The nadir experience: crisis, transition



Yüklə 126,81 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə3/9
tarix05.10.2018
ölçüsü126,81 Kb.
#72228
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9

Powerlessness

An important characteristic of the threshold stage is a sense of powerlessness

over what has befallen us. Such powerlessness is an inevitable consequence of

bereavement, but it also occurs with other nadir experiences such as addiction. A

person struggling with substance abuse often feels that he or she can do nothing

to overcome the dependence. This is reflected in the first step of Alcoholics

Anonymous, that ‘‘we admitted we were powerless over alcohol—that our lives

had become unmanageable’’ (Alcoholics Anonymous, 2002, p. 59). By reciting

this step, the recovering alcoholic recognizes that he or she has reached the

lowest point and wants to recover. James (1902/1997) also noted that the same

sense of powerlessness occurs when the crisis is a spiritual one.

Emptiness

A nadir event may abruptly cut us off from our past and our sense of

personhood that depends on the past. The familiar terrain of our life before the

event is gone, and we feel disconnected from the world around us. Various

terms have described this profound disconnection: Almaas (1986/2000) referred

to it as a deficient emptiness, Frankl (1946/1959) as an existential vacuum, and

Perls (1959/1969) as a desert or a sterile void (pointing out that it does not

necessarily remain sterile for long).

M

OVING ON OR



B

ECOMING


S

TUCK


After the Herald of Free Enterprise ferry sank in the English Channel in 1987,

claiming 193 lives, Joseph (2011) surveyed some of the survivors. While many

showed symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, he was astonished to find

that 43% reported positive changes in their lives following the disaster—almost

the same percentage as those reporting negative changes (46%). Using

passengers’ written responses as to how their lives had changed, he constructed

the Changes in Outlook Questionnaire (CiOQ; Joseph et al., 1993). The 26

items of the CiOQ measured both negative changes such as ‘‘my life has no

meaning anymore,’’ and positive ones such as ‘‘I value my relationships more

now’’ (p. 275). When the cruise ship Jupiter sank off Greece in 1988, claiming

four lives, Joseph et al. (1993) were able to confirm that the earlier results were

not an anomaly. Ninety-four percent of respondents agreed with the statement

that ‘‘I don’t take life for granted anymore,’’ and 91% with the statement that

‘‘I value my relationships much more now.’’ Eighty-eight percent agreed with

the statement that ‘‘I value other people more now,’’ and 71% with the

statement that ‘‘I’m a more understanding and tolerant person now’’ (p. 275).

Various investigators have discovered similar changes in persons undergoing

the nadir experience of bereavement. Braun and Berg (1994) analyzed extensive

interviews with ten mothers who experienced the unexpected loss of a child,

and found that respondents reported an increase in their understanding of

what was important in life. Milo (1997) interviewed eight mothers who had lost

76

The Journal of Transpersonal Psychology, 2014, Vol. 46, No. 1




a child with a developmental disability. Six of these mothers felt they had

experienced personal transformation in the areas of priorities in life, their

identity, their relationships, their spirituality, and their view of the world. To

investigate such positive changes occurring in bereaved persons (and also

negative ones), Hogan, Greenfield, and Schmidt (2001) developed the Hogan

Grief Reaction Checklist (HGRC). The instrument contains 49 negative and 12

positive statements that respondents rate using a five-point Likert scale. An

example of a negative statement is: ‘‘My hopes are shattered,’’ while an

example of a positive statement is: ‘‘I care more deeply for others.’’ Using the

HGRC on a group of 586 bereaved adults (mostly mothers who had lost a

child), the authors found that these adults saw themselves as tougher, more

compassionate, more loving, more resilient, and more forgiving in the

aftermath of their loss. In short, they saw themselves as having been

transformed by the nadir experience of grief.

When Burt and Katz (1987) surveyed 113 rape survivors, they included in their

survey a list of 28 questions about ‘‘changes that come from my efforts to

recover’’ (p. 70). Items, which included ‘‘I believe my life has meaning,’’ and

‘‘I’m able to get my needs met’’ (p. 70), were rated on a seven-point Likert

scale. More than half the respondents agreed with 15 or more of the questions.

In the wake of devastating events, many people experience positive change and

growth. Tedeschi and Calhoun (1996) first used the term posttraumatic growth

to describe such positive change. They noted that survivors of trauma often

experience a deepening of relationships, a desire for more intimacy, greater

compassion, a sense of being strengthened by the experience, and a renewed

appreciation for life. However, not everyone will achieve growth and reach the

reincorporation stage. The widow, who years after her husband’s death,

continues to set a place for him at the dinner table, is clearly stuck in the

threshold stage. She has a loss orientation, rather than a restoration

orientation. What enables a person to move on, to focus on restoration, and

to enter the reincorporation stage?

Degree of Trauma

The degree of trauma may be an important factor. Tedeschi and Calhoun

(1996) used the Traumatic Stress Schedule (TSS; Norris, 1990) to measure the

degree of trauma suffered by 604 undergraduate psychology students in the

previous year. The TSS is a list of 14 to 26 questions (depending on the type of

event) regarding events such as assault, bereavement, and rape. Questions

included ‘‘how many loved ones died as a result of this incident?’’ and ‘‘did you

ever feel like your own life was in danger during the incident?’’ (p. 1717).

Tedeschi and Calhoun subjectively rated the respondents as suffering ‘‘no

trauma’’ or ‘‘severe trauma’’ (p. 465). They then created the Posttraumatic

Growth Inventory (PTGI) to measure positive change following trauma. The

PTGI includes 21 questions in five categories: relating to others, new

possibilities, personal strength, spiritual change, and appreciation of life.

Examples of characteristics that respondents rated on a six-point Likert scale

were: ‘‘a sense of closeness with others’’ and ‘‘knowing I can handle

Nadir Experience

77



Yüklə 126,81 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə