The Availability of Indium: The Present, Medium Term, and Long Term



Yüklə 1,06 Mb.

səhifə19/40
tarix06.03.2018
ölçüsü1,06 Mb.
1   ...   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   ...   40

 

32 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

(25%, 128 tonnes). By comparison, Roskill (2010) estimates total secondary production at 602 

tonnes and Gibson and Hayes (2011) estimate 630 tonnes.  

As detailed in Table 11, after combining primary (770 tonnes) and secondary supply (610 

tonnes), we estimate total global refined indium supply at 1,380 tonnes in 2013. After including 

secondary production, China’s dominance in the sector is reduced from its 53% market share to 

40% of overall supply. When using the Herfindahl–Hirschman Index (HHI) to estimate market 

concentration by country, we calculate an HHI of ~2,870 for total indium supply, compared to 

~3,370 when estimating concentration for primary refinery production only.

30

 The decrease is 



principally due to the decreased market share of Chinese producers when including secondary 

supply. 


Table 11. Total Indium Production (2013) 

2013 Indium Refinery Production 

  

  

Primary Supply 

 

Secondary Supply 

(i.e., Primary 

Supply Abatement) 

 

Total 

  

  

tonnes 



 

tonnes 



 

tonnes 

Belgium 


  

30 


4% 

 

51 



8% 

 

81 



6% 

Canada 


  

65 


8% 

 



1% 

 

70 



5% 

China 


  

410 


53% 

 

150 



25% 

 

560 



40% 

Germany 


  

n/a 


0% 

 



0% 

 



0% 

Japan 


  

71 


9% 

 

362 



59% 

 

433 



31% 

Peru 


  

10 


1% 

 

n/a 



n/a 

 

10 



1% 

Russia 


  

13 


2% 

 

n/a 



n/a 

 

13 



1% 

South Korea 

  

150 


19% 

 

40 



7% 

 

190 



14% 

Others 


  

25 


3% 

 

n/a 



n/a 

 

25 



2% 

Total 

  

770 

100% 

 

610 

100% 

 

1,380 

100% 

Source: Table 5 and Table 10 

 

Figure 15 and Figure 16 show that the total indium supply curve keeps its general shape from 



Section 3.6. Supply is highly elastic at $150–$300/kg. That is, a small change in price induces a 

relatively large change in quantity supplied. This suggests a price floor for indium of ~$150/kg. 

At lower prices very little indium is produced, and at prices lower than $200, virtually no 

secondary supply is produced. Short-term indium supply becomes inelastic at prices higher than 

$300/kg because of capacity constraints; a price increase thus induces little, if any, additional 

supply. 


                                                 

30

 The U.S. Department of Justice normally considers an HHI of 1,500–2,500 points to be moderately concentrated; markets in 



which the HHI exceeds 2,500 points are believed to be highly concentrated. 


 

33 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

 

Figure 15. Comparison of short-term primary and total indium supply 



 

 

Figure 16. Comparison of short-term total indium supply under 



differing assumptions of pipeline efficiency 

 

 

 -

 100



 200

 300


 400

 500


 600

 700


 800

 900


 1,000

 -

 250



 500

 750


 1,000

 1,250


 1,500

U

S$/



kg 

of

 ref



ined 

indi


um

 m

et



al

 

 (2011 



U

S$)


 

Annual production  

(tonnes of indium metal per annum) 

Short-term indium supply curves 

primary supply

 -

 100



 200

 300


 400

 500


 600

 700


 800

 900


 1,000

 -

 1,000



 2,000

 3,000


 4,000

U

S$/



kg 

of

 ref



ined 

indi


um

 m

et



al

   


   

 

(2011 



U

S$)


 

Annual production  

(tonnes of indium metal per annum) 

Total short-term indium supply curves 

status quo

Scenario 1

Scenario 2





Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   ...   40


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə