The Book of Daniel


Background to the Book of Daniel and Sources Defending its Authenticity



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Background to the Book of Daniel and Sources Defending its Authenticity
Waltke, Bruce, “The Date of the Book of Daniel.” Bibliotheca Sacra 133 (1976) 319-326.
This article is available for free online at http://faithsaves.net/Gods-Word/.
Bruce Waltke earned a B. A. from Houghton College, a Th. M. and Th. D. from Dallas Theological Seminary, and a Ph. D. from Harvard University. His doctorate at Dallas was in Greek and New Testament, and his doctorate at Harvard was in ancient Near Eastern languages and literature. He has held professorships in Old Testament at Dallas Theological Seminary, Regent College, Westminster Theological Seminary, Reformed Theological Seminary, and Knox Theological Seminary. He has written many scholarly books and served as a director for a number of archaeological investigations.
Archer, Gleason L. Jr., “Modern Rationalism and the Book of Daniel.”  Bibliotheca Sacra 136:542 [April 1979] 129-147.
A fine survey and refutation of anti-supernaturalist views of Daniel.
Archer, Gleason L. Jr., A Survey of Old Testament Introduction, 3rd. ed.  Chicago, IL: Moody Press, 1994.
This book is one of the best overall introductions to the Old Testament, with careful and scholarly defenses of the historicity of each book of the Hebrew Scriptures, including the book of Daniel.
Harrison, Roland K., Introduction to the Old Testament. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1969.
This work is another worthwhile introduction to the Old Testament and defense of Biblical historicity.
Roland K. Harrison earned a B. D., Th. M., and Ph. D. at the University of London. After teaching at Clifton College, Bristol, he became Professor of Old Testament at Huron College, University of Western Ontario, and then Professor of Old Testament at Wycliffe College, University of Toronto. The author of many books, he has been called one of the most competent Old Testament scholars of his day.
Wilson, Robert Dick, Studies in the Book of Daniel:  A Discussion of the Historical Questions, 2 Vol. New York, NY:  G. P. Putnam, 1917.
This work is available for free at http://faithsaves.net/Gods-Word/. It is extremely detailed and thorough, representing some of the best scholarship of its day. Because of its detail, it is an advanced resource, not an introductory work.
Robert Dick Wilson completed his undergraduate work at Princeton at the age of twenty. After studying at Western Theological Seminary and the University of Berlin, he proceeded to earn his Ph. D. from Princeton University. He then engaged in post-doctoral studies at the University of Berlin. He also received a D. D. from Lafayette College and an LL. D. from Wooster College. He became Professor of Semitic Philology and Old Testament at Western Theological Seminary before moving to Princeton Theological Seminary, where he taught for nearly three decades. He spent his final years teaching at Westminster Theological Seminary. He mastered Hebrew, Greek, Aramaic, Syriac, Arabic, Latin, French, German, Italian, Spanish, and many other languages—a total of 26 in all. At the age of 25, he undertook the following program of study:

I decided that I would give my life . . . [to] the Old Testament. . . . I felt I might reasonably live till I was 70, so I divided my life into periods of 15 years. I gave myself the first 15 years to study languages . . . I would learn all the Semitic languages, every language which threw light on the vocabulary or the syntax of the Old Testament. Of course, I did already know Syriac, and Aramaic, and Hebrew, but there was Ethiopic and Phoenician and Babylonian, and Assyrian, and a number of others—about twelve different Aramaic dialects. Secondly, I would learn all languages that threw light on the history of the Old Testament, taking in Egyptian, Coptic, and others. Then, thirdly, I would learn all languages that threw light on the text of the Old Testament, down to the year 600 after Christ . . . that took me into Armenian and several other languages, Gothic, and Anglo-Saxon, etc. . . . The second part of my life I would devote to . . . studying the text of the Old Testament, the comparison of the Hebrew text with the Versions, Greek, Latin, Syriac, especially, and all the versions down to 600. . . . The last 15 years, after which I had acquianted myself with all the machinery, I would tackle the subject which is called the [anti-supernaturalist] Higher Criticism of the Old Testament, including all that the critics have said, and so be able by that time to defend the history, the veracity of the Old Testament.173

After many years of the highest level of scholarly research, what was Dr. Wilson’s conclusion? “The evidence in our possession has convinced me that . . . the OT in Hebrew [is] . . . immediately inspired by God . . . [and] by his singular care and providence [has] been kept pure in all ages . . . no one . . . [can] show that the Old Testament . . . is not true.”174 “I can tell you . . . with the fullest assurance that ‘Jesus loves me, this I know, For the Bible tells me so.’”175
Pusey, Edward B., Daniel the Prophet: Nine Lectures, Delivered in the Divinity School of the University of Oxford, with Copious Notes. Oxford: John Henry & James Parker; Rivingtons, 1864.
This advanced work also available for free online at http://faithsaves.net/Gods-Word/. Even the most virulent of anti-supernaturalist Bible critics such as S. R. Driver admitted that “E. B. Pusey[’s] . . . Daniel the Prophet . . . [is] extremely learned and thorough.”176
Dr. Pusey studied at Oxford, Göttingen, and Berlin. n A extremely capable linguist and scholar, he was Regius Professor of Hebrew at Oxford for 54 years.
Hengstenberg, Ernst Wilhelm, Dissertations on the Genuineness of Daniel.  Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1848.
This advanced work is also available for free online at http://faithsaves.net/Gods-Word/.
Ernst W. Hengstenberg, a master philologist and scholar, received his doctorate from the Univesrity of Berlin, where he taught for many years.
Material specifically on Daniel’s Prophecy of the 70 Weeks (Daniel 9)
Hoehner, Harold W., Chronological Aspects of the Life of Christ. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1977.
While Hoehner’s entire book is not available online, the chapter of his book on Daniel’s 70 weeks is substantially reproduced from the article Harold W. Hoegher, “Chronological Aspects of the Life of Christ, part 6: Daniel’s seventy weeks and New Testament Chronology,” Bibliotheca Sacra 132 (Jan-March 1975) 47-65, which is available for free online at http://faithsaves.net/Gods-Word/.
Harold Hoeher received a Th. M. and Th. D. from Dallas Theological Seminary and a Ph. D. from Cambridge University. He engaged in postdoctoral studies at Tübingen University and Cambridge University. He joined the faculty of Dallas Theological Seminary in 1955 and directed the seminary’s doctoral program from 1975 to 2002. He wrote many scholarly articles and several books.
Anderson, Robert, The Coming Prince. Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel, 2008 (repr. ed.)
This classic and detailed examination of Daniel’s prophecy of the seventy weeks by theologian and lawyer Sir Robert Anderson explicates the compelling evidence that Daniel predicted the exact year and day upon which Christ presented Himself as the Messiah to Israel. It is available free online at http://faithsaves.net/Gods-Word/. Hoehner’s analysis above, a more recent work, incorporates important discoveries made after Anderson’s original publication of his book in 1881.
Debates
“The Old Testament is Mainly Fiction, not Fact” (Dan Barker, Affirm; Thomas Ross, Deny). Elec. acc. http://faithsaves.net/Gods-Word/.
Dan Barker is the president of the Freedom From Religion Foundation, the largest atheist organization in the United States. Thomas Ross (B. A., University of California, Berkeley; M. A., Fairhaven Bapitst College; M. Div., Great Plains Baptist Divinity School; Th. M., Anchor Baptist Theological Seminary, Ph. D. (cand.), Great Plains Baptist Divinity School) has taught at several independent Baptist seminaries. He is the author of the composition you are currently reading, and he employed many arguments expounded in this work in his debate with Mr. Barker.
“Was Jesus a Myth?” (Dan Barker Affirm; James White, Deny). Elec. acc. http://faithsaves.net/Gods-Word/.

Dr. White received a B. A. from Grand Canyon College, an M. A. from Fuller Theological Seminary, and a Th. M., D. Min, and Th. D. from Columbia Evangelical Seminary, where he serves as a faculty mentor.


Material on Other Clear Predictive Prophecies in the Bible
Ross, Thomas, “Truth from the Torah, Nevi’im, and Kethuvim [the Law, Prophets, and Writings].”
An introductory discussion of many of the Messianic prophecies of Scripture, available free online at http://faithsaves.net/Messiah-truth/.
Hengstenberg, Ernst Wilhelm, Christology of the Old Testament.  Mac Dill, FL: MacDonald Publishing, n. d.
An extremely detailed and careful analysis of many of the Old Testament’s Messianic prophecies, available free online at http://faithsaves.net/theology-proper-christology-and-pneumatology/.

The Bible and Archaeology
Cloud, David, Bible Times and Ancient Kingdoms: Treasures from Archaeology. London, Ontario: Way of Life Literature, 2014.
An easy-to-understand introductory examination of Biblical archaeology.
Free, Joseph P., rev. Howard F. Vos, Archaeology and Bible History.  Grand Rapids, MI:  Zondervan, 1992.
This composition by Free and Vos is more detailed and technical than Cloud’s work but less so than Kenneth Kitchen’s work.
Joseph Free (B. A., M. A., Ph. D., Princeton University) engaged in posdoctoral studies at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago for 8 years following his receipt of his Ph. D. He was Professor of Archaeology at Wheaton College for 32 years and the director of the Archaeology program for 23 years. He also taught at Bemidji State College for 8 years. He also founded the Near East Archaelogical Society, engaged in very extensive archaeological excavattions in the Holy Land, and served as Director of the Near East School of Archaeology on the Mount of Olives, Jerusalem. His testimony, after many years of study, was: “My position is that of the Bible believer. Although in college days I came to the place where I wondered whether God existed, I now hold to the historic and traditional position of the Christian church . . . because I became convinced that it is true. The evidences from archaeology, fulfilled prophecy, Christian experience, and many other areas left me with no other choice than to acknowledge the Bible as the Word of God in the most complete sense.”177
Kitchen, Kenneth A., Ancient Orient and Old Testament. London: Inter-Varsity Press, 1966.
This work is an advanced scholarly study of the subject of the reliability of the Old Testament. It is available free online at http://faithsaves.net/Gods-Word/. The book below by Dr. Kitchen is more up-to-date, but it is not available for free online.
Kitchen, Kenneth A., On the Reliability of the Old Testament.  Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2006.
This work by Dr. Kitchen is an advanced scholarly study of the subject.
Dr. Kitchen was Personal and Brunner Professor Emeritus of Egyptology and Honorary Research Fellow at the School of Archaeology, Classics, and Oriental Studies, University of Liverpool, England. The author of over 250 books and journal articles, he is one of the leading Egyptologists of modern times. Concerning the historical reliability of the Bible, he wrote:

On the independent evidence from antiquity itself, we may safely deliver a firm “No” to [the] question . . . [of] whether or not . . . the Hebrew Bible . . . [is] pure fiction, unrelated to the world of the Near East in circa 2000–400 b.c. . . . What can be said of historical reliability? Here our answer—on the evidence available—is . . . positive. The periods most in the glare of contemporary documents—the divided monarchy and the exile and return—show a very high level of direct correlation (where adequate data exist) and of reliability. That fact should be graciously accepted by all, regardless of personal starting point, and with the firm exclusion of alien, hence irrelevant, modern “agendas.” When we go back (before ca. 1000) to periods when inscriptional mentions of a then-obscure tribal community and its antecedent families (and founding family) simply cannot be expected a priori, then chronologically typological comparisons of the biblical and external phenomena show clearly that the Hebrew founders bear the marks of reality and of a definite period. The same applies to the Hebrews’ exodus from Egypt and appearance in Canaan . . . [and the] Sinai covenant (all three versions, Deuteronomy included)[.] . . . The phenomena of the united monarchy fit well into what we know of the period and of ancient royal usages. The primeval protohistory embodies early popular tradition going very far back, and is set in an early format. Thus we have a consistent level of good, fact-based correlations right through from circa 2000 b.c. (with earlier roots) down to 400 b.c. In terms of general reliability—and much more could have been instanced than there was room for here—the Old Testament comes out remarkably well, so long as its writings and writers are treated fairly and evenhandedly, in line with independent data, open to all. . . . Let us agree, at last, quietly to part with imaginary and outdated evolutionary schemes [those of anti-supernaturalist theories of the Old Testament] and give them decent and final burial.178
General Material on the Defense of Christianity
Cloud, David, An Unshakeable Faith: A Christian Apologetics Course. Port Huron, MI: Way of Life, 2001.
An easy-to-understand introduction to the evidences for Christianity.
Geisler, Norman L. ed., Baker Encyclopedia of Christian Apologetics, Baker Reference Library. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books, 1999.
This book is a valuable survey of many topics in the case for Christianity. There are many, many books on the subject; the articles in this Encyclopedia each contain a bibliography for those who desire to investigate further. The article “The Argument Against Miracles” has been reproduced by permission at http://faithsaves.net/argument-against-miracles/.
Norman Geisler (B. A., M. A., Wheaton College; Th. B., William Tyndale College; Ph. D., Loyola University) has taught at Wheaton College, Detroit Bible College, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, and Dallas Theological Seminary. He was the dean of the Liberty Center for Research and Scholarship before co-founding Southern Evangelical Seminary, where he served for a number of years until he became the Chancellor of Veritas Evangelical Seminary. He has written over 100 books.
Answers to Alleged Bible Contradictions
“Answering Alleged Bible Contradictions and Difficulties,” http://faithsaves.net/Gods-Word/.
A basic overview available free on the Internet.
Cloud, David, Things Hard to be Understood: A Handbook of Biblical Difficulties. Port Huron, MI: Way of Life Literature, 2015.
A valuable overview of many of the alleged contradictions and problems in the Bible, demonstrating the consistency and non-contradictory nature of Biblical Christianity.
Archer, Gleason L., New International Encyclopedia of Bible Difficulties, Zondervan’s Understand the Bible Reference Series. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House, 1982.
A third useful work on this topic.
B.) Bibliography

Albright, William F., “The Date and Personality of the Chronicler.” Journal of Biblical Literature, XL (1921) 104-124.


Anderson, Robert, The Coming Prince. Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel, 2008 (repr. ed.)
Anderson, Robert A., Signs and Wonders: A Commentary on the Book of Daniel, International Theological Commentary. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1984.
Anderson, Steven D., Darius the Mede:  A Reappraisal.  Grand Rapids, MI:  CreateSpace Independent Publishing, 2014.
“Answering Alleged Bible Contradictions and Difficulties,” http://faithsaves.net/Gods-Word/.
Archer, Gleason L. Jr., A Survey of Old Testament Introduction, 3rd. ed.  Chicago, IL: Moody Press, 1994.
Archer, Gleason L. Jr., Daniel (Expositor’s Bible Commentary 7; ed. Frank E. Gaebelein and J. D. Douglas; Accordance electronic ed). Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1985.
Archer, Gleason L. Jr., “Modern Rationalism and the Book of Daniel.”  Bibliotheca Sacra 136:542 [April 1979] 129-147.
Archer, Gleason L., New International Encyclopedia of Bible Difficulties, Zondervan’s Understand the Bible Reference Series. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House, 1982.
Athas, George, “In Search of the Seventy ‘Weeks’ of Daniel 9,” Journal of Hebrew Scriptures 9:2 (2009) 2-20.
Baldwin, Joyce G., “Is There Pseudonymity in the Old Testament?” Themelios 4:1 (January/September 1978) 6-12.
Barker, Dan & James White, “Was Jesus a Myth?” Elec. acc. http://faithsaves.net/Gods-Word/.
Barker, Dan & Justin Bass, “Jesus of Nazareth: Lord or Legend?” debate on June 6, 2015; elec. acc. http://danielbwallace.com/2015/08/01/fact-checking-dan-barker-from-our-recent-debate-june-6-2015/.
Barker, Dan & Thomas Ross, “The Old Testament is Mainly Fiction, not Fact.” Elec. acc. http://faithsaves.net/barker-ross-debate/.
Barnes, Albert, Notes on the Old Testament: Daniel.  London: Blackie & Son, 1853.
Barnes, Albert, Barnes’ Notes, Daniel.  Grand Rapids, MI:  Baker Books, 1998.
Bass, Justin, “Fact Checking Dan Barker: From Our Recent Debate June 6, 2015,” http://danielbwallace.com/2015/08/01/fact-checking-dan-barker-from-our-recent-debate-june-6-2015/.
Beckwith, Roger T., “Daniel 9 and the Date of Messiah’s Coming in Essene, Hellenistic, Pharisaic, Zealot and Early Christian Computation.” Revue de Qumran 40 (1981) 521-542.
Beckwith, Roger T., “Early Traces of the Book of Daniel.” Tyndale Bulletin 53:1 (2002) 75-82.
Beckwith, Roger T., The Old Testament Canon of the New Testament Church and Its Background in Early Judaism.  London: SPCK, 1985.
Brand, Chad et al. ed., Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary. Nashville, TN: Holman Bible Publishers, 2003.
Brenton, Lancelot Charles Lee, The Septuagint Version of the Old Testament: English Translation.  London: Samuel Bagster and Sons, 1870.
Bromiley, Geoffrey W. ed., The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised.  Eerdmans: 1979–1988.
Charles, Robert Henry ed., Apocrypha of the Old Testament. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1913.
Charles, Robert Henry ed., Pseudepigrapha of the Old Testament, 2 Vol. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1913.
Cloud, David, An Unshakeable Faith: A Christian Apologetics Course. Port Huron, MI: Way of Life, 2001.
Cloud, David, Bible Times and Ancient Kingdoms: Treasures from Archaeology. London, Ontario: Way of Life Literature, 2014.
Cloud, David, Things Hard to be Understood: A Handbook of Biblical Difficulties. Port Huron, MI: Way of Life Literature, 2015.
Daubney, William Heaford, The Use of the Apocrypha in the Christian Church.  London: C. J. Clay and Sons; Cambridge University Press, 1900.
Davis, John D., “Exegetical Theology. Review of The Messages of the Bible: The Messages of the Apocalyptical Writers by Frank Chamberlain Porter.” The Princeton Theological Review IV, no. 1–4 (1906): 407-408.
Dines, Jennifer M. & Michael A. Knibb, The Septuagint.  London: T & T Clark, 2004.
Dougherty, Raymond Philip, Nabonidus and Belshazzar.  Yale Oriental Series Researches, vol. 15. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1929.
Douglas, George C. M., “The Book of Daniel.” The Presbyterian and Reformed Review 13:49–52 (1902): 224-253
Driver, Samuel Rolles, An Introduction to the Literature of the Old Testament. New York, NY: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1914.
Driver, Samuel Rolles, The Book of Daniel with Introduction and Notes, The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1900.
Elwell, Walter A. & Barry J. Beitzel, Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Book House, 1988.
Free, Joseph P., rev. Howard F. Vos, Archaeology and Bible History.  Grand Rapids, MI:  Zondervan, 1992.
Fuller, David Otis ed., Which Bible? Grand Rapids, MI: Institute for Biblical Textual Studies, 1997.
Gaebelien, Frank E., ed., Expositor’s Bible Commentary.  Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1990.
Gammie, John G., book review of Daniel:  Introduction and Commentary, by Joyce G. Baldwin.  Journal of Biblical Literature 99 (1980) 453.
Geisler, Norman L. & William E. Nix, A General Introduction to the Bible. rev. & exp. ed.  Chicago, IL:  Moody Press, 1986.
Geisler, Norman L. ed., Baker Encyclopedia of Christian Apologetics, Baker Reference Library. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books, 1999.
Gesenius, Wilhelm, Gesenius’ Hebrew Grammar, ed. E. Kautzch, trans. Cowley, 2nd. ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1910.
Glueck, Nelson, Rivers in the Desert: A History of the Negev. New York, NY: W. W. Norton, 1959.
Goldingay, John E., Daniel. Word Biblical Commentary 30; Accordance electronic ed. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1989.
Goldingay, John E., “The Book of Daniel: Three Issues.” Themelios 2:2 (1977) 45-49.
Greenspahn, Frederick E., An Introduction to Aramaic, 2nd ed., Vol. 46, Resources for Biblical Study. Atlanta, GA: Society of Biblical Literature, 2003.
Harman, Allan M., A Study Commentary on Daniel, EP Study Commentary. Darlington, England: Evangelical Press, 2007.
Harrison, Roland K., Introduction to the Old Testament. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1969.
Hart, J. H. A., Ecclesiasticus: The Greek Text of Codex 248. Cambridge:  Cambridge University Press, 1909.
Hartman, Louis F. & Alexander A. Di Lella, The Book of Daniel: A New Translation with Notes and Commentary on Chapters 1-9, vol. 23, Anchor Yale Bible. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008.
Hengstenberg, Ernst Wilhelm, Christology of the Old Testament.  Mac Dill, FL: MacDonald Publishing, n. d.
Hengstenberg, Ernst Wilhelm, Dissertations on the Genuineness of Daniel.  Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1848. 
Herodotus, Herodotus, with an English Translation by A. D. Godley, ed. A. D. Godley. Medford, MA: Harvard University Press, 1920.
Hoehner, Harold W., Chronological Aspects of the Life of Christ. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1977.
Jerome, Jerome’s Commentary on Daniel, trans. Gleason L. Archer. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books, 1977.
Jones, Clay, “The Bibliographical Test Updated.” Christian Research Journal 35:3 (2012).
Josephus, Flavius et al., Flavius Josephus: Translation and Commentary: Judean Antiquities, 5 vol. Boston, MA: Brill, 1999-2013.
Josephus, Flavius & William Whiston, The Works of Josephus: Complete and Unabridged. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1987.
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Franz Delitzsch, Commentary on the Old Testament. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1996.
Kitchen, Kenneth A., Ancient Orient and Old Testament. London: Inter-Varsity Press, 1966.
Kitchen, Kenneth A., On the Reliability of the Old Testament.  Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2006.
Lampe, Joseph J., “The Authenticity and Genuineness of Daniel,” The Presbyterian and Reformed Review 6, no. 21–24 (1895) 440-480.
Mangano, Mark, Esther & Daniel, The College Press NIV Commentary. Joplin, MO: College Press, 2001.
Matthews, Victor Harold, Mark W. Chavalas & John H. Walton, The IVP Bible Background Commentary: Old Testament, electronic ed. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2000.
Miller, Stephen R., Daniel, Vol. 18, The New American Commentary. Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1994.
Montgomery, J. A., A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Book of Daniel, International Critical Commentary Series. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1972 reprint.
Neusner, Jacob, The Babylonian Talmud: A Translation and Commentary. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Publishers, 2011.
Neusner, Jacob, Alan J. Avery-Peck & William Scott Green, eds., The Encyclopedia of Judaism. Leiden: Brill, 2000.
Nicks, Brian, “Life and Work of Robert Dick Wilson.” The Master’s Seminary Journal 19/1 (Spring 2008) 91-106.
Oesterley, William Oscar Emil, An Introduction to the Books of the Apocrypha. New York, NY: Macmillan, 1935.
Oesterley, William Oscar Emil, The Wisdom of Jesus the Son of Sirach or Ecclesiasticus in the Revised Version with Introduction and Notes, The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1912.
Orr, James ed., The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia.  Chicago, IL: The Howard-Severance Company, 1915.
Payne, J. Barton ed., New Perspectives on the Old Testament. Waco: Word, 1970.
Pentecost, J. Dwight, Things to Come. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1958.
Pfeiffer, R. H., Introduction to the Old Testament.  New York, NY: Harper, 1941.
Prince, J. Dyneley, A Critical Commentary on the Book of Daniel: Designed Especially for Students of the English Bible. Leipzig: J. C. Hinrichs’sche Buchhandlung, 1899. 
Pusey, Edward B., Daniel the Prophet: Nine Lectures, Delivered in the Divinity School of the University of Oxford, with Copious Notes. Oxford: John Henry & James Parker; Rivingtons, 1864.
Pritchard, James Bennett, ed., The Ancient Near Eastern Texts Relating to the Old Testament, 3rd ed. with Supplement. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1969.
Roberts, Alexander, James Donaldson & A. Cleveland Coxe ed., Fathers of the Third Century: Gregory Thaumaturgus, Dionysius the Great, Julius Africanus, Anatolius and Minor Writers, Methodius, Arnobius, vol. 6, The Ante-Nicene Fathers. Buffalo, NY: Christian Literature Company, 1886.
Ross, Thomas, “Daniel 3:25—‘the Son of God,’ or ‘a son of the gods’?” Elec. acc. http://faithsaves.net/Daniel-325-Son-God/.
Ross, Thomas, “Evidences for the Inspiration of the Hebrew Vowel Points.” Elec. acc. http://faithsaves.net/Bibliology/.
Ross, Thomas, “Truth from the Torah, Nevi’im, and Kethuvim [the Law, Prophets, and Writings].” Elec. acc. http://faithsaves.net/Messiah-truth/.
Sargent, Robert, Landmarks of Bible Prophecy.  Oak Harbor, WA:  Bible Baptist Church Publications, 1998.
Shea, William H., “Daniel 3:  Extra-Biblical Texts and the Convocation on the Plain of Dura,” Andrews University Seminary Studies 20:1 (Spring 1982) 29-52.
Shea, William H., Selected Studies on Prophetic Interpretation, ed. Frank B. Holbrook, Revised Edition, Vol. 1, Daniel and Revelation Committee Series. Silver Spring, MD: Biblical Research Institute, 1992.
Skehan, Patrick W. & Alexander A. Di Lella, The Wisdom of Ben Sira: A New Translation with Notes, Introduction and Commentary, vol. 39, Anchor Yale Bible. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2008.
Skilton, John H. ed., The Law and the Prophets: Old Testament Studies Prepared in Honor of Oswald Thompson Allis. Phillipsburg, NJ: Presbyterian and Reformed, 1974.
Smith, Mark S. & Simon B. Parker, Ugaritic Narrative Poetry, vol. 9, Writings from the Ancient World. Atlanta, GA: Scholars Press, 1997.
Tanner, J. Paul, “Is Daniel’s Seventy-Weeks Prophecy Messianic?” Part 1, Bibliotheca Sacra 166 (April-June 2009) 181-200.
Tanner, J. Paul, “Is Daniel’s Seventy-Weeks Prophecy Messianic?” Part 2, Bibliotheca Sacra 166 (July-September 2009) 319-335.
Tenney, Merrill C. ed., Zondervan Pictorial Encyclopedia of the Bible, 5 vol. Grand Rapids, MI:  Zondervan, 1975.
Thiele, Edwin R., The Mysterious Numbers of the Hebrew Kings. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1965.
Thiessen, Henry, Introduction to the New Testament. Grand Rapids, MI:  Eerdmans, 1950.
Timothy H. Lim et al., The Dead Sea Scrolls in Their Historical Context. London: T&T Clark, 2004.
Tov, Emmanuel, Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible, 2nd rev. ed. Minneapolis, MN:  Fortress Press, 2001.
Towner, W. Sibley, Daniel, Interpretation. Atlanta, GA: John Knox Press, 1984.
Van der Merwe, Christo H. J., J. Naude & J. Kroeze, A Biblical Hebrew Reference Grammar. Sheffield, England:  Sheffield Academic Press, 2000.
Waltke, Bruce K. & Michael Patrick O’Connor, An Introduction to Biblical Hebrew Syntax. Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns, 1990.
Waltke, Bruce, “The Date of the Book of Daniel.” Bibliotheca Sacra 133 (1976) 319-326.
Walton, John H., “The Four Kingdoms of Daniel.” Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society 29:1 (March 1986) 25-36.
Walvoord, John F., Daniel:  The Key to Prophetic Revelation.  Chicago, IL:  Moody Press, 1989 & Galaxie Software, 2008.
Wegner, Paul D., A Student’s Guide to Textual Criticism of the Bible: Its History, Methods & Results. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2006.
Whitcomb, John C. Jr., Darius the Mede. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1959.
Wickes, William, Two Treatises on the Accentuation of the Old Testament. Brooklyn, NY: KTAV, 1881.
Wilson, Robert Dick, “Darius the Mede.” The Princeton Theological Review 20:1-4 (1922) 177-211.
Wilson, Robert Dick, Studies in the Book of Daniel:  A Discussion of the Historical Questions. New York, NY:  G. P. Putnam, 1917.  
Wilson, Robert D., “The Aramaic of Daniel,” in Biblical and Theological Studies, by the faculty of Princeton Theological Seminary.  New York, NY: Scribener’s, 1912.
Wiseman, D.J., T.C. Mitchell, R. Joyce, W.J. Martin & K.A. Kitchen, Notes on Some Problems in Daniel. London: Tyndale Press, 1965.
Wright, Charles H. H., Daniel and His Prophecies. London: Williams and Norgate, 1906.
Wyatt, Nicolas, Religious Texts from Ugarit, 2nd ed., Biblical Seminar, 53. London: Sheffield Academic Press, 2002.
Young, Edward J., An Introduction to the Old Testament. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1977.
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