The life of pico della mirandola



Yüklə 0.85 Mb.

səhifə18/32
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü0.85 Mb.
1   ...   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   ...   32

PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA 

-40- 


followeth  virtue  as  an  unseparable  servant.  He  said  that  fame  oftentimes  did  hurt  to 

men  while  they  live,  &  never  good  when  they  be  dead.  So  much  only  set  he  by  his 

learning  in  how  much  he  knew  that  it  was  profitable  to  the  church  &  to  the 

extermination of errors. And over that: he was come to that prick of perfect humility 

that  he  little  forced  whether  his  works  went  out  under  his  own  name  or  not  so  that 

they might as much profit as if they were given out under his name. And now set he 

little  by  any  other  books  save  only  the  Bible,  in  the  only  study  of  which  he  had 

appointed  himself  to  spend  the  residue  of  his  life,  saving  that  the  common  profit 

pricked  him  when  he  considered  so  many  &  so  great  works  as  he  had  conceived  & 

long  travailed  upon  how  they  were  of  every  man  by  and  by[16]  desired  and  looked 

after. 

 

HOW MUCH HE SET MORE BY DEVOTION THAN CUNNING. 



 

The little affection of an old man or an old woman to Godward (were it never 

so small) he set more by: than by all his own knowledge as well of natural things as 

godly. And oftentimes in communication he would admonish his familiar friends how 

greatly these mortal things bow and draw to an end, how slippery & how falling it is 

that  we  live  in  now:  how  firm  how  stable  it  shall  be  that  we  shall  hereafter  live  in, 

whether we be thrown down into hell or lifted up into heaven. Wherefore he exhorted 

them  to  turn  up  their  minds  to  love  God,  which  was  a  thing  far  excelling  all  the 

cunning  it  is  possible  for  us  in  this  life  to  obtain.  The  same  thing  also  in  his  book 

which he entitled "De Ente et Uno" lightsomely he treateth where he interrupteth the 

course  of  his  dispicion  and  turning  his  words  to  Angelo  Politiano  (to  whom  he 

dedicateth  that  book)  he  writeth  in  this  wise.  But  now  behold  O  my  wellbeloved 

Angelo  what  madness  holdeth  us.  Love  God  (while  we  be  in  this  body)  we  rather 

may: than either know him or by speech utter him. In loving him also we more profit 

ourselves, we labour less & serve him more, & yet had we lever alway by knowledge 

never  find  that  thing  that  we  seek:  than  by  love  to  possess  that  thing  which  also 

without love were in vain found.[17] 

 

OF HIS LIBERALITY & CONTEMPT OF RICHES. 

 

Liberality only in him passed measure: for so far was he from the beginning of 



any diligence to earthly things that he seemed somewhat besprent with the freckle of 

negligence.  His  friends  oftentimes  admonished  him  that  he  should  not  all  utterly 

despise  riches,  showing  him  that  it  was  his  dishonesty  and  rebuke  when  it  was 

reported (were it true or false) that his negligence & setting nought by money gave his 

servants occasion of deceit & robbery. Nevertheless that mind of his (which evermore 

on high  cleaved fast in contemplation & in th'ensearching of nature's counsel) could 

never let down itself to the consideration and overseeing of these base abject and vile 

earthly trifles. His high steward came on a time to him & desired him to receive his 

account of such money as he had in many years received of him: and brought forth his 

books of reckoning. Pico answered him in this wise, my friend (saith he) I know well 

ye  have  mought  oftentimes  and  yet  may  deceive  me  an  ye  list,  wherefore  the 

examination of these expenses shall not need. There is no more to do, if I be ought in 

your  debt  I shall pay you by & by,[18] & if ye be in mine pay me: either now if ye 

have it: or hereafter if ye be now not able. 

 



THOMAS MORE et al. 

 

-41- 



OF HIS LOVING MIND & VIRTUOUS BEHAVIOUR TO HIS FRIENDS. 

 

His lovers and friends with great benignity & courtesy he entreated, whom he 



used  in all secret communing virtuously to exhort to Godward, whose goodly words 

so  effectually  wrought  in  the  hearers  that  where  a  cunning  man  (but  not  so  good  as 

cunning)  came  to  him  on  a  day  for  the  great  fame  of  his  learning  to  commune  with 

him,  as  they  fell  in  talking  of  virtue  he  was  with  the  words  of  Pico  so  thoroughly 

pierced that forthwith all he forsook his accustomed vice and reformed his conditions. 

The words that he said unto him were these: if we had evermore before our eyes the 

painful  death  of  Christ  which  he  suffered  for  the  love  of  us:  and  then  if  we  would 

again  think  upon  our  death:  we  should  well  beware  of  sin.  Marvellous  benignity  & 

courtesy  he  showed  unto  them:  not  whom  strength  of  body  or  goods  of  fortune 

magnified  but  to  them  whom  learning  &  conditions  bound  him  to  favour:  for 

similitude of manners is a cause of love & friendship. A likeness of conditions is (as 

Appollonius saith) an affinity.[19] 

 

WHAT HE HATED AND WHAT HE LOVED. 

 

There  was  nothing  more  odious  nor  more  intolerable  to  him  than  as 



(Horace[20]  saith)  the  proud  palaces  of  stately  lords:  wedding  and  worldly  business 

he  fled  almost  alike:  notwithstanding  when  he  was  asked  once  in  sport  whether  of 

those two burdens seemed lighter & which he would choose if he should of necessity 

be  driven  to  that  one  and at his election: which he sticked thereat a while but at the 

last he shook his head and a little smiling he answered that he had lever take him to 

marriage, as that thing in which  was less servitude & not so much jeopardy. Liberty 

above  all  thing  he  loved,  to  which  both  his  own  natural  affection  &  the  study  of 

philosophy  inclined  him:  &  for  that  was  he  always  wandering  &  flyting  &  would 

never take himself to any certain dwelling.[21] 

 

OF HIS FERVENT LOVE TO GOD. 

 

Of  outward  observances  he  gave  no  very  great  force:  we  speak  not  of  those 



observances  which  the  church  commandeth  to  be  observed,  for  in  those  he  was 

diligent:  but  we  speak  of  those  ceremonies  which  folk  bring  up  setting  the  very 

service of God aside, which is (as Christ saith) to be worshipped in spirit & in truth. 

But  in  the  inward  affects  of  the  mind  he  cleaved  to  God  with  very  fervent  love  and 

devotion: some time that marvellous alacrity languished and almost fell, and eft again 

with great strength rose up into God. In the love of whom he so fervently burned that 

on a time as he walked with Giovanni Francesco his nephew in an orchard at Ferrara, 

in the talking of the love of Christ he brake out into these words, nephew, said he, this 

will I show thee, I warn thee keep it secret: the substance that I have left after certain 

books  of  mine  finished  I  intend  to  give  out  to  poor  folk,  &  fencing  myself  with  the 

crucifix,  barefoot  walking  about  the  world,  in  every  town  and  castle  I  purpose  to 

preach  of  Christ.  Afterward  I  understand  by  the  special  commandment  of  God  he 

changed  that  purpose  and  appointed  to  profess  him  self  in  the  order  of  friars 

preachers. 

 

OF HIS DEATH. 





Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   ...   32


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə