The Availability of Indium: The Present, Medium Term, and Long Term



Yüklə 1,06 Mb.

səhifə39/40
tarix06.03.2018
ölçüsü1,06 Mb.
1   ...   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40

 

73 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

increases to 3,348 tpa to 2,710 tpa with a midpoint of 2,976 tpa. This corresponds with an overall 

recovery rate of 64%–73%. 

Table 29. Short-Term Indium Supply Scenarios 

Short-Term Indium Recovery Scenarios 

  

Recovery at Each Stage 



(tonnes) 

Corresponding Recovery 

Efficiency (%)

A,C

 

  

Low 



Mid 

High 

Low 

Mid 

High 

Indium contained in mined zinc ores 

100 

100.0 


100 

 

 



 

Indium reporting to concentrate 

50.0 

60.0 


70.0 

50% 


60% 

70% 


Indium sent to indium-capable smelter 

35.0 


42.0 

49.0 


70% 

70% 


70% 

Indium recovered by smelter 

17.5 

21.0 


24.5 

50% 


50% 

50% 


Indium recovered by special metal 

refinery 

14.0 

16.8 


19.6 

80% 


80% 

80% 


Estimates of indium metal recovered 

731 


731 

731 


 

 

 



Overall indium recovery rate 

14% 


17% 

20% 


 

 

 



Equivalent amount of indium 'mined' 

5,221 


4,351 

3,730 


 

 

 



Scenario 1: If All Indium Concentrates Make Their Way to Indium-Capable Smelters 

Indium contained in mined zinc ores 

5,221 

4,351 


3,730 

 

 



 

Indium reporting to concentrate 

2,611 

2,611 


2,611 

50% 


60% 

70% 


Indium sent to indium-capable smelter 

2,611 


2,611 

2,611 


100% 

100% 


100% 

Indium recovered by smelter 

1,305 

1,305 


1,305 

50% 


50% 

50% 


Indium recovered by special metal 

refinery 

1,044 

1,044 


1,044 

80% 


80% 

80% 


Estimates of indium metal recovered 

1,044 


1,044 

1,044 


 

 

 



Overall indium recovery rate 

20% 


24% 

28% 


 

 

 



Scenario 2: Scenario 1 + Improved Recovery Efficiencies

b

 

Indium contained in mined zinc ores 

5,221 

4,351 


3,730 

 

 



 

Indium reporting to concentrate 

3,916 

3,481 


3,170 

75% 


80% 

85% 


Indium sent to indium-capable smelter 

3,916 


3,481 

3,170 


100% 

100% 


100% 

Indium recovered by smelter 

3,524 

3,133 


2,853 

90% 


90% 

90% 


Indium recovered by special metal 

refinery 

3,348 

2,976 


2,710 

95% 


95% 

95% 


Estimates of indium metal recovered 

3,348 


2,976 

2,710 


 

 

 



Overall indium recovery rate 

64% 


68% 

73% 


 

 

 



 

a

 The quantity of mined indium is the value with the highest uncertainty in our analysis. As a result, we back 



calculate mined indium from refined indium and a range of overall recovery efficiencies. From these starting points 

for mined indium, we then proceed to vary recovery rates to calculate the potential amount of metal recovered. 

Highlighted cells in light green show values that have changed from the base case. 



Target recovery efficiencies are based on current technologies and have been taken from feasibility studies. 

 

Using the midpoint data from Scenarios 1 and 2 in Table 29, we can now see how short-term 



initiatives might affect the availability of primary indium and the cost at which that supply might 

be available. The supply curves depicted in Figure 30 include the status quo scenario from Figure 

29 as well as Scenarios 1 and 2. The cost allocations in the simulation remain unaltered per 



 

74 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

individual simulation realizations;

44

only the quantity produced is scaled to match the increased 



average recovery coinciding with Scenarios 1 and 2, respectively.  

 

Figure 29. Short-term primary indium supply, including pipeline efficiency improvements 



 

The Medium Term 

We use a similar approach to generate the medium-term supply curves but have made certain 

adjustments: 

  Capital costs are included. Because operators have the option to invest in new capacity 



or shut down in the medium term, we adjust costs to reflect returns to capital and 

eliminate all realizations in the simulation that would not generate positive returns for 

investors.  

  Variations in the long-term main-product average prices are used to assess 



feasibility. Readers should examine the long-term historical prices of tin and zinc in 

Appendix C. 

Primary indium is, to our knowledge, currently produced only as a byproduct from zinc, and to a 

lesser degree tin and copper ores; thus, we may reasonably assume that the growth of indium 

production will follow anticipated changes to main product supply. For this analysis, we concern 

ourselves only with the growth of zinc production and assume that the ratio of total indium 

production to total zinc production is constant over time. Taking two medium-term snapshots, 

one in 2016 and the other at 2031, and assuming a possible range of main product growth of 2%–

3%, total indium production in 2016 and 2031 is forecasted to be 827 tonnes and 1,365 tonnes, 

respectively (see Table 31). 

                                                 

44

 By increasing the recovery efficiency one would anticipate that indium increases in significance to a particular simulation 



realization. If the model were rerun, assuming that recoveries of other main product metals remained unchanged, indium could 

move from byproduct to coproduct and then costs would be reallocated on the appropriate basis. This level of detail has not been 

considered for the short run and the curves above should be considered a first pass at how quantities of indium and costs might 

react to changing recovery efficiencies. 






Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə