The life of pico della mirandola



Yüklə 0.85 Mb.

səhifə20/32
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü0.85 Mb.
1   ...   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   ...   32

PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA 

-44- 


to his acquaintance that Pico had after his death appeared unto him all compassed in 

fire  &  showed  unto  him  that  he  was  such  wise  in  purgatory  punished  for  his 

negligence  &  his  unkindness.  Now  sith  it  is  so  that  he  is  adjudged  to  that  fire  from 

which he shall undoubtedly depart unto glory & no man is sure how long it shall be 

first: & may be the shorter time for our intercessions: let every Christian body show 

their  charity  upon  him  to  help  to  speed  him  thither  where  after  the  long  habitation 

with the inhabitants of this dark world (to whom his goodly conversation gave great 

light) & after the dark fire of purgatory (in which venial offences be cleansed) he may 

shortly (if he be not already) enter the inaccessible & infinite light of heaven; where 

he may in the presence of the sovereign Godhead so pray for us that we may the rather 

by his intercession be partners of that unspeakable joy which we have prayed to bring 

him speedily to. Amen. 

 

Here endeth the life of Giovanni Pico Earl of Mirandola. 

 



THOMAS MORE et al. 

 

-45- 



 

 

Three Letters written by Pico Della Mirandola 

 

Here  followeth  three  epistles  of  the  said  Pico:  of  which  three  two  be  written 



unto Giovanni Francesco his nephew, the third unto one Andrew Corneus a noble man 

of Italy. 

 

THE ARGUMENT & MATTER OF THE FIRST EPISTLE OF PICO UNTO 

HIS NEPHEW GIOVANNI FRANCESCO. 

 

It  appeareth  by  this  epistle  that  Giovanni  Francesco  the  nephew  of  Pico  had 



broken his mind unto Pico and had made him of council in some secret godly purpose 

which he intended to take upon him: but what this purpose should be upon this letter 

can we not fully perceive. Now after that he thus intended, there fell unto him many 

impediments & divers occasions which withstood his intent and in manner letted him 

& pulled him back, wherefore Pico comforteth him in this epistle and exhorteth him to 

perseverance,  by  such  means  as  are  in  the  epistle  evident  and  plain  enough. 

Notwithstanding in the beginning of this letter where he saith that the flesh shall (but 

if we take good heed) make us drunken in the cups of Circe and misshape us into the 

likeness & figure of brute beasts: those words if thee perceive them not be in this wise 

understanden.  There  was  sometime  a  woman  called  Circe  which  by  enchantment  as 

Virgil  maketh  mention  used  with  a  drink  to  turn  as  many  men  as  received  it  into 

divers likeness & figures of sundry beasts, some into lions, some into bears, some into 

swine,  some  into  wolves,  which  afterward  walked  ever  tame  about  her  house  and 

waited  upon  her  in such  use  or  service  as  she  list  to  put  unto them.  In  like  wise the 

flesh if it make us drunk in the wine of voluptuous pleasure or make the soul leave the 

noble use of his reason & incline unto sensuality and affections of the body: then the 

flesh  changeth  us  from  the figure of reasonable men in the likeness of unreasonable 

beasts,  and  that  diversely:  after  the  convenience  &  similitude  between  our  sensual 

affections and the brutish properties of sundry beasts: as the proud hearted man into a 

lion, the irous into a bear, the lecherous into a goat, the drunken glutton into a swine, 

the ravenous extortioner into a wolf, the false deceiver into a fox, mocking jester into 

an  ape.  From  which  beastly  shape  may  we  never  be  restored  to  our  own  likeness 

again: unto the time we have cast up again the drink of the bodily affections by which 

we  were  into  these  figures  enchanted.  When  there  cometh  sometime  a  monstrous 

beast to the town we run and are glad to pay some money to have sight thereof, but I 

fear if men would look upon themselves advisedly: they should see a more monstrous 

beast nearer home: for they should perceive themselves by the wretched inclination to 

divers  beastly  passions  changed  in  their  soul  not  into  the  shape  of  one  but  of  many 

beasts,  that  is  to  say  of  all  them  whose  brutish  appetites  they  follow.  Let  us  then 

beware as Pico councelleth us it we be not drunken in the cups of Circe, that is to say 

in the sensual affections of the flesh, lest we deform the image of God in our souls, 

after  whose  image  we  be  made,  &  make  our  self  worse  than  idolaters,  for  if  he  be 

odious  to  God  which  turneth  the  image  of  a  beast  into  God:  how  much  is  he  more 

odious which turneth the image of God into a beast. 

 



PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA 

-46- 


GIOVANNI PICO EARL OF MIRANDOLA TO GIOVANNI FRANCESCO 

HIS NEPHEW BY HIS BROTHER HEALTH IN HIM THAT IS VERY 

HEALTH. 

 

That thou hast had many evil occasions after thy departing which trouble thee 



&  stand  against  the  virtuous  purpose  that  thou  hast  taken  there  is  no  cause  my  son 

why thou shouldst either marvel thereof, be sorry therefor, or dread it, but rather how 

great a wonder were this if only to thee among mortal men the way lay open to heaven 

without sweat, as though that now at erst the deceitful world & the cursed devil failed, 

&  as  though  thou  were  not  yet  in  the  flesh:  which  coveteth  against  the  spirit:  and 

which false flesh (but if we watch & look well to our self) shall make us drunk in the 

cups of Circe & so deform us into monstrous shapes of brutish & unreasonable beasts. 

Remember  also  that  of  these  evil  occasions  the  holy  apostle  saint  James  saith  thou 

hast  cause  to  be  glad,  writing  in  this  wise.  Gaudete  fratres  quum  in  temptationes 

varias incideritis

. Be glad saith he my brethren when thee fall in divers temptations, 

and not causeless: for what hope is there of glory if there be none hope of victory: or 

what  place  is  there  for  victory  where  there  is  no  battle:  he  is  called  to  the  crown  & 

triumph which is provoked to the conflict & namely to that conflict: in which no man 

may  be  overcome  against  his  will,  &  in  which  we  need  none  other  strength  to 

vanquish but it we list ourselves to vanquish. Very happy is a Christian man sith that 

the  victory  is  both  put  in his  own  free  will:  &  the  reward  of  the  victory  shall  be  far 

greater than we can either hope or wish. Tell me I pray thee my most dear son if there 

be aught in this life of all those things: the delight whereof so vexeth and tosseth these 

earthly  minds. Is there I say one of those trifles: in the getting of which a man must 

not  suffer  many  labours  many  displeasures  &  many  miseries  ere  he  get  it.  The 

merchant  thinketh  himself  well  served  if  after  X  years  sailing,  after  a  m. 

incommodities, after a m. jeopardies of his life he may at last have a little the more 

gathered together. Of the court & service of this world there is nothing that I need to 

write  unto  thee,  the  wretchedness  whereof  the  experience  itself  hath  taught  thee  & 

daily teacheth. In obtaining the favour of the princes, in purchasing the friendship of 

the  company  in  ambitious  labour  for  offices  &  honours  what  an  heap  of  heaviness 

there is: how great anguish: how much business & trouble I may rather learn of thee 

than teach thee, which holding myself content with my books & rest, of a child have 

learned  to  live  within  my degree  &  as  much  as  I  may  dwelling  with  myself nothing 

out  of  myself  labour  for,  or  long  for.  Now  then  these  earthly  things  slippery, 

uncertain,  vile  &  common  also  to  us  and  brute  beast  sweating  &  panting  we  shall 

unneth obtain: and look we then to heavenly things & goodly (which neither eye hath 

seen  nor  ear  hath  heard  nor  heart  hath  thought)  to  be  drawn  slumbery  &  sleeping 

maugre our teeth: as though neither God might reign nor those heavenly citizens live 

without us. Certainly if this worldly felicity were gotten to us with idleness and ease: 

then might some man that shrinketh from labour rather choose to serve the world than 

God. But now if we be so laboured  in the way of sin as much as in the way of God 

and  much  more  (whereof  the  damned  wretches  cry  out:  Lassati  sumus  in  via 



iniquitatis

. We be wearied in the way of wickedness, then must it needs be a point of 

extreme madness if we had not lever labour there where we go from labour to reward 

than where we go from labour to pain. I pass over how great peace & felicity it is to 

the  mind  when  a  man  hath  nothing  that  grudgeth  his  conscience  nor  is not  appalled 

with the secret twitch of any privy crime. This pleasure undoubtedly far excelleth all 

the  pleasures  that  in  this  life  may  be  obtained  or  desired:  what  thing  is  there  to  be 

desired among the delights of this world: which in the seeking weary us, in the having 

blindeth  us,  in  the  losing  paineth  us.  Doubtest  thou  my  son  whether  the  minds  of 





Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   ...   32


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə