The life of pico della mirandola



Yüklə 0,85 Mb.

səhifə31/32
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü0,85 Mb.
1   ...   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32

PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA 

-78- 


 

6.  Apollonius  of  Tyana,  fl.  70  A.D.,  travelled  throughout  the  ancient  world 

expounding Neo-Pythagoreanism, and working wonders, esteemed miraculous. 

 

7.  For  an  account  of  these  spurious  compositions,  written  at  various  dates 



between  the  first  century  before  and  the  third  century  after  Christ,  but  which  were 

universally regarded as genuine in Pico's day, see Zeller, "Philosophie der Griechen." 

 

8. Aquinas. 



 

9. With whom Pico was connected by affinity. See note 2. 

 

10. For this vaunt of Epicurus see Diogenes Lærtius, "Vitæ Philosph.": τουτον 



Απολλοδωρος εν χρονικοις Λυσιφανους ακουσαι φησι και Πραξιφανους αυτος δε ου 

φησιν αλλ εαυτου, εν τη προς Ευρυδικον επιστολη. 

 

11. Pico's conduct in this matter was not altogether so generous as it appears in 



the text. Soon after his father's death his brothers had fallen out about the partition of 

the  family  estates,  and  matters  went  so  far  that  in  1473  Galeotto  surprised  Antonio 

Maria and incarcerated him in the citadel of Mirandola, while he made himself master 

of  the  entire  inheritance,  apparently  ignoring  Pico's  title  altogether.  Antonio  Maria 

remained a close prisoner in Mirandola for about two years, at the close of which he 

was released in deference to the intercessions, or perhaps menaces, of his friends, fled 

to Rome, and appealed to the Pope. He returned in 1483 with a small army furnished 

by the Duke of Calabria, possessed himself of Concordia, and negotiated a treaty of 

partition  with  his  brother.  The  treaty  was,  however,  by  no  means  strictly  observed. 

Pico  had  taken  no  part  in  the  quarrel,  and  was  probably  the  more  ready  to  cede  his 

rights  to  his  nephew  that  any  attempt  to  vindicate  them  for  himself  would  certainly 

have  excited  the  determined  hostility  of  his  brothers.  The  conveyance  was  executed 

on  22  April  1491.  "Memorie  Storiche  della  Mirandola,"  i.  108;  ii.  43.  Calori  Cesis, 

"Giovanni Pico." 

 

12. Girolamo Benivieni, author of the "Canzone dell'Amore Celeste e Divino" 



on which Pico wrote the commentary referred to in the Introduction. For an account of 

him see Mazzucchelli, "Scrittori Italiani." 

 

13.  St.  Jerome,  author  of  the  Vulgate  version  of  the  Bible.  The  passage 



referred  to  is  as  follows:--"Scimus  plerosque  dedisse  eleemosynam,  sed  de  proprio 

corpore  nihil  dedisse;  porrexisse  egentibus  manum,  sed  carnis  voluptate  superatos 

dealbasse ea quæ foris erant, et intus plenos suisse ossibus mortuorum." "Epistola ad 

Eustochium Virginem," Opera (fol.) i. 65. g. 

 

14. "Potissimum" (G.F.P.), especially. So in "Romaunt of the Rose," l. 1,358-



9, the pomegranate is described as "a fruit full well to like, Namely, to folk when they 

be sick." 

 

15: A reminiscence of the "De Sapientis Constantia." 



 

16.  "Passim  "(G  F.P.),  on  all  hands.  In  fourteenth  and  fifteenth  century 

literature "by and by" frequently means severally, or one by one, as in "Romaunt of 

the  Rose,"  l.  4,582,  "These  were  his  words  by  and  by."  The  "Promptorum 

Parvulorum"  (Camden  Soc.)  translates  it  "sigillatim."  Thence  the  transition  to  the 

sense of the text is not difficult. 

 

17. See Introduction. 



 

18. "Quam primum"(G.F.P.), as soon as possible. 




THOMAS MORE et al. 

 

-79- 



 

19. See note 6. 

 

20. A reminiscence of Epode II. 



 

21.  After  leaving  Bologna,  Pico  spent  two  years  at  Padua,  the  stronghold  of 

scholasticism  in  Italy.  He  also  studied  for  a  time  at  Ferrara,  under  Battista  Guarino, 

the humanist, whom in one of his letters he addresses as preceptor meus. In 1482 he 

returned to Mirandola, in the vicinity of which he built himself a little villa, which he 

describes as "pleasant enough, considering the nature of the place and district," and on 

which he wrote a poem now lost. Here he entertained Aldo Manuzio, who about the 

same time, doubtless by Pico's recommendation, was appointed tutor to his nephew, 

Alberto  Pio,  and  a  Greek  scholar,  Emanuel  Adramyttenus,  a  refugee  from  Crete, 

where the Moslem was triumphant. He now began to correspond with Politian, and on 

a  visit  to  Reggio  made  the  acquaintance  of  Savonarola,  who  had  come  thither  to 

attend a chapter of Dominicans. In 1483 he went to Pavia, taking with him Emanuel 

Adramyttenus,  who  acted  as  his  Greek  master.  There  Emanuel  died,  and  Pico  then 

joined  Aldo  Manuzio  at  Carpi.  About  this  time  he  began  the  study  of  the  oriental 

languages, his master being one Jocana, otherwise unknown. In 1484, if not earlier, he 

went  to  Florence,  and  made  himself  known  to  Marsilio  Ficino,  who  had  then  just 

completed his translation of Plato. Pico urged him to crown his labours by performing 

the same office for Plotinus. Ficino, who was so little above the common superstitions 

of his time that he believed firmly in astrology, saw in Pico's unexpected appearance 

at this critical juncture an event not to be explained by natural causes, and taking his 

suggestion  as  a  divine  monition,  forthwith  set  about  the  work:  nor,  when  it  was 

completed, did he omit to recount, in dedicating it to Lorenzo, the incident which led 

to its initiation. Pico appears to have remained at Florence until the latter part of 1485, 

when we lose sight of him for a time. We obtain, however, a transient glimpse of him 

in  a  somewhat  novel  light  from  a  letter  from  his  sister-in-law,  Costanza,  to  Fra 

Girolamo,  of Piacenza, dated 16 May, 1486, and printed in "Memorie Storiche della 

Mirandola," ii. 167. From this it appears that he had then recently left Arezzo with a 

Florentine  married  lady,  who,  Costanza  is  careful  to  state,  "accompanied  him 

voluntarily," but had been attacked by some boors, who cut to pieces his attendants, 

wounded him in two places, and carried him back to Arezzo. Whether the outrage is 

imputable to the jealousy of the lady's husband, Costanza cannot say. How the affair 

ended does not appear, but in the following October we find Pico at Perugia, and in 

November at Fratta in the Ferrarese. Then followed the visit to Rome, the affair of the 

Theses, and the journey to France, where he was presented to Charles VIII. After his 

recall to Italy he resided either at Fiesole or Florence until the summer of 1491, when 

he accompanied Politian to Venice. They returned to Florence in time to be present at 

the deathbed of Lorenzo (8 Ap. 1492). The rest of his life Pico spent partly at Ferrara 

and 


partly 

at 


Florence. 

 

The  foregoing  brief  record  of  Pico's  wanderings  reposes  mainly  upon  the 



evidence  afforded  by  his  letters  and  those  of  Aldo  Manuzio,  Politian,  and  Ficino. 

Many  of  these,  however,  are  undated,  and  all  are  singularly  poor  in  personal  detail. 

See also Calori Cesis, "Giovanni Pico della Mirandola," 2nd ed., 1872; Parr Greswell, 

"Memoirs  of  Angelus  Politianus,"  &c.;  and  Villari's  "Savonarola,"  Eng.  tr.  1889,  ii. 

74. 

 

22. "Insidiosissima correptus est febre" (G.F.P.). 



 

23. See Note 2. 






Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə