The Availability of Indium: The Present, Medium Term, and Long Term



Yüklə 1,06 Mb.

səhifə8/40
tarix06.03.2018
ölçüsü1,06 Mb.
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   40

 

This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 



 

Figure 4. Distribution of world indium, gallium, and tellurium resources and production 


 

This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 



In comparison with the figures presented in Table 1, Indium Corp. states that total reserves and 

resources

9

 in 2009 were ~50,000 tonnes, distributed about evenly between Western countries 



(26,000 tonnes, 53%) and China, and the Commonwealth of Independent States (23,000 tonnes, 

47%) (Moss et al. 2011). 

Given that current refined production is ~770 tpa (as discussed later in this report), the ratio of 

reserves to annual production is ~20, implying that these reserves would last ~20 years at current 

production rates. For many minerals, a reserve/production ratio of 10–20 is not uncommon, so 

indium’s ratio is not unusual. One should not infer from this ratio that geologic sources of 

indium will be depleted in 2 decades. Reserves change over time. As mining depletes reserves, 

mining companies have an incentive to find and develop additional reserves—a process that 

results in reserve/production ratios that remain reasonably constant over time. For example, the 

USGS estimate of indium reserves at year-end 1997 was 2,600 tonnes, yielding a 1997 

reserve/production ratio of 11. Indium reserves at year-end 2013 were approximately six times 

larger than they were in 1997. 

These are crude estimates of reserves; however, they provide a sense of where mining of indium-

bearing ores is likely to be concentrated over the next several decades. Although most reserves 

and resources are in China, there is a significant diversity of other potential locations for mining 

indium-bearing ores. Also, the estimates of resources and reserves focus on primary sources of 

indium only; if one considers future increases in the recycling of consumer and manufacturing 

waste, the geographic dispersion of indium sources could diversify significantly. 



3.3  Mine Production 

Mine production figures are not publically available for indium as a byproduct of zinc mining 

and processing, but Roskill (2010) estimates global mine production of indium from zinc mine 

production statistics for 2009.  

Table 2 shows the Roskill estimates for mine production of indium as well as our estimates for 

2013. In arriving at these estimates, Roskill assumed that sphalerite ores contain 67% zinc and 

15–50 ppm indium. 

The indium content of zinc ores mined in 2009 and 2013 is ~481 and 629 tonnes, respectively. 

Growth of indium production between 2009 and 2013 represents a compounded annual growth 

rate (CAGR) of 6.9%. By comparison, zinc production grew at a CAGR of 4.8% over the same 

period (Appendix A), indicating that the production of indium-bearing zinc ores grew faster than 

non-indium-bearing ores.  

The country concentration of mine production is similar to that of the concentration of reserves. 

The main sources of zinc ores are China, Peru, Canada, Australia, and the United States. These 

five countries accounted for 76% of the potentially recoverable indium from zinc ores in 2009 

and 79% in 2013. These same countries represented ~82% and ~75% of indium reserves in 2007 

                                                 

9

 Although reserves (classified as “proven” and “probable” by most reporting codes) are the fraction of known resources that are 



economically feasible for extraction given current prices and technologies, resources (classified as “measured,” “indicated,” and 

“inferred”) represent known resources that are not economic to classify as reserves or are too speculative because the geological 

sampling information is preliminary. 



 

10 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

and 2013, respectively (Table 1). China has a lower market share with 59% of total mine 

production, compared to a 70% share of reserves. 

Table 2. Global Estimates of Mined Indium From Zinc Ores, 2009 and 2013 (tonnes) 

  

  



Mine Production 

of Zinc

a

 

('000s tonnes) 

 

Estimated Sphalerite 

(Zns) Production 

('000s tonnes) 

 

Estimated Indium Content 

of Mined Zinc Ores 

  

  



2009 

2013 

 

2009 

2013 

  (ppm)

b

  2009 (t)  2013

c

 (t) 

Australia 

 

1,290 


1,400 

 

1,925 



2,090 

 

15 



29 

31 


Bolivia

d

 



 

422 


400 

 

630 



597 

 

20 



13 

12 


Canada

e

 



 

702 


550 

 

1,048 



821 

 

37 



39 

30 


China 

 

3,100 



5,000 

 

4,627 



7,463 

 

50 



231 

373 


India

d

 



 

695 


800 

 

1,037 



1,194 

 

20 



21 

24 


Ireland

d

 



 

386 


330 

 

576 



493 

 

20 



12 

10 


Kazakhstan

d

   



480 

370 


 

716 


552 

 

20 



14 

11 


Mexico 

 

390 



600 

 

582 



896 

 

20 



12 

18 


Peru 

 

1,510 



1,290 

 

2,254 



1,925 

 

20 



45 

39 


United States   

736 


760 

 

1,099 



1,134 

 

20 



22 

23 


Other 

 

1,490 



1,950 

 

2,224 



2,910 

 

20 



44 

58 


Total___11,200__13,500____16,700__20,100'>Total 

   11,200 

13,500 

 

16,700 

20,100 

 

 

481 

629 

a

 Estimates zinc content of concentrates and shipping ores. 



Roskill (2010) believes that the actual amount of indium contained in the zinc ores may be much higher than estimated because 

some deposits contain much higher levels of indium than assumed.  

2013 estimates of indium production derived using Roskill (2010) estimates of indium concentration applied to 2013 USGS zinc 



production data. 

d

 Roskill (2010) does not give an exact estimate of indium concentration in zinc ores. A value of 20 ppm is used, because this 



value is used most frequently in that particular study. 

e

 Estimates for 2009 zinc mine production from the Canadian Minerals Yearbook (Trelawny and Pearce 2009) and 2013 



estimates are from USGS mineral commodity surveys. 

Source: Own calculations; Tolcin 2010a, 2010b, 2014b; Roskill 2010; Trelawny and Pearce 2009

 

 

As previously discussed, indium is also  produced from metals such as copper, tin, and silver. As 



tabulated in Table 3, indium mined along with copper and tin ores is estimated to add a further 

60–65 tonnes to annual global mine production (Roskill 2010). Potential known sources include 

copper ores mined in Russia and China, as well as tin ores mined in China. In addition, 

Falconbridge Ltd. produced indium from dusts recovered during copper smelting at its Canadian 

operations. Between 2009 and 2013, copper and tin production grew at rates of ~3.2% and ~–

7.0%, respectively. Assuming that indium production from these sources has kept in line with 

main product production, total world mine production of indium from copper and tin resources 

was ~68–74 tonnes in 2013 (Table 3). 



Table 3. Summary Estimate of Indium Content of Various Mined Ores

 

Estimate of Indium Mined From Zinc, Copper, and Tin Ores

 

 



2009 (tonnes)

 

2013 (tonnes)

 

Zinc


 

481


 

629


 

Copper and tin

 

60–65


 

68–74


 

Total

 

541–546

 

697–703

 

 






Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   40


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə