The Influence of Walter Benjamin on Benedict Anderson Anthony Taylor Biodata



Yüklə 140,35 Kb.

tarix14.12.2017
ölçüsü140,35 Kb.


 

The Influence of Walter Benjamin on Benedict Anderson 

Anthony Taylor 

Biodata: Anthony Taylor recently completed Honours in Indonesian studies at Monash 

University, Australia. He also holds a Bachelor of Laws degree. His research interests include 

Indonesian literature, law and politics. His contact email is taylor.af91@gmail.com 

Abstract 

The  influence  of  Walter  Benjamin  is  clearest  in  the  late  Benedict  Anderson’s  often-cited 

theory  of  nationalism.  Anderson  argues  that  the  combination  of  print-capitalism  and  the 

‘fatality  of  linguistic  diversity’  made  the  origin  and  spread  of  nationalism  possible.  He 

interprets nationalism as a cultural phenomenon, not an ideology. In Imagined Communities

Anderson  attempts  describe  the  real  historical  spread  of  nationalism  without  making  the 

claim that any particular nationalism was original or authentic. 

The  key  texts  from  which  these  ideas  are  drawn  are  The  Work  of  Art  in  the  Age  of 



Mechanical Reproduction and Theses on the Philosophy of History. From a reading of these 

texts, we can see that Benjamin has influenced Anderson’s understanding of the origin and 

spread  of  nationalism  through:  (1)  the  importance  afforded  to  print-capitalism;  (2)  the 

linkage  between  ‘homogenous,  empty  time’,  modernity  and  nationalism;  (3)  the  image  of 

the Angel of History. 

Following  an  explanation  of  these  three  points  of  influence,  two  criticisms  of  Anderson’s 

theory of nationalism that relate to his interpretation of Benjamin are then considered. The 

first  is  that  Anderson  overuses  Benjamin’s  concept  of  aura  in  explaining  the  spread  of 

nationalism,  most  clearly  when  he  seeks  to  establish  a  clear  binary  between  authentic, 

“popular”  nationalism  and  inauthentic,  “official”  State  nationalism.  The  second  is  that  the 

idea of nation and modernity should not be as strongly linked as Anderson proposes; there 

should be something more emancipatory awaiting us in modernity. I argue that the use of 

cosmology in Anderson’s last major work on nationalism, Under Three Flags, is a response to 

these  criticisms.  It  demonstrates  that  Anderson  has  taken  into  account  the  simultaneous 

optimism  and  pessimism  that  characterises  Benjamin  (particularly  in  his  attitude  towards 

Communism).  The  two  criticisms  considered  were,  implicitly,  a  claim  that  Anderson  had 

overemphasised  the  optimistic  or  pessimistic  side  of  Benjamin  in  his  treatment  of 

nationalism. Rather, Anderson acknowledges the relationship of nationalism, politics, State 

and modernity to be highly ambiguous.  

Keywords: Benedict Anderson, Walter Benjamin, Indonesian Studies, nationalism. 

Introduction 

In  Language  and  Power,  the  late  Benedict  Anderson  acknowledged  his  scholarly 

debt  to  ‘three  Good  Germans:  Karl  Marx,  Walter  Benjamin  and  Eric  Auerbach,  who 

helped  me  think  about  the  modern  world’.

1

  This  essay  will  scrutinise  Anderson’s 



reliance  on  the  thought  of  Walter  Benjamin,  particularly  his  essay  The  Work  of  Art 

                                                           

1

 Benedict R. O'G Anderson, Language and Power : Exploring Political Cultures in Indonesia (Ithaca, N.Y.: Ithaca, 



N.Y. : Cornell University Press, 1990)., 14. 


in  the  Age  of  Mechanical  Reproduction  (herein  ‘Mechanical  Reproduction’)  and 

Theses  on  the  Philosophy  of  History  (herein  ‘History’).

2

  The  overarching  aim  is  to 

better understand how Benjamin influenced Anderson’s theory of nationalism.  

I  begin  with  an  overview  of  Anderson’s  theory  of  nationalism.  The  theory  is 

presented  in  light  of  Anderson’s  later  modifications  to  the  original  theory  in 

Imagined  Communities.

3

  Following  this,  I  analyse  the  elements  of  this  theory  that 

are  most  obviously  inspired  by  Benjamin’s  Mechanical  Reproduction  and  History

the  notion  of  print-capitalism,  the  notion  of  homogenous,  empty  time  and  the 

image  of  the  Angel  of  History.  Through  a  focus  on  these  three  points  of  influence, 

the  broader  commonalities  between  Anderson  and  Benjamin  on  questions  of 

materialism, culture and politics emerge. Finally, I consider some critical responses 

to  Anderson’s  theory  of  nationalism  that  relate  to  the  influence  of  Benjamin  on 

Anderson.  I  argue  that  Anderson’s  most  recent  comment  on  nationalism,  Under 

Three Flags

4

, makes clear both his relative fidelity to Benjamin and his subtle stance 

towards nationalism. 



Anderson’s Theory of Nationalism 

In  Imagined  Communities,  Anderson  seeks  to  define  the  nation  and  account  for 

both the origin  and spread of nationalism. For Anderson, the nation is an imagined 

political community that is imagined as limited (territorially) and sovereign (State). 

It  is  imagined  as  a  horizontal  community  regardless  of  a  hierarchical  reality.

5

 



Anderson emphasises that the nation and nationalism is a ‘cultural artefact’, rather 

than a political ideology.

6

 

How  did  nationalism  first  emerge?  For  Anderson,  ‘print -capitalism’  –  the 



tandem  development  of  print  technology  and  its  use  in  capitalist  enterprise  made 

the  nation  something  imaginable.  The  growth  in  markets  for  print  commodities 

(particularly the demand for popular language material) undermined the sacredness 

of  script  languages,  the  legitimacy  of  international  dynastic  orders  and  of 

cosmological  world-views.

7

    Basically,  print-capitalism  undermined  old  ways  of 



imagining  the  world.  Following  this,  Anderson  argues  that  print-capitalism, 

                                                           

2

 Both found in Walter Benjamin, Illuminations (Schocken Books, 2007). 



3

 Benedict R. O'G Anderson, Imagined Communities : Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism, ed. 

Societies American Council of Learned, Rev. ed. ed. (London 

New York: London 

New York : Verso, 2006). Also Language and Power : Exploring Political Cultures in Indonesia. And The Spectre 

of Comparisons : Nationalism, Southeast Asia, and the World (New York 

London: New York 

London : Verso, 1998). 

4

 Under Three Flags : Anarchism and the Anti-Colonial Imagination, Anarchism and the Anti-Colonial 



Imagination (New York, NY: New York, NY : Verso, 2005). 

5

 Imagined Communities : Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism., 6. 



6

 Ibid., 4. 

7

 Ibid., 36. 




 

combined  with  the  fact  of  ‘the  fatality  of  human  linguistic  diversity’ ,  not  only 



negated  an  old  cultural  imaginary  but  made  the  nation  (as  a  new  way  of  imagining 

the  world)  a  positive possibility.

8

  The  growth  of  print  languages  (and  commodities) 



‘unified fields of exchange below Latin and above spoken vernaculars’, gave a sense 

of  antiquity,  through  fixity,  to  the  print  language  which  would  be  important  for 

subjective  ideas  of  nation,  and  created  culturally  central   ‘languages-of-power’.

9

  



The vernacular newspapers and novels that, more and more, came to be sold, were 

the  key  print  commodities  that  made  new  forms  of  consciousness  and  subjectivity 

possible.  

Anderson  argues  that  nationalism,  while  owing  a  lot  to  histo rical  forces  in 

Western  Europe,  first  became  a  political  reality  under  the  leadership  of  creoles  in 

the  Americas.  The  glass  ceiling  faced  by  talented  creoles  in  the  colonies  is  posited 

as  a  key  factor  in  the  development  of  nationalist  opposition  alongside  the 

publication  of  provincial  newspapers.

10

  Opposition  to  colonialism  was  what  made 



the  cultural  imagining  of  the  nation  important  politically.  Once  established, 

nationalism  ‘became  “modular”’,  capable  of  being  transplanted,  with  varying 

degrees of self-consciousness, to a great variety of social terrains, to merge and be 

merged  with…a  wide  variety  of  political  and  ideological  constellations.’

11

  Anderson 



goes  on  to  describe  the  later  “waves”  of  nationalism,  including  European 

nationalisms and twentieth century anti-colonial nationalisms. 

Both the State and popular movements around the world could make use of the 

national  “model”  for their  own  purposes.  In  The  Spectre  of  Comparisons,  Anderson 

argues that collective subjects (including nations) are formed by unb ound serialities 

(exemplified  by  print  mediums  such  as  newspapers,  and  by  references  to  open 

categories  like  “worker”  or  “citizen”)  and  by  bound  serialities  (exemplified  by  the 

counting  of  ethnic  categories  in  a  census).

12

  On  the  one  hand,  there  is  popular 



nationalism,  seen  in  revolutions  where  the  State  is  virtually  disabled  and  where 

unbound  seriality  is  dominant,  and  on  the  other  is  what  Anderson  calls  ‘official’ 

nationalism,  which  is  promoted  by  the  State  and  is  in  line  with  dominance  of  the 

bound seriality.

13

 As well as allowing for analysis of contemporary nationalisms, the 



distinction  between  bound  and  unbound  seriality  is  an  important  methodological 

clarification  of  how  we  should  understand  the  process  by  which  nationalism 

originated  and  spread.  With  the  notion  of  seriality,  there  is  no  ontological 

distinction  between  the  original  historical  national  model  and  its  replicas  around 

                                                           

8

 Ibid., 42-3. Note: ‘it would be a mistake to equate this fatality of linguistic diversity with that common 



element in nationalist ideologies which stresses the primordial fatality of particular languages…The essential 

thing is the interplay between fatality, technology and capitalism.’ 

9

 Ibid., 44-5. 



10

 Ibid., 57. 

11

 Ibid., 4. 



12

 The Spectre of Comparisons : Nationalism, Southeast Asia, and the World., 29.  

13

 Language and Power : Exploring Political Cultures in Indonesia., 95-7. 




the  world;  none  should  be  evaluated  in  terms  of  authenticity  or  against  th e  first 

historical  nationalisms.

14

  As  a  (modern)  cultural  phenomenon,  nations  should  be 



judged  by  their  style  (historical  particularities,  official/popular)  rather  than  their 

truth (fidelity to the authentic original). This allows for an account of the historical 

origins  of  nationalism  in  certain  locations  (Western  Europe,  the  Americas)  and  in 

reaction  to  certain  forces  (colonialism)  without  privileging  these  historical  facts  as 

constitutive of the authentic nationalism.  

The Influence of Benjamin 

How is Anderson’s account of nationalism influenced by Benjam in? The key ways in 

which  Benjamin  has  influenced  Anderson’s  understanding  of  the  origin  and  spread 

of  nationalism  are  in:  (1)  the  importance  afforded  to  print -capitalism;  (2)  the 

linkage  between  ‘homogenous,  empty  time’,  modernity  and  nationalism;  (3)  the  

image of the Angel of History. Alongside this schema, it should be remembered that 

it is Benjamin’s views on materialism, culture and politics in modernity, as a whole, 

that  inspire  Anderson.  Nevertheless,  I  elaborate  on  these  three  notions,  focusing 

heavily  on  print-capitalism,  in  a  way  which  hopefully  also  introduces  and  explains 

the most relevant aspects of Benjamin’s thought. 



Print-capitalism 

Anderson’s  notion  of  ‘print-capitalism’  is  inspired  by  Benjamin’s  essay  on 



Mechanical  Reproduction.  In  the  1930’s,  Benjamin  opens  that  essay  with  the 

premise  that  he  is  at  a  sufficient  historical  distance  to  reflect  on  the  effect  of  the 

rise of the capitalist mode of production on art. He argues that: 

‘For  the  first  time  in  world  history,  mechanical  reproduction  emancipates  the  work  of  art  from  its 

parasitical dependence on ritual’

15

 



Benjamin  argued  that  before  the  development  and  spread  of  printing  and 

other  technologies  that  allowed  for  reproduction,  art  had  possessed  a  more 

significant  aura.  Aura  is  that  which  is  ‘authentic’;  that  part  of  an  object  which 

cannot be reproducedIn the case of the artistic object, authenticity had its basis in 

ritual and religion.

16

 To explain further the disappearance of aura, Benjamin argues 



that  there  are  two  poles  that  art  can  tend  to:  on  the  one  hand  there  is  the  cult, 

where the art is rarely seen (for example, a religious statue that is mostly kept from 

public  view),  while  on  the  other  hand  there  is  the  exhibition  (in  which  the  public 

are  encouraged  to  view  the  art  as  much  as  possible).

17

  Mechanical  reproduction 



                                                           

14

 Andrew Parker, "Bogeyman: Benedict Anderson's "Derivative" Discourse," Diacritics 29, no. 4 (1999)., 43. 



15

 Benjamin, Illuminations., 226. 

16

 Ibid., 226.  



17

 Ibid., 227. 




 

favours  the  latter  pole  significantly,  to  the  extent  that,  for  Benjamin,  the  quantity 



of the shift becomes qualitative.

18

  



Mechanical reproduction, in favouring this latter (“exhibitory”) pole, changes 

the  relationship  between  author  and  public,  reducing  the  earlier  divide  between 

the  two  that  was  based  on  the  genius  or  creativity  of  the  author.  With  high 

circulations  and  publicity  of  modern  forms  of  art,  there  are  more  readers  than 

before,  and  more  of  them,  in  turn,  can  become  engaged  as  writers  (I  will  explain 

later how this claim is important for Anderson).

19

 In the absence of (religious) aura, 



these  new  mass-produced  mediums  would  serve  a  (secular)  political  purpose:  they 

would  foster  a  Communist  collective  subjectivity.  Benjamin  concedes  that  an 

alternative  course  is  presented  by  Fascism,

20

  which  seeks  to  ‘organise  the  newly 



created  proletarian  masses  without  affecting  the  property  structure  which  the 

masses  strive  to  eliminate’.  Fascism  does  this  by  allowing  the  masses  ‘e xpression’ 

rather  than  their  ‘right’  through  the  aestheticisation  of  politics  (as  opposed  to  the 

politicisation  of  art);  for  Benjamin,  the  artistic  glorification  of  war  and  military 

technology is an important example.

21

  



What does Anderson take from these ideas? For Benjamin, the development 

of  ‘print  is  merely  a  special,  though  particularly  important,  case’  of  mechanical 

reproduction, but one which is not as significant as film

22

, Anderson, though, wants 



to  refocus  the  attention  on  print.  This  is  because  while  Benjamin  seems  to  view 

meaningful  levels  of  mechanical  reproduction  as  coinciding  with  the  emergence  of 



industrial capitalism, Anderson’s holds that mechanical reproduction was significant 

much  earlier.

23

  Anderson  states  that  ‘at  least  20,000,000  books  had  already  been 



printed  by  1500’  and  so  the  age  of  mechanical  reproduction  had  begun  by  that 

time.


24

  Essentially,  Anderson  takes  the  general  trends  that  Benjamin  attributes  to 

industrial capitalism’s  effect on art, and applies it to the impact of print -capitalism 

on an earlier cultural world of holy languages and imagined religious communities.   

                                                           

18

 The idea of a qualitative changing arising from a quantitative change comes from Hegel and Marx. Another 



example is when the quantity of private property becomes significant it marks a qualitative change in power 

relations.  

19

 Benjamin, Illuminations., 234. More clearly in Reflections, trans. Edmund Jephcott (New York: Schocken 



Books, 2007)., 225. 

20

 Lunn (and others) have noted that while Benjamin is optimistic in this essay, he was deeply pessimistic 



elsewhere about the same set of circumstances. His concerns about Fascism are perhaps a hint of this 

pessimism. Eugene Lunn, Marxism and Modernism (University of California Press, 1982)., 255. 

21

 Benjamin, Illuminations., 243. 



22

 Ibid., 220. But see Reflections., 225. 

23

 Critics of Benjamin pointed out that mechanical reproduction had been around much longer than industrial 



capitalism. Anderson is therefore justified in shifting the focus from linking impacts of industrialism on culture 

and politics to the impact of a pre-industrial/non-industrial capitalism on culture. It is likely, given his brother’s 

involvement in Verso/New Left Review, that Benedict Anderson is aware of such criticisms. See Theodor; 

Benjamin Adorno, Walter; Bloch, Ernst; Brecht, Bertolt; Lukacs, Georg, Aesthetics and Politics (Verso, 2007).,  

108 n5. See also Marc Redfield, "Imagi-Nation: The Imagined Community and the Aesthetics of Mourning," 

Diacritics 29, no. 4 (1999)., 64 n11. 

24

 Anderson, Imagined Communities : Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism., 37. 




Anderson  agrees  that  mechanical  reproduction  undermines  the  aura  of 

cultural  objects  and  therefore  has  potential  political  impact  (through  changed 

consciousness/subjectivity). However, given his own starting points, he finds that it 

is  not  the  specific  political  impact  that  Benjamin  had  predicted.

25

  Rather  than 



serving  communism  by  being  a  type  of  the  self-destructive  tendency  of  capitalism 

that  Marx  had  pointed  to,  the  loss  of  ‘aura’  of  religious  world-views  caused  by 

print-capitalism  made  a  national  consciousness  possible.  Anderson  explains  (Marx 

and)  Benjamin’s  miscalculation  thus:  ‘whatever  superhuman  feats  capitalism  was 

capable  of,  it  found  in  death  and  languages  two  tenacious  adversaries’.

26

  What 



Anderson means is that firstly, capitalism has not destroyed our desire, traditionally 

religious,  to  moralise  death,  and  secondly,  capitalism  has  yet  to  eliminate  global 

linguistic  diversity,  which  continues  to  provide  a  grounding  for  territorially  limited 

imaginings. In this way, nationalism is a cultural product of capitalism (but not only 

capitalism!),  which  in  some  ways  has  replaced  religion  (as  a  secular  moralising  of 

death  tied  to  linguistic  diversity).  Nevertheless,  Benjamin  correctly  pointed  to  the 

impact  of  mechanical  reproduction  on  cultural  objects  and,  in  turn,  the  impact  in 

such a context of culture on politics. 

Anderson’s  theory  about  the  worldwide  spread  of  nationalism  also  relies  on 

Mechanical  Reproduction.  Since  the  idea  of  the  nation  circulates  globally,  there  is 

no  “authentic”  nationalism.  This  idea  that  nationalism  is  modular  or  a  series  of 

replicas without an original, mirrors, to some extent, Benjamin’s hope that readers 

or  viewers  of  mass  produced  art  would  increasingly  become  “writers”  (of  nations 

for Anderson, of Communism for Benjamin).

27

 Anderson’s view of the State (per his 



distinction  between  bound  and  unbound  seriality)  and  its  potential  to  co -opt 

nationalism  seems  also  to  mirror the  concern  of  Benjamin  that  mass-produced  and 

circulated  art  could  lead  to  Communism  (meaning  genuine  participation  of  the 

workers) or Fascism (a State-sponsored spectacle of participation).   



Homogenous, empty time 

The  concept  of  homogenous,  empty  time  that  Anderson  uses  to  distinguish 

cosmological and modern imaginaries comes from Benjamin’s  History

‘History is the subject of a structure whose site is not homogenous, empty time, but time filled by the 

presence of the now [Jetztzeit].’

28

 



History  offers  a  more  pessimistic  outlook  on  modernity  than  Mechanical 

Reproduction  and  we  gain  more  of  an  understanding  of  both  Benjamin  and 

                                                           

25

 In fairness to Benjamin, his references to Fascism suggest he was not blindly optimistic or set in his 



predictions. 

26

 Anderson, Imagined Communities : Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism., 43. 



27

 Just as Benjamin had, with the benefit of hindsight, sought to critique the “liberal progressive” elements of 

Marxian thought, Anderson, looking back at Benjamin, could see Benjamin was overly optimistic (even taking 

into account his ambivalence elsewhere) about the link between international Communism and mass art.  

28

 Benjamin, Illuminations., 261. 




 

Anderson  from  considering  it.



29

  In  History,  Benjamin  suggests  that  homogenous, 

empty  time  is  the  time  of  capitalism  where  one  moment  is  equal  to  and  regularly 

follows  the  next  (basically,  clock  time).

30

  Our  cultural  common  sense  under 



capitalism  is  attuned  to  experience  the  world  through  this  sense  of  time.  It  can  be 

contrasted  with  a  cosmological  sense  of  time  in  which  time  is  experienced  as 

passing  between  important  events.  For  Benjamin,  a  real  sense  of  history  does  not 

see  all  moments  as  equal  (revolutionary  moments,  are  more  important,  for 

example).

31

  In  History,  Benjamin  establishes  this  distinction  to  critique  the  idea  of 



historical  progress  held  by  the  Left

32

,  as  he  sees  it  as  opening  the  door  to  Fascist 



technocracy. According to Lunn, Benjamin sought to reduce the remnants of liberal 

progressivism  latent  in  Marx,  replacing  it  with  a  ‘hope  in  th e  past’

33

,  or  in 



Benjamin’s  own  words,  rather  than  being  future-oriented  and  motivated:  ‘our 

image of happiness is indissolubly bound up with the image of redemption’.

34

  

Anderson  puts  the  notion  of  the  empty  time  of  modernity  to  his  own  use.  



The nation is an imaginary possibility that was embedded in the experience of time 

as homogenous and empty that was not accounted for by Marxist theory, including 

by Benjamin.

35

 Benjamin never located nationalism in the category of cultural ideas 



alongside  the  idea  of  “progress”.  Anderson  does;  and  following  from  this  re-

categorisation,  he  argues  that  the  imagining  of  events  as  taking  place 

simultaneously  in  time,  rather  than  allegorically  (as  part  of  a  cosmological 

experience  of  time)  constituted  ‘a  fundamental  change…in  modes  of  apprehending 

the world, which, more than anything else, made it possible to ‘think’ the nation’.

36

 



This  ‘fundamental  change’  was  from  a  consciousness  that  understood  the 

present  as  a  ‘simultaneity  of  past  and  future’  –  ‘something  close  to  what  Benjamin 

calls Messianic time’

37

 to a consciousness that saw time as horizontal, flat, a series 



of  events,  though  one  in  which  different  actors  may  be  doing  different  things.

38

 



                                                           

29

 Eugene Lunn argues that while Mechanical Reproduction was overly optimistic, most of Benjamin’s other 



works were decidedly pessimistic about the future.  Overall, he was ambivalent but critical of vulgar Marxist 

views. See Lunn, Marxism and Modernism., 223. Habermas (and others) consider his views as unsynthesisable, 

see generally Jurgen Habermas, "Consciousness-Raising or Redemptive Criticism: The Contemporaneity of 

Walter Benjamin," New German Critique 17 (1979).  

30

 Benjamin, Illuminations., 258-261. 



31

 Ibid., 261-2. 

32

 His critique is directed at the German Social Democrats. Ibid., 260. 



33

 Lunn, Marxism and Modernism., 228. This position made Benjamin more like an anarchistic Nietzsche; this is 

something of a return to his intellectual roots.  

34

 Benjamin, Illuminations., 254 and 260. 



35

 This is why Anderson quotes Tom Nairn, ‘The theory of nationalism represents Marxism’s great historical 

failure’, at the beginning of Imagined Communities. Anderson, Imagined Communities : Reflections on the 

Origin and Spread of Nationalism., 3. 

36

 Ibid., 22.  



37

 Ibid., 24. 

38

 Here Anderson is also drawing heavily on Eric Auerbach. His unreferenced example of the importance of 



‘meanwhile’ in modern as opposed to mediaeval literature – and the concomitant consciousness of each, is 

from Erich Auerbach, Mimesis, trans. William Trask (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013)., 180.  




Simultaneity  of  events  moves  from  being  seen  as  prefiguration  and  fulfilment  to  a 

temporal  coincidence.  The  formal  features  of  the  novel  and  newspaper,  two  key 

print  commodities,  promoted  a  sense  of  flat,  progressive  time.  Thus,  they 

contributed to the breakdown of cosmological imaginings. In contrast to Benjamin’s 

pessimism  towards  the  “progress”  of  homogenous,  empty  time,  Anderson  finds  a 

silver lining in its facilitation of the imagining of egalitarian communities.   



The Angel of History 

The  metaphor  of  the  Angel  of  History  also  comes  from  Benjamin’s  History

Anderson quotes the ninth theses in closing Imagined Communities, and also begins 

with a quote from it in the most recent introduction to  Imagined Communities.

39

 As 


has  been  alluded  to  already,  Benjamin  turned  to  Messianism  as  a  hope  of 

redeeming the past in the face of homogenous, empty time, while the Angel can be 

understood  as  a  loss  of  that  hope:  it  is  the  idea  of  progress  as  piles  of  ‘wreckage 

upon  wreckage’.

40

  In  choosing  to  conclude  with  the  Angel,  Anderson  suggests  he  is 



more  pessimistic  than  Benjamin,  or,  at  least,  does  not  endorse  Messianism  in  the 

same way. From the ‘wreckage’, he salvages nationalism. In the following sections I 

further consider, in light of criticisms of Anderson, the way in which the use of the 

Angel reveals that Anderson’s stance towards Benjamin, and to nationalism, is more 

subtle than some critics would have it, and perhaps what this initial explanation can 

suggest. 



Criticisms of Anderson 

I  now  consider  two  criticisms  of  Anderson  that  relate  to  his  reading  of  Benjamin. 

The  first  criticism  is  that  Anderson  sometimes  stretches  the  application  of 

Benjamin’s  views  on  aura  (namely,  that  when  cultural  objects  are  mass  produced 

and  circulated,  they  lose  aura,  or,  authenticity)  too  far  in  explaining  both  the 

spread  of  nationalism  and  the  maintenance  of  contemporary  nationalism  through 

bound  and  unbound  serialities.

41

  For  Redfield,  Anderson’s  use  of  this  idea  too 



strongly  juxtaposes  a  lack  of  aura  in  late  official  nationalisms  with  a  “genuine” 

popular  imaginary.

42

  He  believes  that  overstating  the  aura-less  nature  of  official 



                                                           

39

 Anderson, Imagined Communities : Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism., xi and 161-2. ‘His 



face is turned towards the past. Where we perceive a chain of events, he sees one single catastrophe which 

keeps piling wreckage upon wreckage and hurls it in front of his feet. The angel would like to stay, awaken the 

dead, and make whole what has been smashed. But a storm is blowing from Paradise; it has got caught in his 

wings with such violence that the angel can no longer close them. This storm irresistibly propels him into the 

future to which his back is turned, while the pile of debris before him grows skyward. This storm is what we 

call progress.’, Benjamin, Illuminations., 257-8. 

40

 John Kelly, "Time and the Global: Against the Homogenous, Empty Communities in Contemporary Social 



Theory," Development and Change 29 (1998)., 847. 

41

 I agree with Harootunian that while Anderson has used other metaphors to explain the manner in which nationalism 



spread (telescope, spectre of comparison) they amount to much the same thing as the circulation of copies reducing the aura 

of the original. H.D. Harootunian, "Ghostly Comparisons: Anderson's Telescope," Diacritics 29, no. 4 (1999)., 140. 

42

 Marc Redfield, "Imagi-Nation: The Imagined Community and the Aesthetics of Mourning," ibid., 72. 




 

nationalist cultural objects does not do justice to the ambiva lent relations between 



nation,  State  and  modernity.  Redfield  does  not  appear  to  have  read  Language  and 

Power  in  which  Anderson  propounds  his  view  on  the  nation  and  State  as  discrete 

but  intertwined,  suggesting  that  Anderson  would  also  accept  a  level  of 

“ambivalence”.

43

  Nevertheless,  Redfield  may  also  be  right  that  Anderson  at  times 



pushes the explanatory power of aura to its limits, perhaps like Benjamin himself.

44

  



A  second,  more  sustained  criticism  focuses  on  Anderson’s  linking  of  homogenous, 

empty time to nationalism.

45

 Kelly, for example, argues that while Anderson begins 



with  a  critical  stance  towards  nationalism,  he  ends  by  linking  the  nation  intimately 

with  modernity.

46

  Greater  emphasis  on  Messianic  time,  since  it  ruptures 



homogenous,  empty  time  and  what  is  imagined  in  it,  is  needed  in  contrast  to  what 

is  taken  to  be  Anderson’s  overly  positive  stance  towards  the  nation.  Kelly  believes 

that  Anderson’s  decision  to  drop  Benjamin’s  Messianism  (against  the  nation)  plays 

into  the  hands  of  the  status  quo  -  the  ‘fictional  global  genealogy  of  American 

geopolitics’.

47

  



Chatterjee  extends  similar  concerns  to  the  notions  of  bound  and  unbound 

seriality, and therefore, to Anderson’s hopes (‘utopian’ according to Chatterjee) for 

popular  nationalism  against  official  nationalism.

48

  Chatterjee  argues  that  the  real 



time  of  modernity  is  heterotopic  and  combines  local  particularities  (customs, 

ethnicity) with global capitalism and its utopian time (the imaginary time of capital 

that  makes  markets,  prices  and  nations  possible).

49

  The  real,  those  customs  and 



ethnicities,  is  linked  by  Anderson  to  bound  seriality.  Chatterjee  believes  that 

Anderson’s  views  stem  from  his  one  sided  view  of  modernity,  one  which 

emphasises the dominance of homogenous, empty time.

50

  



                                                           

43

 The fact that not many commentators on Imagined Communities read this volume is also noted in Pheng 



Cheah, "Grounds of Comparison," ibid., 4 n1. Anderson, Language and Power : Exploring Political Cultures in 

Indonesia., 95-7. 

44

 Anderson is most probably aware, and takes account, of criticisms of Benjamin’s Mechanical Reproduction 



essay such as those found in Aesthetics and Politics. However, he may not have addressed all of them. Adorno, 

Aesthetics and Politics., 106-8. Lunn argues that both Adorno and Benjamin had a tendency to see aesthetic 

theory as easily generalisable; perhaps this applies to Anderson also. Lunn, Marxism and Modernism., 140. 

45

 In a longer essay I would elaborate how the first criticism and second criticism are complementary and 



overlap to some extent.  

46

 For a useful definition of modernity see Matei Calinescu, Five Faces of Modernity (Durham: Duke University 



Press, 1987)., 42-4. 

47

 Kelly, "Time and the Global: Against the Homogenous, Empty Communities in Contemporary Social Theory.", 



868. Kelly also believes a realist take on nationalism – the nation as collective will to power. This is not 

particularly related to Benjamin, however. In contrast, Redfield sees Anderson as part of a Romantic tradition 

that sees the nation as willed: Redfield, "Imagi-Nation: The Imagined Community and the Aesthetics of 

Mourning.", 65. 

48

 Partha Chatterjee, "Anderson's Utopia," ibid., 130. 



49

 See generally ibid. 

50

 Ibid., 131. 




In  the  same  collection  of  essays,  Harootunian  is  sceptical  of  Chatterjee’s 

claims  (and  we  can  extend  this  scepticism  to  Kelly).

51

    Chatterjee  misreads 



‘Anderson’s view of the role played by capitalism in the serial spread of nationalism 

and  modernity’,  by  assuming  identity  between  capitalism  and  modernity.

52

 

However,  as  Anderson  stresses,  death  and  linguistic  diversity  cannot  be  subsumed 



by  capitalism  but  are  part  of  the  cultural  imaginary  of  modernity.  Chatterjee 

misunderstands  or  does  not  engage  clearly  with  this  point,  only  remaining  hopeful 

that  capitalism  will  undercut  postcolonial  nationalism,  making  room  for  an 

“authentic”  alternative.  However,  capitalism  destroys  authenticity  but  has  also 

allowed  for  the  ‘spectre  of  comparisons’  in  which  anticolonial  nationalism 

emerged.


53

  

Anderson  himself  offers  something  of  a  response  to  Chatterjee  and  Kelly, 



implicitly,  with  Under  Three  Flags.  I  believe  this  text  provides  something  of  a 

counterpoint  to  his  decision  to  place  the  Angel  of  History  at  the  end  of  Imagined 



Communities  (therefore  it  goes  against  both  the  interpretation  I  have  mostly 

followed  until  now  and  to  which  critics  such  as  Kelly  responded  to).  Anderson 

introduces  the  text  as  ‘political  astronomy’  aiming  to  make  connections  between 

various  anti-colonial  nationalisms  and  European  anarchism  of  the  belle  epoque.

54

 

This  is  a  cosmological  approach,  demonstrating  Anderson’s  willingness  to  engage 



with  the  Benjamin  of  History.  But  further,  this  cosmology  is  presented  as  a 

prefiguring of our own time: in our contemporary era of globalisation, according to 

Anderson,  anarchism  is  again  dominant  on  the  Left.

55

  The  title  of  the  text  makes 



clear  that  Anderson,  while  critical  of  some  anti-nationalist  cosmopolitans

56

  is  not 



uncosmopolitan; one can be sympathetic to multiple flags (anarchism, nationalism). 

Against  Kelly  and  Chatterjee,  Anderson  makes  clear  that  he  is  not  adverse  to  non -

nationalist  politics  as  they  seem  to  think,  but  rather  is  suspicious  of  the  State  and 

governmentality

57

  and  is  willing  to  make  use  of  Benjaminian  cosmological 



‘redemptive criticism’

58

 in the process. The real line of cleavage that remains, then, 



is  not  about  whether  Anderson  discards  Benjamin’s  Messianism  or  even  about 

nationalism but on the nature and (Left) political usefulness of the State.

59

  

 



                                                           

51

 H.D. Harootunian, "Ghostly Comparisons: Anderson's Telescope," ibid. See also Andrew Parker, "Bogeyman: 



Benedict Anderson's "Derivative" Discourse," ibid. 

52

 H.D. Harootunian, "Ghostly Comparisons: Anderson's Telescope," ibid., 141. 



53

 Ibid., 141-144. 

54

 Anderson, Under Three Flags : Anarchism and the Anti-Colonial Imagination., 1-2 and 5. 



55

 ‘It remains only to say that if readers find in this text a number of parallels and resonances with our own 

time, they will not be mistaken’. Ibid., 7-8.   

56

 The Spectre of Comparisons : Nationalism, Southeast Asia, and the World., 29. 



57

 See Lunn n31 above regarding Benjamin’s own anarchistic tendencies.  

58

 I take this phrase from Habermas, "Consciousness-Raising or Redemptive Criticism: The Contemporaneity of 



Walter Benjamin." 

59

 Anderson seems to be aware of Benjamin’s own anarchistic outlook, perhaps more than the critics. 




11 

 

Conclusion 

In  formulating  his  theory  of  nationalism,  Anderson  remains  remarkably  true  to  the 

spirit of the two texts by Benjamin that I have focused on in this essay:  Mechanical 



Reproduction  and  History.  Anderson  shares  a  materialist  and  modernist  outlook 

with  Benjamin  in  which  capitalism  destroys  religious  imagin aries  (or  aura)  and 

allows  for  new  cultural  meaning.  The  “optimistic”  Benjamin  was  hopeful  that  new 

cultural  meaning  would  be  of  political  significance  (for  Communism).  Analytically, 

Anderson  sides  more  with  this  Benjamin,  albeit  moving  the  analysis  to  pre -

industrial  print-capitalism.  As  a  result  of  this  shift  in  focus,  Anderson  sees 

nationalism  (rather  than  Communism),  as  a  cultural  product  of  fatality  (death, 

language),  capitalism  and  technology,  which  comes  to  be  of  political  significance. 

Meanwhile,  the  “pessimistic”  Benjamin  was  aware  that  the  processes  allowing  for 

his  optimistic  view  of  mechanical  reproduction  were  undercutting  the  thrust  of 

Communism through the cultural idea of progress. Kelly comments that ‘the nation 

first  commands  Anderson’s  attention  as  the  killer  of  a  utopian  political  aesthetic 

[Communism]’  and  reveals  this  utopia  as  fantasy.

60

  In  a  sense,  while  Anderson 



shares  less  outward  affinity  with  the  “pessimistic”  Benjamin,  his  starting  point  is 

the  same.  Benjamin  offered  redemptive  criticism  as  a  way  out  of  the  idea  of 

progress.  Anderson,  while  certainly  eliciting  a  preference  for  the  Angel  of  History 

over  Messianism,  does  not  ignore  this  option  of  redemptive  criticism  as  much  as 

some critics would have it.  

References 

Adorno, Theodor; Benjamin, Walter; Bloch, Ernst; Brecht, Bertolt; Lukacs, Georg. Aesthetics and 



Politics. Verso, 2007. 

Anderson, Benedict R. O'G. Imagined Communities : Reflections on the Origin and Spread of 



Nationalism. edited by Societies American Council of Learned. Rev. ed. ed.  London 

New York: London 

New York : Verso, 2006. 

———. Language and Power : Exploring Political Cultures in Indonesia.  Ithaca, N.Y.: Ithaca, N.Y. : 

Cornell University Press, 1990. 

———. The Spectre of Comparisons : Nationalism, Southeast Asia, and the World.  New York 

London: New York 

London : Verso, 1998. 

———. Under Three Flags : Anarchism and the Anti-Colonial Imagination. Anarchism and the Anti-

Colonial Imagination.  New York, NY: New York, NY : Verso, 2005. 

Auerbach, Erich. Mimesis. Translated by William Trask.  Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013. 

Benjamin, Walter. Illuminations. Schocken Books, 2007. 

                                                           

60

 Kelly, "Time and the Global: Against the Homogenous, Empty Communities in Contemporary Social Theory.", 



847. 


———. Reflections. Translated by Edmund Jephcott.  New York: Schocken Books, 2007. 

Calinescu, Matei. Five Faces of Modernity.  Durham: Duke University Press, 1987. 

Chatterjee, Partha. "Anderson's Utopia." Diacritics 29, no. 4 (1999). 

Cheah, Pheng. "Grounds of Comparison." Diacritics 29, no. 4 (1999): 2-18. 

Habermas, Jurgen. "Consciousness-Raising or Redemptive Criticism: The Contemporaneity of Walter 

Benjamin." New German Critique 17 (1979): 30-59. 

Harootunian, H.D. "Ghostly Comparisons: Anderson's Telescope." Diacritics 29, no. 4 (1999): 135-49. 

Kelly, John. "Time and the Global: Against the Homogenous, Empty Communities in Contemporary 

Social Theory." Development and Change 29 (1998): 839-71. 

Lunn, Eugene. Marxism and Modernism. University of California Press, 1982. 

Parker, Andrew. "Bogeyman: Benedict Anderson's "Derivative" Discourse." Diacritics 29, no. 4 

(1999): 40-57. 

Redfield, Marc. "Imagi-Nation: The Imagined Community and the Aesthetics of Mourning." Diacritics 

29, no. 4 (1999): 58-83. 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 


Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə