The Ecology of Seeds



Yüklə 53,32 Kb.

tarix08.08.2018
ölçüsü53,32 Kb.


The Ecology of Seeds

How many seeds should a plant produce, and how big should they be? How

often should a plant produce them? Why and how are seeds dispersed, and

what are the implications for the diversity and composition of vegetation?

These are just some of the questions tackled in this wide-ranging review of the

role of seeds in the ecology of plants. The authors bring together information

on the ecological aspects of seed biology, starting with a consideration of

reproductive strategies in seed plants and progressing through the life cycle,

covering seed maturation, dispersal, storage in the soil, dormancy,

germination, seedling establishment and regeneration in the field. The text

encompasses a wide range of concepts of general relevance to plant ecology,

reflecting the central role that the study of seed ecology has played in

elucidating many fundamental aspects of plant community function.

M i c h a e l F e n n e r is a senior lecturer in ecology in the School of Biological

Sciences at the University of Southampton, UK. He is author of Seed Ecology

(1985) and editor of Seeds: The Ecology of Regeneration in Plant Communities,

2nd edition (2000).

K e n T h o m p s o n is a research fellow and honorary senior lecturer in the

Department of Animal and Plant Sciences at the University of Sheffield, UK.

He is author of The Soil Seed Banks of North West Europe (1997) and An Ear to the



GroundGarden Science for Ordinary Mortals (2003).

www.cambridge.org

© Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press

0521653681 

- The Ecology of Seeds

Michael Fenner and Ken Thompson

Frontmatter

More information



The Ecology

of Seeds


Michael Fenner

University of Southampton, Southampton, UK

Ken Thompson

University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK

www.cambridge.org

© Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press

0521653681 

- The Ecology of Seeds

Michael Fenner and Ken Thompson

Frontmatter

More information




p u b l i s h e d b y t h e p r e s s s y n d i c a t e o f t h e u n i v e r s i t y o f c a m b r i d g e

The Pitt Building, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, United Kingdom

c a m b r i d g e u n i v e r s i t y p r e s s

The Edinburgh Building, Cambridge, CB2 2RU, UK

40 West 20th Street, New York, NY 10011--4211, USA

477 Williamstown Road, Port Melbourne, VIC 3207, Australia

Ruiz de Alarc´

on 13, 28014 Madrid, Spain

Dock House, The Waterfront, Cape Town 8001, South Africa

http://www.cambridge.org

C

M. Fenner and K. Thompson 2004



This book is in copyright. Subject to statutory exception

and to the provisions of relevant collective licensing agreements,

no reproduction of any part may take place without

the written permission of Cambridge University Press.

First published 2004

Printed in the United Kingdom at the University Press, Cambridge



Typeface Swift 9.5/14 pt.

System L

A

TEX 2



ε [tb]

A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library

Library of Congress Cataloguing in Publication data

Fenner, Michael, 1949--

The ecology of seeds/by Michael Fenner & Ken Thompson.

p.

cm.



Includes bibliographical references and index.

ISBN 0 521 65311 8 (hardback) -- ISBN 0 521 65368 1 (paperback)

1. Seeds -- Ecology.

2. Plants -- Reproduction.

I. Thompson, Ken, 1954--

II. Title.

QK661.F45

2004


581.4 67 -- dc22

2004045661

ISBN 0 521 65311 8 hardback

ISBN 0 521 65368 1 paperback

The publisher has used its best endeavours to ensure that URLs for external

websites referred to in this book are correct and active at the time of going to

press. However, the publisher has no responsibility for the websites and can make

no guarantee that a site will remain live or that the content is or will remain

appropriate.

www.cambridge.org

© Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press

0521653681 

- The Ecology of Seeds

Michael Fenner and Ken Thompson

Frontmatter

More information



Contents

List of boxes page

viii


Preface

ix

1 Life histories, reproductive strategies and allocation



1

1.1 Sexual vs. asexual reproduction in plants

1

1.2 Life histories and survival schedules



3

1.3 Variability of seed crops

12

1.4 The cost of reproduction



16

1.5 Reproductive allocation and effort

20

1.6 Seed size and number



23

1.7 Phenotypic variation in seed size

29

2 Pre-dispersal hazards

32

2.1 Fruit and seed set

32

2.2 Incomplete pollination



33

2.3 Ovule abortion

34

2.4 Resource limitation



39

2.5 Pre-dispersal seed predation

40

3 Seed dispersal

47

3.1 Wind dispersal

47

3.2 Dispersal by birds and mammals



51

3.3 Myrmecochory

60

3.4 Water and ballistic dispersal



62

3.5 Man, his livestock and machinery

63

3.6 Evolution of dispersal



67

3.7 Some final questions

72

v

www.cambridge.org



© Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press

0521653681 

- The Ecology of Seeds

Michael Fenner and Ken Thompson

Frontmatter

More information



vi

Contents


4 Soil seed banks

76

4.1 Seed banks in practice

78

4.2 Dormancy and seed size



80

4.3 Predicting seed persistence; hard seeds

82

4.4 Seed-bank dynamics



86

4.5 Serotiny

89

4.6 Ecological significance of seed banks



89

5 Seed dormancy

97

5.1 Types of seed dormancy

97

5.2 The function of seed dormancy



98

5.3 Defining dormancy

99

5.4 Microbes and seed dormancy



103

5.5 Effects of parental environment on dormancy

104

6 Germination

110

6.1 Temperature and germination

110

6.2 Responses of seeds to light



116

6.3 Water availability during germination

121

6.4 The soil chemical environment



123

6.5 Effects of climate change

131

7 Post-dispersal hazards

136

7.1 Post-dispersal predation

136

7.2 Loss to pathogens



140

7.3 Fatal germination at depth

141

7.4 Loss of viability with age



143

8 Seedling establishment

145

8.1 Early growth of seedlings

145

8.2 Seedling morphology



146

8.3 Relative growth rate

148

8.4 Seedling mineral requirements



152

8.5 Factors limiting establishment

155

8.6 Mycorrhizal inoculation of seedlings



159

8.7 Facilitation

160

8.8 Plasticity



161

9 Gaps, regeneration and diversity

163

9.1 Gaps, patches and safe sites

163

9.2 ‘Gaps’ difficult to define and detect



164

www.cambridge.org

© Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press

0521653681 

- The Ecology of Seeds

Michael Fenner and Ken Thompson

Frontmatter

More information



Contents

vii


9.3 Limitations to recruitment in gaps

167


9.4 Microtopography of soil surface

172


9.5 Gaps and species diversity

176


References

179


Index

241


www.cambridge.org

© Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press

0521653681 

- The Ecology of Seeds

Michael Fenner and Ken Thompson

Frontmatter

More information




Boxes

1.1 Trade-offs



page 4

2.1 Low seed set in sparse populations: the Allee effect

36

3.1 Why do plants have poisonous fruits?



58

3.2 Parent-offspring conflicts in germination and dispersal

74

4.1 Is seed persistence in soil a plant trait?



85

6.1 Response to smoke

129

9.1 Seed traits and plant abundance



169

9.2 Role of leaf litter in regeneration

175

viii


www.cambridge.org

© Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press

0521653681 

- The Ecology of Seeds

Michael Fenner and Ken Thompson

Frontmatter

More information




Preface

In 1985 one of us published a small book called Seed Ecology. It contained

42 000 words and cited 334 references. It was successful in introducing a genera-

tion of ecologists to our subject, but it is now seriously out of date and has been

out of print for some time. The book you are now holding contains 94 000 words

and cites 1117 references. Only a small part of this expansion can be attributed

to covering any part of the subject in more detail; nearly all of it reflects simply

the massive increase in interest in seed ecology in the past 20 years. One sign of

this expansion was the launch in 1991 of the journal Seed Science Research, provid-

ing a major platform for fundamental work in seed biology, including ecology;

37 of our cited references are from that journal. More recently, the International

Society for Seed Science was founded in 2000. This society sponsors meetings on

all aspects of seed science, including, for the first time in 2004, a major inter-

national meeting on seed ecology. Our cited references also reflect this recent

growth: 82% are from the past two decades, while 15% are post-1999.

Recent work in this field has transformed our understanding of many aspects

of seed ecology, especially dispersal, storage in the soil and the ecological role

of seed dormancy. There has also been increasing recognition that regeneration

from seed has fundamental impacts on the diversity and composition of plant

communities; seed ecology has never seemed more relevant to ‘mainstream’

plant ecology. Nevertheless, we have not lost sight of our debt to the pioneers

who laid the foundations for later work. Many of the most important figures in

the history of ecology, including Darwin, Harper and Salisbury, made significant

contributions to seed ecology.

In this book, we attempt to synthesize the current information available

on the ecological aspects of seed biology, starting with a consideration of

reproductive strategies in seed plants and the costs and compromises involved.

Special attention here is given to the interesting topic of seed size. The text

then follows the progress of seeds through the stages of their life cycle in a

ix

www.cambridge.org



© Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press

0521653681 

- The Ecology of Seeds

Michael Fenner and Ken Thompson

Frontmatter

More information



x

Preface


roughly chronological sequence: seed maturation, dispersal, storage in the soil,

dormancy, germination and seedling establishment. The final chapter gives an

account of the role that canopy gaps play in the regeneration of plants in the

field. Throughout the book, various specialized topics (which might otherwise

have interrupted the flow of the text) are presented in self-contained boxes.

We aimed to present a broadly representative overview of the current lit-

erature rather than a comprehensive review of it. We have tried to present a

reasonably balanced account of the field in a way that reflects current thinking.

Nevertheless, where we have strong feelings on particular topics, we have not

refrained from nailing our colours to the mast. When this happens, for exam-

ple concerning the definition of dormancy, we hope you find our arguments

convincing.

We hope that this text will be useful to students of plant ecology at all levels.

The regeneration of plants from seed involves a very wide range of ecological

concepts of current interest, from reproductive strategies to the maintenance of

species diversity. Pollination, seed dispersal and seed predation all offer inter-

esting insights into the evolution of plant--animal interactions. The numerous

trade-offs encountered (e.g. between seed size and number, early reduced repro-

duction vs. delayed increased fecundity, early high-risk germination vs. delayed

safer germination, etc.) offer scope for theoretical investigations and modelling.

We hope that the work reported here from the literature will stimulate students

into devising their own experimental investigations. Excellent undergraduate

projects on seed ecology can often be carried out in the field with a minimum

of technical resources.

Several colleagues provided substantially new figures or new versions of pub-

lished figures. We would particularly like to thank Costas Thanos, Mary Leck

and Bego˜

na Peco. Otherwise, the text is entirely our own work. We can there-

fore assert cheerfully that any errors and omissions are ours alone.

www.cambridge.org

© Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press

0521653681 

- The Ecology of Seeds

Michael Fenner and Ken Thompson

Frontmatter



More information


Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə