele reports that 35.8% of indium in ore is reported to tailings and 51.4% went to zinc tailings (Schwarz-



Schampera and Herzig 2002).  

Brunswick 6 and 12 mills reportedly recovered only 58.9% of the indium in zinc concentrate (Schwarz-Schampera 

and Herzig 2002). 

At Toyoha, the recovery of indium in zinc concentrates was ~96% (same as estimated for zinc recovery in zinc 

concentrate). This mine was a main product indium producer, so these high recoveries are unlikely to be 

representative of byproduct indium producers. 

Indium recovery in mine concentrates is ~50%–70%. 

 

As detailed above, the cumulative effect of these losses results in only 15%–20% of mined 



indium being recovered. This suggests at least one explanation for the mismatch between our 

estimates of mined indium and those for refined metal production. Given the low overall 

recovery efficiency and cumulative losses of indium throughout the value chain, the figures for 

total mined indium production presented in Table 3 (629 tonnes in 2013) could be significantly 

underestimated.  

The data on indium demand as well as primary refined indium provide useful benchmarks and 

support an estimate of primary refined metal of 640–822 tonnes. Furthermore, various sources 

tend to confirm an overall recovery efficiency of 15%–30%. With this in mind, and assuming 

that the overall indium recovery efficiency corresponding with zinc ores is similar to those of 

other main product ores, the total potential tonnes of indium mined in 2011 could be 2,130–5,870 

tonnes, as tabulated in Table 8. The upper end of this range is almost an order of magnitude 



 

23 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

greater than the estimate of 615 tonnes when using a methodology adopted by Roskill (2010).

21

 

Because the data on indium content in base metals ores are (according to Roskill’s own 



admission) highly uncertain, and because we have more data points and confidence in our 

estimates of overall recovery efficiency and levels of primary refined indium production, we 

believe the mined indium estimate to more likely be ~5,200 tpa, coinciding with the midpoint of 

the high scenario identified in Table 8. We use this figure in subsequent calculations. 



Table 8. Estimates of Potential Indium Mined Along With Main Product Ores 

  

  



USGS 

Own Estimates 

Midpoint 

Refined metal production (tpa) 

640 

822 


730 

Corresponding potential tonnes of contained indium mined per annum (tpa)

a

 

Low



b

 

 



2,133 

2,740 


2,437 

Med


b

 

 



3,265 

4,194 


3,730 

High


b

 

 



4,571 

5,871 


5,221 

Range 


  

2,133 to 5,871 tpa 

5,221 

 

a



 Estimates of potential indium mined per annum are calculated as follows: tonnes mined per annum = refined metal 

produced/overall recovery efficiencies.

 

b

 The corresponding recovery efficiencies for low, mid, and high estimates of tonnes indium mined are 30%, 20%, 



and 14%, respectively. 

Sources: Own estimates; Mikolajczak (2009); USGS estimates (i.e., Tolcin 2011a and 2012a) 

 

3.6  Summary of Primary Production 

As noted in Table 8, total global production of primary refined indium metal in 2013 was 770 

tonnes. In recent years primary indium production was ~640–822 tpa. China is the largest 

producer of refined indium with ~50%–55% of global production. The remaining 45%–50% of 

primary indium production is distributed among countries such as Belgium Canada, Japan, and 

South Korea.  

An analysis of overall indium recoveries has shown that significant losses of 70%–85% occur 

throughout the value chain, representing a significant opportunity for increasing indium supply 

in the short to medium term. 

Until now, we have focused on summarizing existing supply characteristics of primary indium. 

We now turn to estimating a supply curve for current indium production, which involves not 

only estimates of indium quantities but the price at which indium can be produced. As is often 

the case with mineral properties, the best and most detailed information available for costs and 

efficiencies is contained in technical reports filed with the securities exchanges by midsized and 

junior mining companies as part of their disclosure requirements.

22

 Information in these reports 



can then be used together with the distribution of indium concentration in currently known 

                                                 

21

 This methodology is incompatible with the methodology adopted by Roskill, because recovery of indium from ores efficiency 



would need to be greater than 100%. Alternatively, a significant amount of primary indium would have to be produced from non-

mined sources, which represents an unlikely scenario. 

22

 Often, large mining companies are not required to disclose detailed technical information about development projects or 



ongoing operations, because the performance of a single operation is, in many cases, not significant to the overall value of the 

company. 






Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   40


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə