The Availability of Indium: The Present, Medium Term, and Long Term



Yüklə 1,06 Mb.

səhifə20/40
tarix06.03.2018
ölçüsü1,06 Mb.
1   ...   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   ...   40

 

34 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

4  Supply: the Medium-Term Outlook (5–20 years) 

When thinking about supply in the medium term (loosely defined here to be 5–20 years), 

additional indium supply can come from several additional sources. As shown conceptually in 

Figure 17, these sources include: 

  Increased recovery efficiency. This can be either through operational improvements, or 



by ensuring that indium contained in zinc or other base metal concentrates is shipped to 

indium-capable smelters and refineries.  

  Operations that currently do not recover indium. This can occur by expanding or 



modifying processing facilities to recover indium that is currently not recovered. Because 

this option would require an investment in new technologies or capacity, it requires that 

prices and metal recoveries justify the additional capital and operating costs.  

  New byproduct production. This could be through the byproduct recovery of indium 



from zinc (or other) mines that currently are not in production. Indium would be 

recovered as a byproduct in these cases, so the price required to justify its recovery would 

need to cover the incremental costs only; all other costs (such as mining, administration, 

and other fixed costs) would be allocated to main product production. 

  Increased secondary production from EOL materials (i.e., recycling of consumer 



waste). 

  Increased secondary production from the recycling of manufacturing waste. This 



can be done by: (1) increasing the efficiency of the secondary refining process; and (2) 

increasing the quantity of manufacturing waste being recycled. 

  Recovery of indium through new main product supply, which might occur if indium 



deposits are discovered and developed where the principal metal of economic 

interest is indium. To our knowledge, there are currently no main product indium 

producers; however, the Toyoha mine in Japan has produced main product indium in the 

past. Main product indium is normally high-cost indium because the indium content of 

the deposit has to justify all costs associated with developing the property, including the 

initial discovery costs, mining, treatment, and administration costs as well as the costs of 

associated capital (i.e., the investment must earn a minimum required return on capital). 




 

35 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

 

Figure 17. Illustrative medium-term indium supply curve 



 

4.1  Expansion of Zinc (or Other Main Product) Production 

Between 2007 and 2011, zinc production expanded at a CAGR of 2.4% (Appendix A). The 

International Lead and Zinc Study Group forecast production growth at 3.9% (White 2012), with 

increased output anticipated at a number of Peruvian, Bolivian, and Mexican mines. With these 

increases to zinc production in mind, and given production of ~730 tpa of indium (mainly 

derived as the byproduct from zinc production), we extrapolate medium-term indium production 

on the basis of historical expansion of zinc production. This is shown below for growth scenarios 

of 2%–3% annual expansion of zinc production. As Table 12 shows, on this basis, 2016 

production could be 807–847 tonnes with an average of 827 tonnes. If this expansion continues 

until 2031, byproduct indium production could reach ~1,200–1,531 tonnes. For our estimates we 

use average values of 827 tonnes and 1,365 tonnes in 2016 and 2031, respectively. 

Table 12. Medium-Term Estimates of Indium Primary Refinery Production 

Main product growth

a

 CAGR, % 

 

2011 

2016ᵇ 

2031ᵇ 

2.0% 


 

731 


807 

1,199 


3.0% 

 

731 



847 

1,531 


Average 

  

731 

827 

1,365 

 

a



 Main product CAGR ranged based on historical zinc production growth between 2007 and 2011 as calculated from 

USGS data and estimates from the International Lead and Zinc Study Group (White 2012). 

b

 Assumes that recovery rates continue and that the proportion of hydrometallurgical processing remains unchanged 



over the extrapolation period. 

 

To identify individual producers that are likely to form part of medium-term supply, we surveyed 



company reports and identified the following six advanced stage deposits that have a potential 

combined supply contribution of 150–155 tpa. The two largest potential new sources of supply 

are the Mount Pleasant deposit in eastern Canada, with a potential to produce 38.5 tpa of indium, 

and the Maklu Khota deposit in Bolivia, with a potential production of 76 tpa. Summary 

0

500


1,000

1,500


2,000

2,500


3,000

81



 

15



22

29



37



44

51



58



66

73



80



87

95



1,

02



1,

09



1,

17



1,

24



1,

31



1,

38



1,

46



1,

53



1,

60



1,

67



1,

75



1,

82



1,

89



1,

96



2,

04



2,

11



2,

18



2,

25



2,

33



2,

40





Co

st

:   

  $

/k

g m

et

al

 pr

oduc

ed

Annual output

Critical Element Supply  Curve

Existing production at 

existing efficiencies

Increasing 

recovery 

efficiency

New main-

product supply.

Add recovery circuit 

to existing refineries

Note: For illustrative purposes only.

Deposit 1

Deposit 100+

Increased recovery efficiency and new 

sources of supply can shift and extend the 

supply curve over the medium to long run.

Recycle consumer 

waste 




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   ...   40


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə