The Availability of Indium: The Present, Medium Term, and Long Term



Yüklə 1,06 Mb.

səhifə40/40
tarix06.03.2018
ölçüsü1,06 Mb.
1   ...   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40

 

75 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

Table 30. Monte Carlo Simulation Input Distributions for Metal Prices 

Name 

Graph 

Min 

Mean 

Max 

Std 

Dev 

5% 

50% 

95% 

p95-

p5 

Tin price 

(US$/kg) 

 

 



3.56 

8.55 


18.52 

3.527 


3.94 

7.95 


15.18 

11.24 


Zinc price 

(US$/kg) 

 

0.57 


0.97 

+∞ 


0.610 

0.65 


0.86 

1.59 


0.94 

Data for the distributions consist of 52 observations of average annual metal prices between 1960 and 2011 (World Bank 2012). 

The data were fitted in @Risk computer software and selection of the distribution type was based on examining the Chi-Sq 

distribution ranking for the corresponding data.  

Recoveries reflect latest commercially available technologies when making assumptions regarding recovery efficiency. 

 

 

Table 31. Main Product Growth and Associated Forecasted Byproduct Indium Production 



Medium-Term Primary Indium Refinery Production 

Main Product Growth* 

CAGR, % 

  

2011 

2016 

2031 

2.0% 


 

731  


807 

1,199 


3.0% 

 

731 



847 

1,531 


Average 

  

731 

827 

1,365 

 

 



 

 

 



* Main product CAGR range based on historical zinc production growth between 2007 and 2011 as calculated from USGS 

data and estimates for 2012 growth from Willis et al. (2012). 

 

These projected byproduct indium levels, as well as the assumptions listed above, form the basis 



for a series of medium-term supply scenarios. Briefly, these are: 

  Base case 2016. This scenario uses the current levels of indium recovery efficiency and 



its associated current production (731 tonnes) and forecasts main product expansion and 

associated indium expansion until 2016. 

  Base case 2031. This scenario uses current levels of indium recovery efficiency and its 



associated current production (731 tonnes) and forecasts main product expansion until 

2031.  


  Scenario 1: Base case + improved recovery and pipeline efficiency (2016). This 

scenario uses the base case 2016 levels but builds in improved overall pipeline efficiency 

described in short-term Scenarios 1 and 2. However, because we are now considering the 

medium term, capital costs associated with these efficiency improvements are reflected in 

the cost of indium. 

  Scenario 1: Base case + improved recovery and pipeline efficiency (2031). Same as 



the scenario in the third bullet, except byproduct indium production has been forecast to 

2031. 

Figure 31 contains the supply curves for the first two scenarios. Compared with Figure 30, the 

cost curves have shifted upward because capital costs are now included. In the medium term the 




 

76 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

elasticity of primary indium supply appears high ($350–$450/kg) and inelastic at prices higher 

than $800 and lower than ~$275.  

 

Figure 30. Medium-term base case primary indium supply projected to 2016 and 2031 

The base case scenarios are self-explanatory, but the derivation of figures for the other two 

scenarios that examine improved recovery efficiency require more explanation. As discussed in 

the short-term supply curves, recovery inefficiency has two principal causes: (1) indium-bearing 

concentrates not being sent to indium-capable smelters; and (2) metallurgical losses through the 

recovery process, due possibly to less efficient technologies being used at existing plants, 

smelters, and refineries. In deriving the medium-term supply curves, we assume that 100% of 

indium-bearing concentrates are sent to indium-capable smelters, which increases 2016 indium 

primary production from 827 tonnes to 1,182 tonnes and 2031 primary production from 1,365 

tonnes to 1,950 tonnes. These calculations are detailed in Table 32. 

 

Table 32. Medium-Term Indium Supply Scenarios 

  

  

Recovery Efficiency 



(tonnes) 

Recovery Efficiency 

(%) 

  

  



Low 

Mid 

High 

Low 

Mid 

High 

Indium contained in mined zinc ores 

 

100 


100.0 

100 


 

 

 



Indium reporting to concentrate 

 

75.0 



80.0 

85.0 


75% 

80% 


85% 

Indium sent to indium-capable smelter 

 

52.5 


56.0 

59.5 


70% 

70% 


70% 

Indium recovered by smelter 

 

47.3 


50.4 

53.6 


90% 

90% 


90% 

Indium recovered by special metal refinery 

 

44.9 


47.9 

50.9 


95% 

95% 


95% 

Overall indium recovery rate 

  

45% 


48% 

51% 


 

 

 



2016 

Estimates of indium metal recovered 

 

827 


827 

827 


 

 

 



Equivalent amount of indium “mined” 

 

5,909 



4,924 

4,221 


 

 

 



2031 

Estimates of indium metal recovered (2031) 

 

1,365 


1,365 

1,365 


 

 

 



Equivalent amount of indium “mined” 

 

9,749 



8,125 

6,964 


 

 

 



 -

 100


 200

 300


 400

 500


 600

 700


 800

 900


 1,000

 -

 200



 400

 600


 800

 1,000


 1,200

 1,400


 1,600

U

S$/



kg 

of

  r



ef

ined 


indi

um

 m



et

al

 pr



oduc

ed

 



 (2011 

U

S$)



 

Annual production  

(tonnes of primary indium metal per annum) 

Medium-term primary indium supply curves 

base case 2016

base case 2031



 

77 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

Scenario 1: Improved Recoveries + All in Concentrates 

Make Their Way to Indium-Capable Smelters (2016) 

Indium contained in mined zinc ores 

 

5,909 


4,924 

4,221 


 

 

 



Indium reporting to concentrate 

 

4,432 



3,939 

3,588 


75% 

80% 


85% 

Indium sent to indium-capable smelter 

 

4,432 


3,939 

3,588 


100% 

100% 


100% 

Indium recovered by smelter 

 

3,989 


3,545 

3,229 


90% 

90% 


90% 

Indium recovered by special metal refinery 

 

3,789 


3,368 

3,067 


95% 

95% 


95% 

Estimates of indium metal recovered 

   3,789 

3,368 


3,067 

 

 



 

Overall indium recovery rate 

  

64% 


68% 

73% 


 

 

 



Scenario 1: Improved Recoveries + All in Concentrates 

Make Their Way to Indium-Capable Smelters (2031) 

Indium contained in mined zinc ores 

 

9,749 


8,125 

6,964 


 

 

 



Indium reporting to concentrate 

 

7,312 



6,500 

5,919 


75% 

80% 


85% 

Indium sent to indium-capable smelter 

 

7,312 


6,500 

5,919 


100% 

100% 


100% 

Indium recovered by smelter 

 

6,581 


5,850 

5,327 


90% 

90% 


90% 

Indium recovered by special metal refinery 

 

6,252 


5,557 

5,061 


95% 

95% 


95% 

Estimates of indium metal recovered 

   6,252 

5,557 


5,061 

 

 



 

Overall indium recovery rate 

  

64% 


68% 

73% 


 

 

 



 

We back-calculate mined indium from refined indium and a range of overall recovery efficiencies. From these starting points for 

mined indium, we then vary the percentage of indium concentrates sent to indium-capable smelters to calculate the potential 

quantity of indium metal recovered. 

Highlighted cells in light green show values that have changed from the base cases. 

Target recovery efficiencies are based on current technologies and have been taken from feasibility studies.

 

 

Examining potential indium supply where pipeline efficiencies are gained yields the primary 



indium supply curves depicted in Figure 32 and Figure 33 for 2016 and 2031, respectively. Costs 

are kept in 2011 U.S. dollar terms to facilitate comparison across time, though one would expect 

costs to rise in nominal terms between 2016 and 2031. 

 

 



Figure 31. Medium-term primary indium supply (2016) 

 

 -



 100

 200


 300

 400


 500

 600


 700

 800


 900

 1,000


 -

 500


 1,000

 1,500


 2,000

 2,500


 3,000

 3,500


 4,000

U

S



$/

kg 


of

  r


ef

ined 


indi

um

 m



et

al

 pr



oduc

ed

 



 (2011 U

S

$)



 

Annual production  

(tonnes of primary indium metal per annum) 

Medium-term primary indium supply curves (2016) 

base case 2016

Scenario 1: Base case + efficiency improvement



 

78 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

 

Figure 32. Medium-term primary indium supply (2031) 



 

In all these scenarios, we have included supply anticipated to come from known indium projects 

identified in Section 4.1, namely: Mount Pleasant, Malku Khota, Pirquitas, Pinquito, and South 

Crofty. The La Oroya complex is not included because, as a metallurgical and refinery complex, 

we are hesitant to treat La Oroya as “new production” and believe that it may simply reflect a 

shift of production.. These are explicitly depicted in Figure 34 to give the reader an idea of where 

these deposits might feature competitively and what fraction of primary indium they might 

contribute in 2016. 

 

Figure 33. Medium-term primary indium supply (2016), including positioning of 

known potential future sources of supply 

The costs and quantities for these deposits were determined with a bottom-up approach using 

publically available information. A similar approach was to determine the allocation of costs 

between indium and other metals at Adex’s Mount Pleasant deposit.  

 

 -

 100



 200

 300


 400

 500


 600

 700


 800

 900


 1,000

 -

 1,000



 2,000

 3,000


 4,000

 5,000


 6,000

U

S



$/

kg of


  r

ef

ined i



ndi

um

 m



et

al

 



pr

oduc


ed

 

 (2011 U



S

$)

 



Annual production  

(tonnes of primary indium metal per annum) 

Medium-term primary indium supply curves (2031) 

base case 2031

-

100 


200 

300 


400 

500 


600 

700 


800 

900 


1,000 

-

100 



200 

300 


400 

500 


600 

700 


800 

900 


U

S$

/k



g o

f  4


N

 in


di

um

 m



et

al

 p



ro

du

ce



d

(2

01



1 U

S$

)



Cumulative annual production 

(tonnes of primary indium metal per annum)

Medium term primary indium supply  (2016)

medium term ~2016

M

t P


le

as

an



t

M

alk



u

K

hot



a

Pir


qu

ita


s

Sout


h C

ro

fty



Pi

ngui


no


 

79 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

Appendix E: Earth Abundance of Various Elements 

 

A



bu

nd

an

ce 

(at

om



of

 el

em

en

t p

er

 10

6

 a

to

m



of 

Si

 

`

 



 

Atomic Number, Z 

Notes: 


Abundance (atom fraction) of the chemical elements in Earth's upper continental crust as a function of atomic number. The 

rarest elements in the crust (shown in yellow) are not the heaviest, but are rather the siderophile (iron-loving) elements in the 

Goldschmidt classification of elements. These have been depleted by being relocated deeper into the Earth’s core. Their 

abundance in meteoroids is higher. Additionally, tellurium and selenium have been depleted from the crust due to formation 

of volatile hydrides. 

Source: Haxel et al. 2002 



Figure 34. Abundance of elements in the Earth’s upper continental crust 

as a function of atomic number 

Document Outline

  • Acronyms and Abbreviations
  • Executive Summary
  • Table of Contents
  • List of Figures
  • List of Tables
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Demand
  • 3 Supply: A Snapshot of the Present 
    • 3.1 Introduction
    • 3.2 Deposits and Reserves
    • 3.3 Mine Production
    • 3.4 Smelting and Refining
    • 3.5 Processing of Indium-Bearing Ores and Recovery of Indium
    • 3.6 Summary of Primary Production
    • 3.7 Secondary Production
    • 3.8 Total Primary and Secondary Production
  • 4 Supply: the Medium-Term Outlook (5–20 years)
    • 4.1 Expansion of Zinc (or Other Main Product) Production
    • 4.2 Increased Recovery at Existing Facilities
    • 4.3 Summary Expansion of Primary Supply
    • 4.4 Expansion of Secondary Supply
    • 4.5 Summary of Medium-Term Supply
  • 5 Supply: The Long Term (Beyond 20 Years)
  • References
  • Appendix A: Zinc, Copper, and Tin Reserves and Production Estimates
  • Appendix B: Secondary Production
  • Appendix C. Metal Prices
  • Appendix D: Methodology Used To Derive the Short- and Medium-Term Supply Curves
  • Appendix E: Earth Abundance of Various Elements



Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə