The Availability of Indium: The Present, Medium Term, and Long Term



Yüklə 1,06 Mb.

səhifə25/40
tarix06.03.2018
ölçüsü1,06 Mb.
1   ...   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   ...   40

 

43 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

 

Zinc ore



 100 units indium

Zinc concentrate

50–70 units indium

50-70%


Mine tailing

30–50 units indium

30-50%


Non-indium capable 

smelter

15–21 units indium

30%


Indium-capable 

smelter

35–49 units indium

70%


Smelter waste

18–25 units indium

Refinery

18–25 units indium

50%


50%

Refinery waste

4–5 units indium

20%


Indium (+99.97%)

14–20 units indium

80%


 

Figure 18. Indium value chain and overall recovery efficiency 

For every 100 units of indium metal mined along with zinc ores, only ~15 to 20 units is recovered as refined metal 

Source: derived from Schwarz-Schampera and Herzig (2002) and Mikolajczak (2009) 

 

1



 Heath Steele reports that 35.8% of indium in ore ended up in tailings and 51.4% went to zinc tailings (Schwartz-Schampera 

and Herzig 2002).  

2

 Brunswick 6 and 12 mills reportedly recovered recovery of only 58.9% of In in Zn concentrate (Schwartz-Schampera and 



Herzig 2002). 

3

 At Toyoha, the recovery of indium in zinc concentrates was ~96% (same as estimated for zinc recovery in zinc 



concentrate). This mine was a main product indium producer, so these high recoveries are unlikely to be representative of 

byproduct indium producers. 

To allow for some upside, indium recovery in mine concentrates is estimated to fall be50%–70%. 



 

The remaining 80%–85% that is not immediately recovered as indium metal and remains 

associated with other elements and impurities as residue accumulates in tailings and other 

dumps. These resources could be available for recovery at a later stage if prices and costs justify 

their extraction.  

Although smelters are locked into current technologies, as they become due for rebuilds or 

upgrades newer technologies may be introduced that could significantly increase the recovery 

rate. For example, according to the NI 43-101 compliant

35

 Preliminary Assessment for Adex 



Mining’s polymetallic Mount Pleasant property in New Brunswick, Canada, anticipated overall 

recovery efficiency of indium is expected to be 83.05% (wt%) at the point of zinc concentrate 

and 75.4% (wt%) when indium is recovered in sponge form containing ~95% purity indium

36

 



(Thibault et al. 2010). By comparison, the recovery efficiency of indium is expected to be ~75% 

at the point of zinc concentrate for Argentex’s planned development of the Pinguino deposit in 

Argentina (Gray et al. 2011) and 81% at the point of crude metal at South American Silver’s 

Malku Khota deposit (Armitage et al. 2011). 

The overall recovery of indium in zinc concentrates could thus conceivably be 75%–85% in the 

medium term. Such an increase would by itself increase the overall indium recovery rate from 

14%–20% (Figure 18) to ~21%–24%. Assuming a further recovery efficiency improvement in 

new smelters of 90% efficiency (as implied by the Mount Pleasant estimate) the overall recovery 

increases from 21%–24% to 38%–43%. Finally, assuming a further increase in recovery 

efficiency from 80%–95% at the refinery stage increases the overall indium recovery efficiency 

to 45%–51%.  

                                                 

35

 NI 43-101 (or National Instrument 43-101) represents the Canadian standard for reporting economic and mineral resource 



information for companies traded on Canadian stock exchanges. 

36

 This is the minimum specification for feed to conventional electro-refining circuit (Thibault et al. 2010). 




 

44 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

4.3  Summary Expansion of Primary Supply 

The short-term supply curves presented earlier represent the quantities of indium currently 

available at prices sufficient to cover variable production costs. The medium-term curves that 

follow embody several adjustments: 

  Capital costs are included. Because operators have the option to invest in new capacity 



or shut down in the medium term, we adjust costs to reflect returns to capital and 

eliminate all realizations in the simulation that would not generate positive returns for 

investors.  

  Variation in the long-term main-product average prices is used in assessing 



feasibility. Readers should examine the long-term historical prices of tin and zinc in 

Figure 28 in 2011 U.S. dollars as indicated. More detail regarding how this is performed 

is included in Appendix D. 

  Recoveries reflect latest commercially available technologies.  



  Quantities reflect current production capacity and quantities contained in mineral 



deposits with published resources that could be in production over the medium 

term, as well as potential recovery improvements discussed above

Using the projected byproduct indium supply levels summarized in Table 12, as well as the 

potential improvements to recovery efficiency details in Section 4.2, we generate a series of 

medium-term supply scenarios. Briefly, these are: 

  Base case 2016. Based on current levels of recovery efficiency, 2011 production (731 



tonnes) adjusted to reflect projected main product expansion (mainly zinc), and 

associated indium recovery. 

  Adjusted 2016, base case + improved recovery and pipeline efficiency (2016). Uses 



the base case 2016 levels but builds in improved overall pipeline efficiency described in 

Section 4.2. This is similar to the approach taken in generating short-term primary supply 

scenarios. But because we now consider the medium term, capital costs associated with 

these efficiency improvements are reflected in the cost of indium. 

  Base case 2031. Based on current levels of indium recovery efficiency, 2011 production 



(731 tonnes), and projected main product expansion (again, mainly zinc) between 2011 

and 2031.  

  Adjusted 2031, base case + improved recovery and pipeline efficiency (2031). Per the 



adjusted 2016 case, except byproduct indium production has been forecasted to 2031. 

Figure 19 contains the supply curves for the base cases. Compared to the primary supply curve 

shown in Figure 11, the cost curves have shifted upward because capital costs are now included. 

In the medium term primary indium supply seems to be elastic at prices of $350–$450/kg and 

inelastic at prices higher than $800 and lower than ~$275.  





Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   ...   40


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə