The Availability of Indium: The Present, Medium Term, and Long Term



Yüklə 1,06 Mb.

səhifə15/40
tarix06.03.2018
ölçüsü1,06 Mb.
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   ...   40

 

24 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

deposits (Schwarz-Schampera and Herzig 2002), recovery efficiencies, costs of capital, etc., to 

generate a representative view of costs and production levels for various deposits. We adopt this 

approach when examining what a supply curve for indium might currently look like and how this 

might change going forward, and we use a Monte Carlo simulation to generate a short-term 

supply curve. A detailed description of the methodology used to generate these curves is 

included in Appendix D.  

Figure 11 shows that producers require a minimum indium price of $100/kg (in 2011 U.S. dollar 

[USD] terms) to be incentivized to produce indium. Below this price level, even the highest 

grade deposits cannot economically recover indium. At prices of ~$150/kg and ~$300/kg of 

refined metal produced, indium supply is highly elastic. These two steps in the supply curve 

represent byproduct and coproduct production, respectively.

23

 As a result, changes to indium 



prices above or below $150 and $300 will trigger significant supply responses. At prices higher 

than $350/kg, indium supply is highly inelastic in the short term where short run production is 

constrained by limitations at production facilities. As a result, an increase in price has virtually 

no effect on supply because producers need time to change metallurgical processes or plant 

capacities to deliver a supply response. 

 

Figure 11. Indium supply (2011) 



 

When considering overall recovery rates in the short term and the amount of indium that could 

potentially be recovered from current mining operations, we consider three scenarios:  

1.  Status quo. Estimates of refined primary indium from existing mines given recovery 

efficiencies throughout the value chain. 

                                                 

23

 We distinguish byproduct from coproduct producers as companies that produce indium but allocate no fixed or “common” 



costs to production versus those who allocate to indium production their share of fixed or common costs in addition to their own 

direct costs. 

 -

 100


 200

 300


 400

 500


 600

 700


 800

 900


 1,000

 -

 100



 200

 300


 400

 500


 600

 700


 800

U

S$/



kg 

of

 ref



ined 

indi


um

 m

et



al

 

 (2011 



U

S$)


 

Annual production  

(tonnes of primary indium metal per annum) 

Short-term primary indium supply curve 




 

25 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

2.  Scenario 1. Estimates of refined primary indium if the pipeline were structured such that 

all indium-bearing concentrates were sent to indium-capable smelters, but assuming 

current recovery rates. 

3.  Scenario 2. Estimates of refined primary indium given in Scenario 1, but also assuming 

that recovery efficiencies reflect the latest technologies. This estimate also ignores any 

necessary investment and time delays. 

These scenarios are discussed in significant detail in Appendix D. Figure 12 shows that, when 

varying efficiency across the pipeline such that all indium-bearing concentrates are shipped to 

indium-capable smelters, overall recovery of the refined metal increases from 731 tpa in the base 

case to 1,044 tpa, corresponding with overall recovery rates of 20%–28%. Once we vary 

recovery efficiencies to correspond with current technologies, indium recovery increases to 

2,710–3,348 tpa with a midpoint of 2,976 tpa. This corresponds with overall recovery rates of 

64%–73%. 

 

Figure 12. Short-term primary indium supply. including pipeline efficiency improvements 

 

The general stepwise shapes of the three supply curves in Figure 12 are consistent with Figure 11 



but have been stretched to match the corresponding total supply in each scenario. The three 

curves show the significant effect that increased indium recovery efficiency (either through 

technology or better management) can have on the total availability of primary indium in the 

short term. 



3.7  Secondary Production 

China, South Korea, and Japan have recently focused on recovering indium from manufacturing 

wastes and EOL products—a practice known collectively as secondary production. Secondary 

production of indium can result from two sources of supply: new scrap, which consists of waste 

generated in the manufacturing process; and old scrap, which consists of EOL consumer 

products. Significant indium recovery currently occurs from the recycling of new scrap 

(manufacturing waste), but the highly dissipative nature of indium in consumer products means 

that very little old scrap is currently recycled. 

 -

 100


 200

 300


 400

 500


 600

 700


 800

 900


 1,000

 -

 500



 1,000

 1,500


 2,000

 2,500


 3,000

 3,500


U

S$/


kg 

of

 ref



ined 

indi


um

 m

et



al

 

 (2011 



U

S$)


 

Annual production  

(tonnes of primary indium metal per annum) 

Short-term primary indium supply curves 

status quo

Scenario 1

Scenario 2





Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   ...   40


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə