The nadir experience: crisis, transition



Yüklə 216,82 Kb.

səhifə1/9
tarix05.10.2018
ölçüsü216,82 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9


THE NADIR EXPERIENCE: CRISIS, TRANSITION,

AND GROWTH

Russell Stagg, Ph.D.

Ladysmith, British Columbia, Canada

ABSTRACT: The author summarized research on the nadir experience, the experience of one of

the very lowest points of life. Although a sense of disintegration, powerlessness, and emptiness

marks its immediate aftermath, survivors of rape, bereavement, and maritime disasters have shown

that a nadir experience can also be an opportunity for personal transformation and psychological

growth. Severe trauma is more likely to lead to positive change, and reflection seems to play an

important role in this process. Among the positive changes observed are increases in personal well-

being, sense of meaning in life, spirituality, inner wisdom, and compassion. The author described

how he experienced such positive changes following a nadir experience in his own life. Therapists

dealing with persons undergoing the nadir experience should encourage reflection oriented toward

the future as well as the past. The author has suggested mindfulness meditation as a useful

technique to encourage such reflection.

KEYWORDS: nadir experience, posttraumatic growth, trauma therapy, reflection, rumination,

mindfulness, meditation, spiritual assessment.

Half a century ago, Thorne (1963) introduced the term nadir experiences to

describe the very opposite of peak experiences, the highly positive experiences

that transcend everyday life (Maslow 1964/1970). While peak experiences are

worthy of study, so too are the deep emotional traumas such as bereavement,

depression, loss, or a crisis of existence that Thorne was referring to. Despite

their devastating effect on a person’s quality of life, nadir experiences that

challenge core beliefs and offer the opportunity for reflection can become

opportunities for personal transformation and psychological growth.

Thorne (1963) defined the nadir experience to be the ‘‘subjective experiencing

of what is subjectively recognized to be one of the lowest points of life’’ (p. 248),

and claimed that both peak and nadir experiences could give valuable

information for clinical personality studies. He set about obtaining data about

such experiences in a systematic way, by asking subjects to write about the

three best and three worst experiences of their lives. He then created a detailed

classification scheme for the peak experiences, and observed that the nadir

experiences usually involve ‘‘death, illness, tragedy, loss, degradation or

deflation of Self ’’ (p. 249). Although he noted that his research was ongoing,

Thorne never published further information on the nadir experience. In a

preface to Religions, Values, and Peak Experiences written shortly before his

death, Maslow (1964/1970) called for more research on nadir experiences.

Copyright ’ 2014 Transpersonal Institute

Email: stagg.russell@gmail.com

The author gratefully acknowledges the helpful comments of Ms. Sara Kulba, Dr. Sharon Moore, Ms. Caylee

Villett, and the anonymous referees.

72

The Journal of Transpersonal Psychology, 2014, Vol. 46, No. 1




Although recent research such as that of Joseph (2011) has addressed the nadir

experience, there is still a lack of research into such concepts as spiritual growth

in the aftermath of trauma, and its implications for therapy. This article is an

attempt to address this lack.

Like a peak experience, a nadir experience is transcendent in that it marks a

dramatic shift from ordinary everyday life. However, it is transcendent in a

negative way. While the peak experience provides a sense of personal

integration and oneness with the world (Maslow, 1987), a nadir experience

initially leads to the opposite feeling: a sense of aloneness and vulnerability

(Kumar, 2005). My purpose in this paper is to investigate the nadir experience

and the circumstances under which it can result in positive growth. I describe

the types of initial events in the nadir experience, the characteristics of the

transition stage that follows, and the factors that allow a person to experience

growth and transformation and to return to a life that may have been much

changed by the event. I point out the ways in which the nadir experience can

result in meaning-making, spiritual growth, inner wisdom, and increased

compassion. I discuss the implications for counseling clients undergoing a

nadir experience. I also describe the positive results of a nadir event that

occurred in my own life. Since studies of the nadir experience date back five

decades, I examine both current and historical research on the subject.

C

HARACTERIZING THE



N

ADIR


E

XPERIENCE

In On Grief and Grieving, Kubler-Ross and Kessler (2005) described the nadir

experience of grief as consisting of five stages: denial, anger, bargaining,

depression, and acceptance. Their use of the word stages is unfortunate, since

the authors cautioned that not all people go through all stages, and even when

they do, they do not necessarily go through them in order. How, then, should

one characterize a nadir experience such as grief ? First, I propose making a

distinction between the nadir experience and the nadir event. The nadir event

may be short-lived, but the nadir experience continues as a person deals with

the aftermath of that event. Persons living through the same nadir event may

have quite different nadir experiences, as the survivors of marine catastrophes

have demonstrated (Joseph, 2011; Joseph, Williams, & Yule, 1993). A person

who perceives a nadir event as challenging core values is more likely to

experience long-term positive change (Tedeschi, Calhoun, & Cann, 2007). In

fact, both Lancaster, Kloep, Rodriguez, and Weston (2013) and Boals,

Steward, and Schuettler (2010) found a positive correlation between

posttraumatic growth and event centrality (the degree to which a nadir event

challenges central concepts of self-identity). Regardless of the nature of the

traumatic event, however, nadir experiences share important characteristics.

One of these characteristics is the way a nadir experience divides into three

phases. For example, following the nadir event of bereavement there comes a

grieving period and finally a return to life after the loss. I propose describing the

nadir experience by including in it these three natural phases: the event, the

adjustment, and the return. In doing so, I shall make use of the terminology

Nadir Experience

73




Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə