The life of pico della mirandola



Yüklə 0.85 Mb.

səhifə17/32
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü0.85 Mb.
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   ...   32

PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA 

-38- 


philosophy  as  divinity  for  praise  and  vainglory  and  not  for  any  profit  or  increase  of 

Christ's church. But Pico all these things with equal study hath so received that they 

might seem by heaps as a plenteous theme to have flowen into him. For he was not of 

the condition of some folk (which to be excellent in one thing set all other aside) but 

he in all sciences profited so excellently: that which of them soever he had considered, 

in him ye would have thought that he had taken that one for his only study. And all 

these  things  were  in  him  so  much  the  more  marvellous  in  that  he  came  thereto  by 

himself  with  the  strength  of  his  own  wit  for  the  love  of  God  and  profit  his  church 

without masters, so that we may say of him that Epicure the philosopher said of him 

that he was his own master.[10] 

 

FIVE CAUSES THAT IN SO SHORT TIME BROUGHT HIM TO SO 

MARVELLOUS CUNNING. 

 

To the bringing forth of so wonderful effects in so small time I consider five 



causes  to  have  come  together:  first  an  incredible  wit,  secondly  a  marvellous  fast 

memory, thirdly great substance by the which to the buying of his books as well Latin 

as Greek & other tongues he was especially holpen. VIJ.M. ducats he had laid out in 

the gathering together of volumes of all manner of literature. The fourth cause was his 

busy and infatigable study. The fifth was the contempt despising of all earthly  things. 

 

OF HIS CONDITIONS AND HIS VIRTUE. 

 

But  now  let  us  pass  over  those  powers  of  his  soul  which  appertain  to 



understanding  &  knowledge  &  let  us  speak  of  them  that  belong  to  the  achieving  of 

noble acts, let us as we can declare his excellent conditions that his mind inflamed to 

Godward  may  appear,  and  his  riches  given  out  to  poor  folk  may  be  understood, 

th'intent  that  they  which  shall  hear  his  virtue  may  have  occasion  thereby  to  give 

especial  laud  &  thanks  to  almighty  God,  of  whose  infinite  goodness  all  grace  and 

virtue cometh. 

 

OF THE SALE OF HIS LORDSHIPS AND ALMS. 

 

Three year before his death (to th'end that all the charge & business of rule or 



lordship set aside he might lead his life in rest and peace, well considering to what end 

this earthly honour & worldly dignity cometh) all his patrimony and dominions: that 

is to say: the third part of th'earldom of Mirandola and of Concordia: unto Giovanni 

Francesco his nephew he sold, and that so good cheap that it seemed rather a gift than 

a  sale.[11]  All  that  ever  he  received  of  this  bargain  partly  he  gave  out  to  poor  folk, 

partly he bestowed in the buying of a little land, finding of him & his household. And 

over  that:  much  silver  vessel  &  plate  with  other  precious  &  costly  utensils  of 

household he divided among poor people. He was content with mean fare at his table, 

howbeit  somewhat  yet  retaining  of  the  old  plenty  in  dainty  viand  &  silver  vessel. 

Every day at certain hours he gave himself to prayer. To poor men always if any came 

he  plenteously  gave  out  his  money:  &  not  content  only  to  give  that  he  had  himself 

ready:  he  wrote  over  it  to  one  Hierom  Benivenius  [12]  a  Florentine,  a  well  lettered 

man  (whom  for  his  great  love  toward  him  &  the  integrity  of  his  conditions  he 

singularly favoured) that he should with his own money ever help poor folk: & give 

maidens money to their marriage: and alway send him word what he had laid out that 



THOMAS MORE et al. 

 

-39- 



he  might  pay  it  him  again.  This  office  he  committed  to  him  that  he  might  the  more 

easily by him as by a faithful messenger relieve the necessity & misery of poor needy 

people such as himself haply could not come by the knowledge of. 

 

OF THE VOLUNTARY AFFLICTION & PAINING OF HIS OWN BODY. 

 

Over all this: many times (which is not to be kept secret) he gave alms of his 



own body: we know many men which (as Saint Hierom[13] saith) put forth their hand 

to poor folk: but with the pleasure of the flesh they be overcome: but he  many days 

(and  namely[14]  those days which represent unto us the passion & death that Christ 

suffered  for  our  sake)  beat  and  scourged  his  own  flesh  in  the  remembrance  of  that 

great benefit and for cleansing of his old offences. 

 

OF HIS PLACABILITY OR BENIGN NATURE. 

 

He  was  of  cheer  always  merry  &  of  so  benign  nature  that  he  was  never 



troubled with anger & he said once to his nephew that whatsoever should happen (fell 

there never so great misadventure) he could never as him thought be moved to wrath 

but if his chests perished in which his books lay that he had with great travail & watch 

compiled: but forasmuch as he considered that he laboured only for the love of God & 

profit of his church: & that he had dedicate unto him all his works, his studies & his 

doings: & sith he saw that sith God is almighty they could not miscarry but if it were 

either  by  his  commandment  or  by  his  sufferance:  he  verily  trusted:  sith  God  is  all 

good: that he would not suffer him to have that occasion of heaviness. O very happy 

mind which none adversity might oppress, which no prosperity might enhance: not the 

cunning  of  all  philosophy  was  able  to  make  him  proud,  not  the  knowledge  of  the 

Hebrew,  Chaldee  &  Arabic  language  beside  Greek  and  Latin  could  make  him 

vainglorious, not his great substance, not his noble blood, could blow up his heart, not 

the beauty of his body, not the great occasion of sin were able to pull him back into 

the voluptuous broad way that leadeth to hell: what thing was there of so marvellous 

strength that might overturn that mind of him: which now (as Seneca saith) was gotten 

above fortune[15] as he which as well her favour as her malice hath set at nought, that 

he might be coupled with a spiritual knot unto Christ and his heavenly citizens. 

 

HOW HE ESCHEWED DIGNITIES. 

 

When he saw many men with great labour & money desire & busily purchase 



the  offices & dignities of the church (which are nowadays alas the while commonly 

bought & sold) himself refused to receive them when two kings offered them: when 

another man offered him great worldly promotion if he would go to the king's court: 

he gave him such an answer, that he should well know that he neither desired worship 

ne  worldly  riches  but  rather  set  them  at  nought  that  he  might  the  more  quietly  give 

himself to study & the service of God: this wise he persuaded, that to a philosopher 

and him that seeketh for wisdom it was no praise to gather riches but to refuse them. 

 

OF THE DESPISING OF WORLDLY GLORY. 

 

All praise of people and all earthly glory he reputed utterly for nothing: but in 



the  renaying  of  this  shadow  of  glory  he  laboured  for  very  glory  which  ever  more 




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   ...   32


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə