The Availability of Indium: The Present, Medium Term, and Long Term



Yüklə 1,06 Mb.

səhifə3/40
tarix06.03.2018
ölçüsü1,06 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   40

vi 

This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

  Combining primary (770 tonnes) and secondary (610 tonnes) supplies, we estimate that 



total global refined indium supply was 1,380 tonnes in 2013, 40% of which occurred in 

China. 


  As for production costs, this analysis indicates that producers require a minimum indium 

price of $100/kg (in 2011 U.S. dollar terms) to produce indium. Below this price, even 

the highest grade deposits cannot economically recover indium. At prices of ~$150–

$300/kg of refined metal, most producers cover their variable costs of production, which 

are necessary to induce supply in the short run. At prices higher than $350/kg, indium 

supply is highly inflexible because of short-run capacity constraints. 

For the medium term (5–20 years into the future), incremental or increased indium production 

conceivably could come from five sources:  

1.  New byproduct production 

2.  Increased recovery efficiencies at primary operations 

3.  Increased secondary production from recycling of manufacturing wastes 

4.  Increased secondary production from recycling of EOL products 

5.  New mines that produce indium as a main product or coproduct (i.e., not as a byproduct).  

The quantitative analysis in this study is limited to all but the fourth category; that is, it focuses 

on new and expanded mines (and associated processing facilities) and improved recovery 

efficiencies in both primary production and the recycling of manufacturing wastes. We do not 

analyze the potential for production from EOL recycling from PV modules because the medium 

term covers the next 5–20 years and solar modules have a useful life of 25–30 years. The 

quantities of indium available are also constrained by known developed and undeveloped 

resources (in the ground), as well as the stock of material in existing products. 

Medium-term availability of indium has the following characteristics: 

  Based solely on expanded and new mines that produce indium as a byproduct or 



coproduct (mainly along with zinc), primary indium production nearly doubles, from 770 

tonnes in 2013 to 1,365 tonnes in 2031. 

  Recovery of indium from zinc ores is inefficient, and improvements in recovery 



efficiencies represent the largest medium-term source of new supply. Typically, less than 

20% of the indium in ore is recovered. When including the possibility for greater 

recovery throughout the supply chain, primary production could increase to 5,560 tonnes 

by 2031, highlighting the significant impact that advancements in technology could have 

on supply. 

  The relevant production costs to consider in the medium term are variable (or operating) 



costs and capital costs, because investments are needed to make medium-term supplies 

available. Therefore, prices need to cover operating and capital costs to justify investment 

and operations. The analysis here suggests that prices need to be at least $350–375/kg to 

induce significant medium-term supply. At prices of $400–$450/kg, most of the tonnage 

noted in the previous bulleted point would come to market. As such, ~$400/kg can be 



vii 

This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

thought of as a medium-term price floor for indium; stated slightly differently, prices 

lower than $400/kg could be justified only if there were a near complete substitution 

away from the material. (At any specific time in the medium term, market conditions 

could force prices to drop below $400/kg, but such low levels are likely to be temporary; 

at these prices, primary and secondary suppliers are unlikely to continue investing to 

maintain productive capacity.) 

  Although not explicitly modeled as part of this exercise, secondary supply from 



consumer waste (EOL products) could become a source of supply in the medium term. It 

is difficult to estimate the cost of such supply, but given that current price levels have not 

justified the recovery of indium from laptops, cellular phones, and other electronic 

devices (mostly because they are so widely dispersed), prices would likely need to exceed 

$700/kg to make recovery from these sources profitable. Furthermore, although a less 

dispersed (and possibly more profitable) source of scrap could be found in EOL solar 

panels, we do not expect this to contribute significantly to supply until the 2030s. Given 

the average expected life of solar panels of some 20 years and the relatively recent 

installation of most panels, significant quantities of indium-bearing solar panels would 

not become sources of secondary supply until the 2030s. 

Finally, for the long term (in the 2030s and beyond), indium availability is constrained mostly by 

our level of knowledge about the Earth’s crust and our technological capabilities. We are not in 

danger of “running out” of indium, considering the scale of its potential demand relative to its 

estimated amount in the crust. Rather, the critical issues relate to production costs. As a starting 

point, using a methodology developed by Green (2009), we estimate that the central tendency for 

long-term prices to be ~$600/kg; $100–$3,300/kg would cover 80% of possible outcomes (all in 

2011 U.S. dollars). 



viii 

This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 



Table of Contents 

1

 

Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 1

 

2

 

Demand .................................................................................................................................................. 3

 

3

 

Supply: A Snapshot of the Present .................................................................................................... 5

 

3.1  Introduction ...................................................................................................................................... 5 



3.2  Deposits and Reserves ..................................................................................................................... 6 

3.3  Mine Production .............................................................................................................................. 9 

3.4  Smelting and Refining ................................................................................................................... 11 

3.5  Processing of Indium-Bearing Ores and Recovery of Indium ....................................................... 17 

3.5.1  Comminution .................................................................................................................... 18 

3.5.2  Beneficiation ..................................................................................................................... 18 

3.5.3  Smelting ............................................................................................................................ 19 

3.5.4  Refining ............................................................................................................................ 19 

3.5.5  Costs of Refining .............................................................................................................. 21 

3.5.6  Overall Recovery Efficiency ............................................................................................. 21 

3.6  Summary of Primary Production ................................................................................................... 23 

3.7  Secondary Production .................................................................................................................... 25 

3.7.1  Recycling Process ............................................................................................................. 28 

3.7.2  Estimates of Secondary Supply ........................................................................................ 28 

3.7.3  Recycling From End-of-Life Products .............................................................................. 30 

3.8  Total Primary and Secondary Production ...................................................................................... 31 



4

 

Supply: the Medium-Term Outlook (5–20 years) ............................................................................. 34

 

4.1  Expansion of Zinc (or Other Main Product) Production ................................................................ 35 



4.1.1  Mount Pleasant (North Zone), Canada ............................................................................. 37 

4.1.2  Malku Khota, Bolivia ....................................................................................................... 37 

4.1.3  Pinguino, Argentina .......................................................................................................... 39 

4.1.4  Pirquitas, Argentina .......................................................................................................... 40 

4.1.5  La Oroya, Peru .................................................................................................................. 41 

4.1.6  South Crofty, England ...................................................................................................... 41 

4.2  Increased Recovery at Existing Facilities ...................................................................................... 42 

4.3  Summary Expansion of Primary Supply ........................................................................................ 44 

4.4  Expansion of Secondary Supply .................................................................................................... 47 

4.5  Summary of Medium-Term Supply ............................................................................................... 48 



5

 

Supply: The Long Term (Beyond 20 Years) ..................................................................................... 51

 

References ................................................................................................................................................. 55

 

Appendix A: Zinc, Copper, and Tin Reserves and Production Estimates .......................................... 61

 

Appendix B: Secondary Production ....................................................................................................... 65

 

Appendix C. Metal Prices ......................................................................................................................... 66

 

Appendix D: Methodology Used To Derive the Short- and Medium-Term Supply Curves ............... 67

 

Appendix E: Earth Abundance of Various Elements ............................................................................ 79

 





Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   40


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə