The Availability of Indium: The Present, Medium Term, and Long Term



Yüklə 1,06 Mb.

səhifə37/40
tarix06.03.2018
ölçüsü1,06 Mb.
1   ...   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40

 

69 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

and tin. Indium’s contribution is important in determining the feasibility of the project; thus, we 

allocate certain costs equally across all three coproducts. Therefore, as we progress through 

allocating costs from the Mount Pleasant deposit, costs that are generally considered to be 

necessary for the production of all coproducts or are fixed overheads are distributed equally 

among all metals, while other costs that are directly related to the production of one of the metals 

(such as marketing, packaging, or special refining) are allocated directly to that metal.  

The overall summary effect of this cost allocation is shown in Table 27, where total costs are 

shown in terms of a Canadian dollar (C$) per tonne processed and C$ per tonne of metal or 

concentrate produced. Mining costs totaling C$30.03/tonne are shared equally among the metals. 

Under case “B,” processing costs are borne disproportionately by zinc and indium metals. This is 

because in case “B,” these metals are processed to a higher purity than the tin that is produced in 

concentrate form. Site administration costs are borne principally by the indium metal, and to a 

lesser degree, by zinc and tin, mainly because incremental differences are associated with going 

from case “A” to case “B.” Similarly, capital costs

43

 are borne disproportionately by zinc and 



indium because the treatment plant requires increased capital to improve the refined purity of 

these metals. 



Table 27. Summary of Cost Allocation Between Metals at Adex Mining’s Mount Pleasant Project 

Summary 

Mount Pleasant – Adex Mining: Total Operating Cost Allocation Between Metals 

 

 

Total Cost (A) 

 

Total Cost (B) 

Cost per tonne by 

activity 

units 


Tin 

Zinc 


Indium 

  Tin 


Zinc 

Indium 


Mining and Concentration Cost 

Mine operating cost  C$/t 

processed 

10.01 


10.01 

10.01 


  10.01 

10.01 


10.01 

Process operating 

cost 

C$/t 


processed 

10.18 


10.70 

10.86 


  9.18 

16.93 


22.78 

Site administration 

operating cost 

C$/t 


processed 

0.58 


0.61 

0.62 


  0.58 

0.85 


1.84 

Capital cost 

allocation 

C$/t 


processed 

6.52 


6.52 

6.52 


  6.52 

13.63 


13.63 

Subtotal (mining 

and concentration) 

C$/t 


processed 

27.29 


27.83 

28.00 


  26.28 

41.42 


48.26 

% allocation 

  

33% 


33% 

34% 


  23% 

36% 


42% 

Mining and Concentration Cost 

Mine operating cost  C$/kg

a

 

n/a 



n/a 

n/a 


  0.86 

0.69 


72.57 

Process operating 

cost 

C$/kg


a

  

n/a 



n/a 

n/a 


  0.79 

1.17 


165.19 

Site administration 

operating cost 

C$/kg


a

 

n/a 



n/a 

n/a 


  0.05 

0.06 


13.35 

Capital cost 

allocation 

C$/kg


 

n/a 



n/a 

n/a 


  0.56 

0.94 


98.88 

Subtotal (mining 

C$/kg

a

 



0.00 


0.00 

  2.27 


2.85 

350.00 


                                                 

43

 To convert capital costs to an annualized operating cost, the lump sum capital is treated as an annuity over the life of the Mount 



Pleasant property--12 years. We adopt the real interest rate of 12% used by Thibault et al. 2010 in their preliminary economic 

assessment of the Mount Pleasant property. 




 

70 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

and concentration) 



Refining Cost 

Additional 

smelting/refining 

charges 


C$/kg

a

 



0.78 

0.39 


0.39 

  0.78 


0.00 

66.00 


Subtotal processing 

stage 


C$/kg

a

 



0.78 

0.39 


0.39 

  0.78 


0.00 

66.00 


Total production 

cost 


C$/kg

n/a 



n/a 

n/a 


  3.06 

2.85 


416.00 

Total production 

cost

b

 



US$/kg

a

 



n/a 

n/a 


n/a 

  2.78 


2.59 

378.18 


 

a

 Case A: Tin Concentrate, Zinc/Indium Concentrate. Case B: Tin Concentrate, Zinc Metal, Indium Sponge 



Costs in $/kg of refined metal or concentrate corresponding to the particular scenario. 

Exchange rate of C$1.10/U.S.$ used in accordance with Thibault et al. (2010). 



Source: Thibault et al. (2010) 

 

On the basis of this cost allocation we see that approximately 42% of the total costs are borne by 



indium, while the remaining 58% are shared by zinc and tin. Converting the costs from a $/tonne 

figure to $/kg of metal produced, we see that total on-mine costs for indium amount to C$350/kg. 

Because the mine plans to produce an indium sponge of only 95% purity, additional refining 

charges of $66/kg are require to upgrade the indium to commercial qualities of 99.998% (4N8), 

bringing the total cost to C$416.00/kg of 4N8 indium. Converting this cost to U.S. dollars at a 

rate of C$1.10/U.S.$ in accordance with the exchange rate used to compile the cost estimates 

(Thibault et al. 2010), Mount Pleasant is likely to produce 40.5 tpa of indium at a total unit cost 

of $378/kg of 4N8 metal. Once capital is sunk, the deposit would likely continue to produce 

indium provided that price did not dip below U.S. $288/kg. 

The estimates for Mount Pleasant are preliminary and according to the authors of that study, 

have an accuracy level of –10%, +35%. (i.e., the costs could be underestimated by 35% or 

overestimated by 10%). Furthermore, costs in the model are driven by key assumptions about: 

  Grades and recoveries of indium. Aside from determining the amount of indium metal 



recovered, these determine the ultimate contribution of indium and whether it should be 

treated as a byproduct, coproduct, or main product mineral. 

  The percentage of costs that indium should bear depending on whether it’s treated 



as a byproduct, coproduct, or main product. There is an element of subjectivity to this 

assessment. 

  Life of mine and discount rate. Together these determine the capital cost allocated to 



each year’s production.  

By varying these input deposits, the Mount Pleasant cost model can be used to simulate global 

indium production. To ensure the validity of the simulation, we use the following inputs: (1) a 

representative distribution of indium concentrations at known deposits compiled by Schwarz-

Schampera and Herzig (2002); (2) ranges of indium recovery at typical at each stage in the 

recovery process; (3) known ranges for the cost of capital for companies in the extractive 

industries; (4) typical ranges for the life of many mining operations; and (5) the cost estimate 





Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə