The Availability of Indium: The Present, Medium Term, and Long Term



Yüklə 1,06 Mb.

səhifə36/40
tarix06.03.2018
ölçüsü1,06 Mb.
1   ...   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40

 

67 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

Appendix D: Methodology Used To Derive the Short- 

and Medium-Term Supply Curves 

Primary indium production is largely the result of byproduct production from sphalerite (zinc) 

ores. As such, it is not significant to most indium-producing mining companies, and the value 

chain from mining to refined metal often involves several companies with few companies 

spanning the entire value chain. Furthermore, with total global primary production valued at 

approximately $493million,

41

 indium recovery is likely not of key economic importance for 



many smelters or special metal refineries. As a result, data surrounding the explicit incremental 

costs to recover indium are not publically available and, because costs are intermingled between 

main product, coproduct, and byproduct metals, miners and smelters probably do not explicitly 

track the costs of indium internally.  

As is often the case with mineral properties,  technical reports filed by midsized and junior 

mining companies with the securities exchanges as part of their disclosure requirements contain 

the best and most detailed information available.

42

 This information can then be used together 



with various resource characteristics, recovery efficiencies, costs of capital, etc. to generate a 

representative view of costs and production levels for various deposits. We adopt this approach 

when examining what a supply curve for indium might currently look like and how this might 

change going forward. We use a Monte Carlo simulation to generate short- and medium-term 

supplies. As will subsequently be discussed in greater detail, we use data from the following 

sources to build the supply curves: 

  A recent preliminary economic assessment of the Mount Pleasant indium-zinc-tin deposit 



in Canada (Thibault et al. 2010)  

  A catalogue of known indium-bearing deposits (Schwarz-Schampera and Herzig 2002)  



  Historical (long run) commodity prices for tin and zinc 

  Growth of main product zinc production and therefore extrapolated byproduct indium 



production 

  Estimates of medium-term potential recovery efficiencies at new facilities (Thibault  



et al. 2010). 

The steps taken to generate the results differ slightly between generating the short- and medium-

term supply curves. In the short term, the indium need only cover its share of direct operating 

costs; in the medium to long term, the indium needs to cover operating and capital costs and 

generate a fair return to capital. We now look at each of these approaches in detail. 

The Short Term 

Focusing first on the short run, the operating cost estimate for the Mount Pleasant deposit is 

examined in detail (Thibault et al. 2010). The preliminary assessment for Mount Pleasant 

                                                 

41

 Assuming 822 tpa of indium metal × 1000 kg/tonne × $600/kg indium metal. 



42

 Large mining companies are often not required to disclose detailed technical information about development projects or 

ongoing operations, because the performance of a single operation is not essential to the overall value of the company. 



 

68 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

contains three production cases labeled “A,” “B,” and “C,” all of which assume that same mine 

and plant head feed capacity but vary the degree to which the zinc, tin, and indium are refined.  

In case “A” the design accommodates the recovery of a tin concentrate as well as a combined 

indium and zinc concentrate. These concentrates are then shipped to third-party smelters for 

further processing. Case “B” includes the concentrator plant from case “A” to recover a tin 

concentrate that is shipped to third-party smelters; however, the treatment plant is expanded and 

includes a hydrometallurgical plant for production of indium sponge of 95% purity and zinc 

metal. Indium sponge is then pressed into briquettes and shipped to a third-party refinery for 

upgrading to 4N8 purity. The zinc metal is sold directly to the market. Case “C” includes the 

concentrator/hydrometallurgical plant of Case “B” indium sponge and zinc metal in addition to a 

pyrometallurgical plant for production of tin chloride instead of tin concentrate. Various design 

parameters for the three cases and their respective final products are summarized in Table 26. 

Table 26. Mount Pleasant Production and Product Revenue 

Summary for Production Cases “A” Through “C” 

Parameter 

Units 

Tin Conc.

a

 

Tin 

Chloride 

Zinc and 

Indium 

Conc.

a

 

Zinc 

Metal 

Indium 

Sponge 

Annual production rate  DMT

a

/yr  3231 



2142 

8,658 


4056 

40.5 


Product grade 

wt% 


46.0 wt%, 

Tin 


99%, Tin 

Chloride 

50% Zinc, 

0.49% Indium  99.50% 

95% Indium 

Market price 

C$

b

/kg 



$16.25/kg 

Tin 


$15.23/k

g 99% 


Tin 

Chloride 

$2.70/kg Zinc, 

$639.67/kg 

Indium 

$2.70/kg 



Zinc 

$639.67/kg 

Indium (4N) 

Market price 

adjustment 

C$/kg 


n/a 

n/a 


n/a 

n/a 


81.38%

c

 



Total treatment 

charges 


C$/DMT  $783.37 

$0 


$390.60 

$0 


$66,000

d

 



Total unit deductions 

wt% 


3.70% Tin 

0% 


8.00% (Zinc) 

0% 


0% 

Annual revenue 

C$mn/yr  $20 

$33 


$11 

$11 


$17 

Revenue relative to 

100% market 

81.50% 



100% 

54.3% (Zinc) 

15% (Indium) 

100% 


71.10% 

Mill characteristics 

 

850 tpd design capacity, 90% availability, 279,226 tpa 



Applicable to case A 

 





Applicable to case B 

 







Applicable to case C 

 





a

 DMT = dry metric tonnes; "conc." = concentrate. 



C$ refers to Canadian dollars. The conversion used by Thibault et al. (2010) at the time of drafting their report was C$1.10/US$. 

c

 Market price adjustment factor accounts for loss of indium in refining process to 4N8 grade and a price discount for indium sponge relative to the 



price for 4N indium. 

d

 Indium sponge treatment charges are per tonne of 4N* indium metal recovered after refining losses. 



Source: based on Thibault et al. 2010 

 

To assess the cost of producing indium, we concern ourselves with cases “A” and “B” only, 



because the upgrading of tin concentrate to tin chloride is not of interest. In the case of the 

Mount Pleasant property, 40.5 tpa of indium may be produced as a coproduct along with zinc 






Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə