The life of pico della mirandola



Yüklə 0.85 Mb.

səhifə1/32
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü0.85 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   32


 

 

THE LIFE OF PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA 

By his Nephew  



Giovanni Pico Della Mirandola

 

 

Translated by  



Thomas More 

 

Edited with introduction and notes by 



J. M. Rigg 

 

With an introductory essay by  



Walter Pater 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Published by the Ex-classics Project, 2011 

http://www.exclassics.com 

Public Domain 

 



PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA 

-2- 


CONTENTS 

 

Bibliographic Note .................................................................................................... 3 



Pico Della Mirandola By Walter Pater....................................................................... 4 

Title Page Of 1890 Edition .......................................................................................12 

Introduction. By J. M. Rigg ......................................................................................13 

The Life Of Pico Della Mirandola ............................................................................31 

Dedication................................................................................................................32 

The Life Of Giovanni Pico, Earl Of Mirandola. ........................................................33 

Three Letters Written By Pico Della Mirandola........................................................45 

The Interpretation Of Giovanni Pico Upon This Psalm Conserva Me Domine. .........54 

Pico's Twelve Rules .................................................................................................59 

Pico's Twelve Weapons Of Spiritual Battle...............................................................64 

Pico's Twelve Properties Or Conditions Of A Lover.................................................68 

A Prayer Of Pico Mirandola Unto God. ....................................................................74 

Notes........................................................................................................................77 



THOMAS MORE et al. 

 

-3- 



Bibliographic Note 

 

 



The  Life  of  Pico  Della  Mirandola

  was  originally  written  in  Latin  by  his 

nephew Giovanni Pico della Mirandola and translated into English by Thomas More 

in  1504.    This  Ex-Classics  version  is  taken  from  an  edition  edited  with  introduction 

and  notes  by  J.  M.  Rigg,  published  by  David  Nutt  in  1890.  The  spelling  has  been 

modernised. 

 

The essay by Walter Pater is from The Renaissance: Studies in Art and Poetry 



(1873). 

 



PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA 

-4- 


 

 

PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA 



By 

Walter Pater 

 

No  account  of  the  Renaissance  can  be  complete  without  some  notice  of  the 



attempt  made  by  certain  Italian  scholars  of  the  fifteenth  century  to  reconcile 

Christianity  with  the  religion  of  ancient  Greece.  To  reconcile  forms  of  sentiment 

which  at  first  sight  seem  incompatible,  to  adjust  the  various  products  of  the  human 

mind  to  each  other  in  one  many-sided  type of intellectual culture, to give humanity, 

for heart and imagination to feed upon, as much as it could possibly receive, belonged 

to the generous instincts of that age. An earlier and simpler generation had seen in the 

gods of Greece so many malignant spirits, the defeated but still living centres of the 

religion  of  darkness,  struggling,  not  always  in  vain,  against  the  kingdom  of  light. 

Little  by  little,  as  the  natural  charm  of  pagan  story  reasserted  itself  over  minds 

emerging  out  of  barbarism,  the  religious  significance  which  had  once  belonged  to it 

was  lost  sight  of,  and  it  came  to  be  regarded  as  the  subject  of  a  purely  artistic  or 

poetical  treatment.  But  it  was  inevitable  that  from  time  to  time  minds  should  arise, 

deeply  enough  impressed  by  its  beauty  and  power  to  ask  themselves  whether  the 

religion of Greece was indeed a rival of the religion of Christ; for the older gods had 

rehabilitated themselves, and men's allegiance was divided. And the fifteenth century 

was an impassioned age, so ardent and serious in its pursuit of art that it consecrated 

everything with which art had to do as a religious object. The restored Greek literature 

had made it familiar, at least in Plato, with a style of expression concerning the earlier 

gods, which had about it much of the warmth and unction of a Christian hymn. It was 

too familiar with such language to regard mythology as a mere story; and it was too 

serious to play with a religion. 

 

"Let me briefly remind the reader"--says Heine, in the Gods in Exile, an essay 



full  of  that  strange  blending  of  sentiment  which  is  characteristic  of  the  traditions  of 

the middle age concerning the pagan religions--"how the gods of the older world, at 

the time of the definite triumph of Christianity, that is, in the third century, fell into 

painful  embarrassments,  which  greatly  resembled  certain  tragical  situations  of  their 

earlier life. They now found themselves beset by the same troublesome necessities to 

which  they  had  once  before  been  exposed  during  the  primitive  ages,  in  that 

revolutionary  epoch  when  the  Titans  broke  out  of  the  custody  of  Orcus,  and,  piling 

Pelion  on  Ossa,  scaled  Olympus.  Unfortunate  Gods!  They  had  then  to  take  flight 

ignominiously,  and  hide  themselves  among  us  here  on  earth,  under  all  sorts  of 

disguises. The larger number betook themselves to Egypt, where for greater security 

they assumed the forms of animals, as is generally known. Just in the same way, they 

had to take flight again, and seek entertainment in remote hiding-places, when those 

iconoclastic  zealots,  the  black  brood  of  monks,  broke  down  all  the  temples,  and 

pursued  the  gods  with  fire  and  curses.  Many  of  these  unfortunate  emigrants,  now 

entirely deprived of shelter and ambrosia, must needs take to vulgar handicrafts, as a 

means of earning their bread. Under these circumstances, many whose sacred groves 

had  been  confiscated,  let  themselves  out  for  hire  as  wood-cutters  in  Germany,  and 

were forced to drink beer instead of nectar. Apollo seems to have been content to take 






Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   32


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə