The life of pico della mirandola



Yüklə 0,85 Mb.

səhifə15/32
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü0,85 Mb.
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   ...   32

PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA 

-34- 


a  noble  stock,[3]  his  father  hight  Giovanni  Francesco,  a  lord  of  great  honour  and 

authority. 

 

OF THE WONDER THAT APPEARED BEFORE HIS BIRTH. 

 

A  marvellous  sight  was  there  seen  before  his  birth:  there  appeared  a  fiery 



garland  standing  over  the  chamber  of  his  mother  while  she  travailed  &  suddenly 

vanished away: which appearance was peradventure a token that he which should that 

hour in the company of mortal men be born in the perfection of understanding should 

be like the perfect figure of that round circle or garland: and that his excellent name 

should round about the circle of this whole world be magnified, whose mind should 

alway as the fire aspire upward to heavenly things, and whose fiery eloquence should 

with  an  ardent  heart  in  time  to  come  worship  and  praise  almighty  God  with  all  his 

strength: and as that flame suddenly vanished so should this fire soon from the eyes of 

mortal people be hid. We have oftentimes read that such unknown and strange tokens 

hath  gone  before  or  followeth  the  nativities  of  excellent  wise  and  virtuous  men, 

departing (as it were) and by God's commandment severing the cradles of such special 

children  from  the  company  of  other  of  the  common  sort:  and  showing  that  they  be 

born  to  the  achieving  of  some  great  thing.  But  to  pass  over  other.  The  great  Saint 

Ambrose: a swarm of bees flew about his mouth in his cradle, & some entered into his 

mouth,  and  after  that  issuing  out  again  and  flying  up  on  high,  hiding  themselves 

among  the  clouds,  escaped  both  the  sight  of  his  father  and  of  all  them  that  were 

present:  which  prognostication  one  Paulinus[4]  making  much  of,  expounded  it  to 

signify  to  us  the  sweet  honeycombs  of  his  pleasant  writing:  which  should  show  out 

the celestial gifts of God & should lift up the mind of men from earth into heaven. 

 

OF HIS PERSON. 

 

He was of feature and shape seemly and beauteous, of stature goodly and high, 



of flesh tender and soft: his visage lovely and fair, his colour white intermingled with 

comely  ruddies,  his  eyes  grey  and  quick  of  look,  his  teeth  white  and  even,  his  hair 

yellow and not to piked.[5] 

 

OF HIS SETTING FORTH TO SCHOOL AND STUDY IN HUMANITY. 

 

Under  the  rule  and  governance  of  his  mother  he  was  set  to  masters  &  to 



learning: where with so ardent mind he laboured the studies of humanity: that within 

short while he was (and not without a cause) accounted among the chief Orators and 

Poets of that time: in learning marvellously swift and of so ready a wit, that the verses 

which  he  heard  once  read  he  would  again  both  forward  and  backward  to  the  great 

wonder  of  the  hearers  rehearse,  and  over  that  would  hold  it  in  sure  remembrance: 

which  in  other  folks  wont  commonly  to  happen  contrary.  For  they  that  are  swift  in 

taking  be  oftentimes  slow  in  remembering,  and  they  that  with  more  labour  & 

difficulty receive it more fast & surely hold it. 

 

OF HIS STUDY IN CANON. 

 

 




THOMAS MORE et al. 

 

-35- 



OF HIS STUDY IN PHILOSOPHY & DIVINITY. 

 

After  this  as  a  desirous  ensearcher  of  the  secrets  of  nature  he  left  these 



common  trodden  paths  and gave himself whole to speculation & philosophy as well 

human  as  divine.  For  the  purchasing  whereof  (after  the  manner  of  Plato  and 

Appollonius)[6] he scrupulously sought out all the famous doctors of his time, visiting 

studiously  all  the  universities  and  schools  not  only  through  Italy  but  also  through 

France.  And  so  indefatigable  labour  gave  he  to  those  studies:  that  yet  a  child  and 

beardless  he  was  both  reputed  and  was  in  deed  both  a  perfect  philosopher  and  a 

perfect divine. 

 

OF HIS MIND AND VAINGLORIOUS DISPICIONS OF ROME. 

 

Now  had  he  been  vii.  year  conversant  in  these  studies  when  full  of  pride  & 



desirous of glory and man's praise (for yet was he not kindled in the love of God) he 

went to Rome, and there (coveting to make a show of his cunning: & little considering 

how  great  envy  he  should  raise  against  himself)  ix.  C.  questions  he  proposed,  of 

divers & sundry matters: as well in logic and philosophy as divinity with great study 

picked and sought out as well of the Latin authors as the Greeks: and partly set out of 

the secret mysteries of the Hebrews, Chaldees, & Arabies: and many things drawn out 

of  the  old  obscure  philosophy  of  Pythagoras,  Trimegistus,  and  Orpheus,[7]  &  many 

other  things  strange:  and  to  all  folk  (except  right  few  special  excellent  men)  before 

that day: not unknown only: but also unheard of. All which questions in open places 

(that  they  might  be  to  all  people  the  better  known)  he  fastened  and  set  up,  offering 

also himself to bear the costs of all such as would come hither out of far countries to 

dispute, but through the envy of his malicious enemies (which envy like the fire ever 

draweth  to  the  highest)  he  could  never  bring  about  to  have  a  day  to  his  dispicions 

appointed.  For  this  cause  he  tarried  at  Rome  an  whole  year,  in  all  which  time  his 

enviers never durst openly with open dispicions attempt him, but rather with craft and 

sleight and as it were with privy trenches enforced to undermine him, for none other 

cause but for malice and for they were (as many men thought) corrupt with a pestilent 

envy. 


 

This envy as men deemed was specially raised against him for this cause that 

where  there  were  many  which  had  many  years:  some  for  glory:  some  for  covetise: 

given  themselves  to  learning:  they  thought  that  it  should  haply  deface  their  fame  & 

minish th'opinion of their cunning if so young a man plenteous of substance & great 

doctrine durst in the chief city of the world make a proof of his wit and his learning: 

as  well  in  things  natural  as  in  divinity  &  in  many  such  things  as  men  many  years 

never  attained  to.  Now  when  they  perceived  that  they  could not  against  his  cunning 

any thing openly prevail, they brought forth the serpentines of false crime, and cried 

out that there were xiij. of his ix. C. questions suspect of heresy. Then joined they to 

them some good simple folk that should of zeal to the faith and pretence of religion 

impugn  those  questions  as  new  things  &  with  which  their  ears  had  not  be  in ure. In 

which impugnation though some of them haply lacked not good mind: yet lacked they 

erudition and learning: which questions notwithstanding before that not a few famous 

doctors of divinity had approved as good and clean, and subscribed their names under 

them. But he not bearing the loss of his fame made a defence for those xiij. questions: 

a  work  of  great  erudition  and  elegant  and  stuffed  with  the  cognition  of  many  things 

worthy  to  be  learned.  Which  work  he  compiled  in  xx  nights.  In  which  it  evidently 

appeareth: not only that those conclusions were good and standing with the faith: but 





Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   ...   32


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə