The life of pico della mirandola



Yüklə 0.85 Mb.

səhifə16/32
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü0.85 Mb.
1   ...   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   ...   32

PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA 

-36- 


also  that  they  which  had  barked  at  them  were  of  folly  and  rudeness  to  be  reproved: 

which  defence  and  all  other  things  that  he  should  write  he  committed  like  a  good 

Christian man to the most holy judgement of our mother holy church: which defence 

received:  &  the  xiij.  questions  duly  by  deliberation  examined:  our  holy  father  the 

Pope approved Pico and tenderly favoured him, as by a bull of our holy father Pope 

Alexander  the  vj,  it  plainly  appeareth:  but  the  book  in  which  the  whole.  ix.  C. 

questions  with  their  conclusions  were  contained  (forasmuch  as  there  were  in  them 

many  things  strange  and  not  fully  declared,  and  were  more  meet  for  secret 

communication  of  learned  men  than  for  open  hearing  of  common  people,  which  for 

lack  of  cunning  might  take  hurt  thereby)  Pico  desired  himself  that  it  should  not  be 

read. And so was the reading thereof forbidden. Lo this end had Pico of his high mind 

and proud purpose, that where he thought to have gotten perpetual praise there had he 

much work to keep himself upright: that he ran not in perpetual infamy and slander. 

 

OF THE CHANGE OF HIS LIFE. 

 

But  as  himself  told  his  nephew  he  judged that this came thus to pass: by the 



special  provision  and  singular  goodness  of  almighty  God,  that  by  this  false  crime 

untruly put upon him by his evil willers he should correct his very errors, and that this 

should be to him (wandering in darkness) as a shining light: in which he might behold 

& consider: how far he had gone out of the way of truth. For before this he had been 

both  desirous  of  glory  and  kindled  in  vain  love  and  holden  in  voluptuous  use  of 

women.  The  comeliness  of  his  body  with  the  lovely  favour  of  his  visage,  and 

therewith  all  his  marvellous  fame,  his  excellent  learning,  great  riches  and  noble 

kindred, set many women afire on him, from the desire of whom he not abhorring (the 

way of life set aside) was somewhat fallen into wantonness. But after that he was once 

with  this  variance  wakened  he  drew  back  his  mind  flowing  in  riot  &  turned  it  to 

Christ,  women's  blandishments  he  changed  into  the  desire  of  heavenly  joys,  & 

despising  the  blast  of  vainglory  which  he  before  desired,  now  with  all  his  mind  he 

began  to  seek  the  glory  and  profit  of  Christ's  church,  and  so  began  he  to  order  his 

conditions  that  from  thenceforth  he  might  have  been  approved  &  though  his  enemy 

were his judge. 

 

OF THE FAME OF HIS VIRTUE AND THE RESORT UNTO HIM 



THEREFOR. 

 

Hereupon shortly the fame of his noble cunning and excellent virtue both far 



& nigh began gloriously to spring for which many worthy philosophers (& that were 

taken in number of the most cunning) resorted busily unto him as to a market of good 

doctrine,  some  for  to  move  questions  and  dispute,  some  (that  were  of  more  godly 

mind) to hear and to take the wholesome lessons and instruction of good living: which 

lessons  were  so  much  the  more  set  by:  in  how  much  they  came  from  a  more  noble 

man and a more wise man and him also which had him false some time followed the 

crooked hills of delicious pleasure. To the fastening of good discipline in the minds of 

the hearers those things seem to be of great effect: which be both of their own nature 

good & also be spoken of such a master as is converted to the way of justice from the 

crooked & ragged path of voluptuous  living. 

 

THE BURNING OF WANTON BOOKS. 



THOMAS MORE et al. 

 

-37- 



 

Five books that in his youth of wanton verses of love with other like fantasies 

he had made in his vulgar tongue: all together (in detestation of his vice passed) and 

lest these trifles might be some evil occasion afterward, he burned them. 

 

OF HIS STUDY AND DILIGENCE IN HOLY SCRIPTURE. 

 

From thenceforth he gave himself day & night most fervently to the studies of 



scripture,  in  which  he  wrote  many  noble  books:  which  well  testify  both  his  angelic 

wit,  his  ardent  labour,  and  his  profound  erudition,  of  which  books  some  we  have  & 

some  as  an  inestimable  treasure  we  have  lost.  Great  libraries  it  is  incredible  to 

consider  with  how  marvellous  celerity  he  read  them  over,  and  wrote  out  what  him 

liked: of the old fathers of the church, so great knowledge he had as it were hard for 

him to have that hath lived long & all his life hath done nothing else but read them. Of 

these newer divines so good judgement he had that it might appear there were nothing 

in any of them it were unknown to him, but all thing as ripe as though he had all their 

works  ever  before  his  eyes,  but  of  all  these  new  doctors  he  specially  commendeth 

Saint  Thomas[8]  as  him  it  enforceth  himself  in  a  sure  pillar  of  truth.  He  was  very 

quick, wise, & subtle in dispicions & had great felicity therein while he had the high 

stomach.  But  now  a  great  while  he  had  bade  such  conflicts  farewell:  and  every  day 

more & more hated them, and so greatly abhorred them that when Hercules Estensis 

Duke of Ferrara[9]: first by messengers and after by himself: desired him to dispute at 

Ferrara: because the general chapter of friars preachers was holden there: long it was 

ere  he  could  be  brought  thereto:  but  at  the  instant  request  of  the  Duke  which  very 

singularly loved him he came thither, where he so behaved himself that was wonder to 

behold how all the audience rejoiced to hear him, for it were not possible for a man to 

utter neither more cunning nor more cunningly. But it was a common saying with him 

that  such  altercations  were  for  a  logician  and  not  meetly  for  a  philosopher,  he  said 

also that such disputations greatly profited as were exercised with a peaceable mind to 

th'ensearching of the truth in secret company without great audience: but he said that 

those dispicions did great hurt that were holden openly to th'ostentation of learning & 

to  win  the  favour  of  the  common  people  &  the  commendation  of  fools.  He  thought 

that utterly it could unneth be but that with the desire of worship (which these gazing 

disputers  gape  after)  there  is  with  an  inseparable  bond  annexed  the  appetite  of  his 

confusion & rebuke whom they argue with, which appetite is a deadly wound to the 

soul, & a mortal poison to charity. There was nothing passed him of those capicious 

subtleties & cavillations of sophistry, nor again there was nothing that he more hated 

& abhorred, considering that they served of nought but to the shaming of such other 

folk  as  were  in  very  science  much  better  learned  and  in  those  trifles  ignorant  and  it 

unto th'ensearching of the truth (to which he gave continual labour) they profited little 

or nought. 

 

OF HIS LEARNING UNIVERSALLY. 

 

But  because  we  will  hold  the  reader  no  longer  in  hand:  we  will  speak  of  his 



learning  but  a  word  or  twain  generally.  Some  man  hath  shined  in  eloquence,  but 

ignorance  of  natural  things  hath  dishonested  him.  Some  man  hath  flowered  in  the 

knowledge  of  divers  strange  languages,  but  he  hath  wanted  all  the  cognition  of 

philosophy.  Some  man  hath  read  the  inventions  of  the old philosophers, but he hath 

not  been  exercised  in  the  new  schools.  Some  man  hath  sought  cunning  as  well 





Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   ...   32


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə