The Availability of Indium: The Present, Medium Term, and Long Term



Yüklə 1,06 Mb.

səhifə27/40
tarix06.03.2018
ölçüsü1,06 Mb.
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   ...   40

 

48 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

Table 18. Potential Expansion of Secondary Supply From Manufacturing Waste 

Potential Medium-Term Secondary Indium Supply 

 

  



2011 

2016 

2031 

Indium Demand in ITO Applications (Tonnes Indium)

a

 

Low: @3% CAGR 

 

1,033 


1,198 

1,866 


Medium: @5% CAGR 

 

1,033 



1,319 

2,741 


High: @7% CAGR 

 

1,033 



1,449 

3,998 


Average 

  

1,033 



1,322 

2,869 


Tonnes of Indium Fed Into Recycling Plants

b

 

Low 


 

936 


1,085 

1,691 


Medium 

 

936 



1,195 

2,484 


High 

 

936 



1,313 

3,623 


Average 

  

936 



1,198 

2,599 


Estimated Secondary Supply (Tonnes Indium @ 65% Recycling Efficiency) 

Low 


 

609 


705 

1,099 


Medium 

 

609 



777 

1,615 


High 

 

609 



853 

2,355 


Average 

  

609 



778 

1,689 


Scenario 1: Estimated Secondary Supply @ 90% Efficiency 

Low 


 

609 


977 

1,522 


Medium 

 

609 



1,075 

2,236 


High 

 

609 



1,182 

3,260 


Average 

  

609 



1,078 

2,339 


 

a

 Indium demand in ITO applications is derived from a linear interpolation of the European 



Commission’s (Moss et al. 2010) total indium demand forecasts and assumptions that ITO usage 

will continue to comprise 84% of total demand as shown in Figure 1. 

b

 Indium fed into recycling plants calculated as estimated secondary supply ÷ 65%. 



 

4.5  Summary of Medium-Term Supply 

Without any improvements to technology or pipeline efficiency, we estimate indium primary 

production to be approximately 730, 830, and 1,365 tpa in 2011, 2016, and 2031, respectively 

(Table 19). Production is currently relatively concentrated, with about half in China, and we do 

not expect this to change significantly in the medium term. When including the possibility for 

greater recovery and pipeline efficiency, primary and secondary production could more than 

double to 3,370 and 5,560 tonnes, respectively, thus highlighting the significant impact that 

advancements in technology can have on supply.  

Significant secondary supply of approximately 610 tonnes currently takes place close to high-

tech manufacturing centers such as Japan, South Korea, and China. As demand for flat-panel 

displays expands, we estimate that secondary supply could reach levels of 780 and 1,690 tonnes 

in 2016 and 2031. When considering the potential for improvements in recycling recovery rates

secondary supply could be as much as 1,080 and 2,340 tonnes over the same period. As 

previously noted, secondary supply from manufacturing waste is not a substitute for primary 

supply, and although recycling can significantly reduce primary indium demand (and thus reduce 

short-term supply shortages or risks), secondary supply from manufacturing waste does not 

address long-term supply risks. 



 

49 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

Table 19. Total Indium Production (2011, 2016, and 2031) 

 

 



2011 

2016 

2031 

tonnes 

% of total 

tonnes 

% of total 

tonnes 

% of total 

Base Case Scenario 

Primary 


731 

55% 

827 


52% 

1,365 


45% 

Secondary 

609 

45% 

778 


48% 

1,689 


55% 

Total 

1,340 

100% 

1,606 

100% 

2,143 

100% 

Adjusted Scenario: Improved Recovery and Pipeline Efficiency 

Primary 


 

 

3,368 


76% 

5,557 


70% 

Secondary 

 

 

1,078 


24% 

2,339 


30% 

Total 

3,819 

100% 

4,446 

100% 

7,896 

100% 

Adjusted scenario/ 

base case 

 

 

2.8x 

 

3.4x 

 

 

As shown in Figure 24 (2016) and Figure 25 (2031), the total indium supply curve keeps its 



general shape from Section 3.6, but the curves are shifted upward because the direct and 

opportunity costs of capital are now included in the curve. This increase to overall cost is 

somewhat offset by projected efficiency improvements that spread fixed costs over more units of 

recovered indium, and therefore lead to a lower average cost for indium production.  

 

Figure 23. Comparison of medium-term primary and total indium supply in 2016 

 -

 100



 200

 300


 400

 500


 600

 700


 800

 900


 1,000

 -

 1,000



 2,000

 3,000


 4,000

U

S$/



kg 

of

  r



ef

ined 


indi

um

 m



et

al

 



pr

oduc


ed

 

 (2011 



U

S$)


 

Annual production  

(tonnes of indium metal per annum) 

Medium-term indium supply curves (2016) 

primary supply

total supply (primary + secondary)

total supply (base case + recovery efficiencies)






Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   ...   40


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə