The Polish Pianist Artur Hermelin h a n n a p a L m o n



Yüklə 267,22 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix26.09.2018
ölçüsü267,22 Kb.
#70828


 

M

 u z y k a l i a  XIII 



·  

Judaica 4

 

The Polish Pianist Artur Hermelin



H a n n a  P a l m o n

Introduction

For many years, I knew about my late relative - the pianist Artur Hermelin - only this: that 

he grew up in Lwow (called Lemberg when he was born there in 1901); that he was a child prodigy; 

and that as a piano soloist he toured Europe with orchestras and gave recitals - some of which were 

broadcasted by the Polish Radio. I also knew that Artur perished in the Holocaust. When my father 

told me that, his eyes revealed how much he was still missing his cousin Artur, who had been one 

year older than him; that was 30 years after Artur’s tragic death, when I was still a child; it was far 

beyond my grasp, and it still is. We had an old small photo of Artur as a very young boy, hugging 

a big accordion and giving the camera a warm smile.

During my recent attempts to collect details about Artur’s 41 years of life – I’ve read that 

Artur was among the musicians who were forced to perform music for the Nazis in the ghetto 

of Lwow and later in the labor camp; hundreds of thousands of Jews - Artur and his relatives among 

them - were murdered at the ghetto of Lwow and at its notorious Janowska camp, or transported 

from the ghetto or the camp to concentration camps, in the years 1941-1943. May the memory 

of the victims be blessed.

Had Artur Hermelin survived the Holocaust and continued to play, I would have probably 

asked   him   to   play   for   me   the   music   he   loved   -   Bach,   Beethoven,   Schumann,   Liszt,   Chopin, 

Debussy, Szymanowski, Tansman... But would have we been living in the same country at all? 

And would have Artur kept performing in the post-Holocaust era? Those questions - which have 

crossed my mind so many times since my childhood - will remain unanswered; but my urge to get 

acquainted with Artur’s biography, and above all to hear him playing (how much I hope to find old 

1



 

M

 u z y k a l i a  XIII 



·  

Judaica 4

recordings of him!) - is still growing deeper; I realize that this research of mine might be the last 

chance to trace Artur’s footprints. I would like him to be remembered. In this article I would like 

to tell about Artur, whose pianistic personality evolved through many wanderings, successes and 

failures, and whose style was crystalized out of all he had learnt with his five outstanding teachers - 

four of them Polish.



Polish music in the beginning of the 20

th

 century

In the beginning of the 20 century, the Polish musical life stood on the threshold of opening up 

to experimentalism on different levels; “Young Poland” (1890-1918) was a movement that appeared 

on culture’s stage as a reaction to the call of the Polish positivists to adopt a rational and “organic” - 

as opposed to tempestuous - approach in order to gradually regain independence for Poland; while 

the   positivists   partially   rejected   the   stormy   emotional   state   of   mind   of   the   romantic   period, 

the philosophers and artists of “Young Poland” rejected the bourgeois mediocre culture, and favored 

the ideas of the decadence movement - a vitriolic, modernistic, bothersome type of romanticism, 

and a daring use of symbols, dreams and fantasies. The artists of that movement wanted to use 

Polish idioms (like the Mazurka's rhythm and character) in a fresh, contemporary way; for example, 

the music of the composer Mieczysław Karłowicz was neoromantic and influenced by Tchaikovsky 

and   Wagner;   his   symphonic   poems   demonstrated   the   musical   orientation   of   the   later   "Young 

Poland" composers - Szymanowski, Różycki, Fitelberg and Szeluto. Szymanowski was influenced 

not   only  by Wagner   and   Strauss,   but   also   by  the   atonal   works   of   the   symbolist   Scriabin,   by 

the impressionists Debussy and Ravel, and by the distinctive folk music of the Polish highland 

around Zakopane.

In 1905 Różycki  founded - with the rest of the “Young Poland” composers - the “Young 

Polish Composers’ Society”, whose goal was to promote performances of modern Polish music 

abroad; that demonstrated the growing interest - among Polish musicians - in exchanging ideas with 

contemporary musicians in other European countries. Grzegorz Fitelberg, who was a prominent 

conductor (he worked with the Polish Radio orchestra since its founding), promoted the new Polish 

music - in Paris, among other places, and worked a lot with Szymanowski and the pianist Artur 

Rubinstein.

2



 

M

 u z y k a l i a  XIII 



·  

Judaica 4

While   in   Paris,   young   Polish   musicians   confronted   a   prevailing   dislike   towards 

neoromanticism. The musical “fashion” in Paris in those days was a reserved neoclassicism, with an 

emphasis on classical structures which were balanced enough to accommodate the fruits of daring 

musical   experiments   with   harmony,   rhythm,   poly-   and   atonality,   etc.   That   French   style 

of   composing   highly   influenced   Szymanowski,   as   well   as   his   contemporaries   -   Aleksander 

Tansman, for example.

In fact, Józef Koffler (a teacher at the Lwow conservatory in the years 1928-1941, and 

a colleague of Artur Hermelin who also taught there in the years 1932-1941) was the first Polish 

composer to adopt dodecaphony (since 1926) - after studying with Arnold Schoenberg in Vienna. 

The evolution of his music - starting with folkloristic elements and tonal harmonies, then adding 

to his palette whole-tone modality, serial dodecaphonic organization and neo-classical “transparent” 

textures, then oscillating between two kinds of neo-classicism - the “dry” and airy French style and 

the more polyphonic German style, and finally tailoring his music for the Russian regime before 

the Nazi invasion - draws a scenario which is typical to periods of experimentalism in music history 

(coupled so often with stormy political and social conditions); Koffler’s personal music history can 

also teach about the musical climate in which Artur Hermelin took his first steps and matured 

as a pianist - in Lwow, Vienna, Paris and Warsaw.

Koffler belonged to a group of Polish avant-garde composers, who created in the first half 

of the 20th century, and who were continuously criticized by Polish conservative music critics - 

mainly in Warsaw; those composers were considered to be too attentive to - and influenced by - 

foreign avant-garde musical cultures like the French one, thus being only “loosely Polish” in their 

music, on top of being disrespectful to the lofty music, which is - as the critic Piotr Rytel phrased it 

on Dec. 1

st

 1926, in “Gazeta Warszawska Poranna”: 



Eternal, forever young, always  fresh, art  born of the elements of the indestructible divine  -  by throwing it from 

the temple of art to the streets, so now the mob can enter the new temple...

And Rytel added:

Stupid, though quite coarse, rhythmic ideas are introduced - regardless of form and meaning. Offensive vulgarity and 

ugliness are so strong, noisy and untiring, and they are turning everything upside down; it causes an extreme lowering  

of requirements. Skillful composing, the ability to master the material, a subtle taste 

all those have been sent to the 



executioner, being replaced by conceited dilettantism.

3



 

M

 u z y k a l i a  XIII 



·  

Judaica 4

Artur Hermelin - having been a pianist and not a composer - was, nevertheless, similarly criticized 

in   Warsaw;   the   most   harsh   critic   reviews   were   written   by   the   above   mentioned   conservative 

musician Piotr Rytel, whose responses might have been adding weight to the reasons which made 

Tansman, Fitelberg and Artur Rubinstein leave Warsaw; and also by the pianist and conductor 

Juliusz Wertheim, who wrote in Nov. 23

rd

 1926, in “Epoka”:



In addition to the typical and usual benefits of a talented pianist, i.e. proper sense of the instrument sound and  ... high 

level of general technique, Hermelin has a real talent of disclosing the content of the work he plays. But he has also 

disagreeable   manners,   and   the   experimental   interpretation   of   pieces   such   as   Perkowski’s   sonata   -   cannot   remain  

unpunished; thus, the undoubted performance skills - which have been so far acquired by Mr. Hermelin - are damaged.



Childhood

The   Lwow-based   Hermelin   (Harmelin)   family,   into   which   Artur   was   born   111   years   ago, 

was a branch of a larger Jewish family from Brody; his grandfather was the Hassidic rabbi Baruch-

David Hermelin, whose sons - at least some of them - pursued secular studies: Dr. Eliasz Hermelin, 

for   example,   was   a   well-known   gynecologist   in   Lwow   (before   Second  Wrold  War   he   headed 

the   department   at   the   Jewish   Rappaport   hospital);   Dr.   Natan   Hermelin   (Artur’s   father)   was 

a successful lawyer, who carried out a life-long endeavor - to nurture and develop the musical life in 

Lwow,   and   especially   among   his   Jewish   community:   He   was   a   violinist,   composer   and 

the conductor of the amateur symphonic orchestra near the Galician Music Society.  In 1919, he was 

among the founders of the Jewish Musical Society, whose goal was to revitalize the musical life 

in Lwow - after a long regression during World War I; first, that Society organized symphonic 

concerts - played by a group of professional Jewish musicians as well as amateurs. Dr Natan 

Hermelin was chosen to direct and conduct that Jewish Symphonic Orchestra (a position he held 

until 1927). The Jewish “Chwila” newspaper described, for example, the inauguration concert at the 

new   Jewish   orphanage   house   in   Lwow   in   1920   -   in   which   Natan   Hermelin   conducted 

Mendelssohn’s  Serenade  op. 43. In the “Jewish Almanac,” 1936, which was published in Lwow, 

the   musician  Alfred   Plohn   wrote   that   the   press   in   Lwow   praised   the   concerts   of   the   Jewish 

Symphony Orchestra, stressing their high artistic level. There were, for example, many excellent 

violinists in that orchestra - who could play exceptionally well as soloists too (and they indeed gave 

solo recitals and performed with other orchestras like the Lwow Theatre Orchestra, and some of 

them taught at music conservatories in Lwow): Adolf Bruckmann, Maurycy Diamand, Bernard 

Bauer, Dr. Leon Bristiger, Eduard and Dr. Ignacy Fuhrmann, Dr. Marek Gottesmann and Dr. Natan 

4



 

M

 u z y k a l i a  XIII 



·  

Judaica 4

Hermelin himself - to name a few. The Jewish Musical Society organized music festivals like 

the “Chopin Days” - an event which was artistically directed by the composer Jozef Koffler.

So, Artur  Hermelin – Natan’s son - grew up in a musical family. The first music-related 

event in Artur’s life - as far as I know - took place in 1914: Artur moved from Lwow in eastern 

Galicia to Vienna (both cities belonged then to the Austro-Hungarian Empire) in order to study with 

the   famous   Polish   composer,   pianist   and   piano   teacher   Teodor   Leszetycki   (1830   -   1915). 

Who moved with 13 years old Artur to Vienna - may be his parents? - that I don’t know, but I can  

imagine how excited and probably terrified young Artur was on his way to study with famous 

Leszetycki in his private studio, which attracted pupils from all around the world; Leszetycki had 

studied with Carl Czerny (one of Beethoven’s pupils), and became famous for his pianistic virtuosi 

abilities; he taught for 25 years in St. Petersburg, later returning to Vienna to found his own studio, 

where   special   assistants  -   outstanding   pianists  -   used   to   prepare   the   new   pupils   to  work   with 

the master. “Leszetycki method” gained huge reputation (despite Leszetycki’s protest: “There is no 

method!”), and Artur Schnabel, Alexander Brailowsky, Anna Yesipova, Mieczysław Horszowski, 

Ignacy Friedman, Ignacy Jan Paderewski - were among his pupils. His motto was: “No art without 

life, no life without art”. Artur had one year, at most, of studies with Leszetycki - the last year of 

Leszetycki’s   life;   like   all   the   master’s   pupils,  Artur   had   to   play   for   the   whole   group   during 

the “collective lessons”, while in the one-on-one lessons each pupil enjoyed Leszetycki’s very 

“tailored” instruction. Interestingly,  much later in his life, Artur would learn with Leszetycki’s 

former pupil - Alexander Brailowski - in Paris.

Upon his teacher’s death, Artur returned to Lwow, and was a student at the Higher School of 

Music   “Sabina   Kasparek”.   Between   1916   and   1919   his   teacher   was   Vilem   Kurz   -   at 

the conservatory of the Society of Galician Music (founded in 1848); that conservatory became later 

the Mykola Lysenko State Music Academy, by merging with the two other conservatories in Lwow 

in 1939 - the year the Soviets took over (The first director of that conservatory was Karol Mikuli - 

Chopin's pupil). Vilem Kurz (1872 - 1945), was a well- known Czech pianist and piano teacher, 

who   taught   in  Vienna   before   arriving   at   Lwow;   his   teaching   methods   were   largely   based   on 

Leszetycki’s approach. Eduard Steuermann – Schoenberg’s pianist-to-be (and one of Artur’s later 

teachers) - was among Kurz’ pupils; so were the composers and pianists Gideon Klein and Rafael 

Schachter (later - active musicians in a surreal world: Theresienstadt concentration camp).

5



 

M

 u z y k a l i a  XIII 



·  

Judaica 4

The years 1919-1930

When Vilem Kurz moved to Prague in 1919, Artur started his studies with the Polish pianist Jerzy 

Lalewicz (1875-1951), who had been studying with Anna Jesipova (Leszetycki’s pupil and wife) 

in   St.   Petersburg.   In   Lwow   he   taught   for   two   years   -   after   teaching   in   Vienna   and   before 

immigrating   to   Buenos  Aires.   The   pianists   Zygmunt   Dygat,   Mieczyslaw   Munz   and   Leopold 

Münzer, and the conductor Artur Rodziński, were among Lalewicz pupils, who were inspired by his 

rich and mainly contemporary repertoire - Chopin, Ravel, Melcer, Paderewski, Szymanowski.

When Lalewicz moved to Argentina, Artur left too: at age 18 he traveled to Vienna again, 

this time to his fourth teacher Eduard Steuermann (1892-1964),  who had been Kurz’s pupil (like 

Artur), as well as Ferruccio Busoni’s pupil. Eduard Steuermann, who was born in Sambor, Galicia, 

became a performer of Schoenberg’s music, and in 1938 immigrated to USA and taught at Juilliard 

School of Music (Alfred Brendel and Lwow-born Jakob Gimpel were among his many talented 

pupils).

From Biblioteka Narodowa at Warsaw I’ve received a photo which Artur sent in 1927 to his 

beloved teacher Eduard Steuermann, with a dedication that said:

6



 

M

 u z y k a l i a  XIII 



·  

Judaica 4

To my dear professor and his wife - with gratitude for so many pleasant moments spent together, 

Sincerely devoted, Arthur Hermelin

1

.

It is interesting to look at the “family tree” of Artur’s teachers, and to notice the “web” of multiple 

connections   between   teachers   and   pupils.   It   seems   that   pupils   chose   their   teachers   according 

to a “familiarity code”, preferring to study with teachers who were pupils (or teachers) of their 

former:

1

 Artur Hermelin’s photo with his dedication to Eduard Steuermann (from 1927); received from Biblioteka Narodowa 



(The National Library), Warsaw.

7



 

M

 u z y k a l i a  XIII 



·  

Judaica 4

In red – the names of Artur Hermelin’s teachers. The arrows’ direction is from a teacher to his/her 

pupil.

Artur studied with Steuermann until 1923 or 1924; then he lived in Paris for more than 



a year, and during that time he might have already started studying with the Ukrainian- French 

excellent pianist Alexandre Brailowsky (1896-1976). In 1925 Artur returned to Lwow and gave his 

first   recitals   there;   Vasyl   Barvinsky   (the   Ukrainian   composer,   pianist   and   conductor)   wrote 

in Lwow, in 1925:

In   Hermelin’s   musical   profile   there   are   no  “pale   features”;   he  is   outstanding  not   only  thanks   to  his  well-known 

technique   or   his   musical   intelligence,   but   -   first   of   all   -   thanks   to   his   balance   which   is   rare   at   this   young   age; 

that balance enables Hermelin to avoid getting blinded by superficial and external aspects of music; he entirely masters 

the architecture of big forms like the sonata (he played a sonata by Chopin) or the Fantasie (by Schumann), but he also 

shows us the beauty which lies in the details of miniature forms like Chopin’s mazurkas.

8



 

M

 u z y k a l i a  XIII 



·  

Judaica 4

In 1926, Artur gave concerts and recitals in Warsaw and Paris. Since that year, Artur came 

frequently   for   long   stays   in   Paris.   In   Paris,  Artur   belonged   to   the   Stowarzyszenie   Młodych 

Muzyków Polaków (Society of Young Polish Musicians), which Piotr Perkowski, Feliks Roderyk 

Łabuński and Stanisław Wiechowicz had founded in 1926.

Many of Artur’s friends from his piano classes in Vienna and Lwow - reached Paris too, 

as well as Polish composers, conductors and other instrumentalists; they came to study with Nadia 

Boulanger,  Albert   Roussel,   Vincent   d’Indy,   Igor   Stravinsky,   Maurice   Ravel,  Arthur   Honneger, 

Alfred Cortot, Isidor Philip, Wanda Landowska... At that time, Artur himself studied there with 

Alexander   Brailowsky.   The   influences   of   Debussy,   Ravel,   Stravinsky   and   the   French   “Group 

of   Six”   were   shaping   -   in   France   and   then   outside   too   -   experimental   neoclassical   Polish 

composition; the tonal system was on its way to collapse - with the help of dodecaphony and 

polytonality, and composers used polyrhytm, jazz idiom and clusters - among other innovations.

Artur,   who   inherited   from   his   teacher   Eduard   Steuermann   a   sense   of   commitment 

to the music of the future, was repeatedly playing in Paris the contemporary works of Tansman, 

Szymanowski and Perkowski; the musical conversation between the French music and the Polish 

music   was   indeed   fruitful.   Tansman’s   works,   for   example,   were   highly   influenced   by   jazz, 

polytonality, neoclassical dialogue with traditional forms (including Polish dances), and Ravel’s 

extended harmonies.

According to several Polish critics - from Warsaw mainly - Artur Hermelin was highly 

appreciated in  Paris, and his interpretations of the contemporary Polish music  he played  were 

considered to be very intelligent and balanced.

At   that   time,   Paris   was   called   home   -   temporarily   or   permanently   -   by   many   Polish 

musicians   like   Szymon   Laks,   Mieczysław   Horszowski,   Zygmunt   Dygat,   Leopold   Münzer, 

Stanisław Szpinalski, Henryk Sztompka, Jerzy Sulikowski, Alexander Tansman, Piotr Perkowski, 

Ignacy Jan Paderewski, Leopold Stokowski, Roman Palester, and others. The Society of Young 

Polish musicians organized concerts and recitals - mainly of Polish music by Karol Szymanowski, 

Piotr Perkowski, Aleksander Tansman, Feliks Roderyk Łabuński, Ignacy Paderewski, Józef Koffler, 

Alfred Gradstein, Karol Rathaus, Tadeusz Zygfryd Kassern, Tadeusz Szeligowski... Artur played in 

many such recitals, including at the Sorbonne’s Institute of Slavic studies and at the Concerts 

9



 

M

 u z y k a l i a  XIII 



·  

Judaica 4

Pasdeloup - the Sunday concerts on the rotunda of the Cirque d’Hiver: On May 20 1928, in such 

a   concert,   the   conductor   Rhene-Baton   conducted   the   Symphonic   and  Artur   performed   -   with 

the orchestra - a Symphony by Tansman, Humoresque by Perkowski, and a work by Szymanowski 

(the   singer  Suzanne   Cesbron-Viseur  also   took  part  in   that   concert).  Artur  went  on  performing 

frequently in Paris until the Second World War.

In Warsaw, where Artur performed in 1926, he had to cope with the harsh critics mentioned 

above; on the other hand, Karol Stromenger (A Polish composer and music critic in Warsaw) wrote 

in “Illustrated weekly”, no. 50, p. 872:

The Pianist Artur Hermelin is a young talent, already significantly sophisticated  (...) from Lwow, carefully educated 

abroad, currently residing in Paris; he has a prominent, serious and interesting sense of artistic structure. He has  

indisputable career-predestination to be an interesting pianist (...) Artur Hermelin dominates the technique of bravura,  

his  interpretations   are   carefully  groomed   and   based   on   reasonable   grounds,   and   his   musical   tone   is  expressive   - 

revealing the artist's imagination, seriousness, and pianistic intelligence. Artur Hermelin is spiritually at home when he 

plays Beethoven - whose concerto in C minor was played beautifully by the Philharmonic, and he also feels comfortable 

in the modernist piano style of which he is an eloquent advocate. That style was presented by the sonatas and fantasies 

of a young Polish composer - Piotr Perkowski.

In   1927  Artur   had   a   long   tour   in   the   United   States   and   several   countries   in   South  America; 

for example, he played in the Teatro Solis in Montevideo, Uruguay. Then, Artur performed all over 

Europe; In a Spanish “Buletin Musical”, on its lists of musical events in 1928, I’ve found that Artur 

performed   with   the   famous   violinist   Nathan   Milstein   in   Toledo   (April   1928)   and   in   Malaga 

(November 1928); interestingly,  in the same  concert series in Malaga, Michel Grandjany gave 

a harp recital in October 1928, and in December 1928 - Vladimir Horowitz gave a piano recital

2

.



Artur’s tours with the Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra, out of Poland, took him to Rome, 

Bologna, Paris and Algiers, and his recitals - to other cities in the following countries: Austria, 

France, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, Algeria, Tunis, Brazil, Uruguay, Chile, Argentina and USA.

Upon his return to Poland, Artur performed music by Chopin, Szymanowski and Tansman 

in Cracow, with the Warsaw Philharmonic.

2

   www.biblioteca.ayuncordoba.es



 

 

 .



10


 

M

 u z y k a l i a  XIII 



·  

Judaica 4

The years 1931-1941

1931   was   dedicated   to   concerts   in   Warsaw,   and   according   to   the  Słownik   pianistów   polskich 

(Encyclopedia   of   Polish   Pianists)   by   Stanisław   Dybowski   -   by   that   time  Artur   was   already 

an appreciated pianist there; Stanisław Dybowski writes:

Artur Hermelin’s performance was warmly applauded - not less than those of our popular Edwin Fischer and Stefan 

Askenase.

When Artur returned to Lwow, he started teaching piano there, at the Music Conservatory. 

In 1934, the conservatory faculty gave a series of  recitals called  The music of the 20th century

in the first recital, Artur Hermelin and the violinist Marek Bauer played together two sonatas - one 

by   Debussy   and   one   by   Szymanowski,   and  Artur   played   a   suite   by   Karol   Rathaus.   Stefania 

Łobaczewska, the music critic of “Gazetta Lwowska”, praised the initiative and the concerts. (She 

was an enthusiastic advocate of Polish contemporary music; Magdalena Dziadek writes in his paper 



Stefania Łobaczewska as a music critic: “She perceived it as a stylistically varied and aesthetically 

uncrystallized preparatory stage on the way towards the formation of a universal music of the 

future “.)

In “The Jewish Almanac” from 1936, Alfred Plohn wrote:

Among the previously mentioned pianists - few have already gained international fame, as mature artists; Leopold 

Münzer should be mentioned first - an excellent pianist who has already played a lot, and very successfully, in several  

European capitals; his name is frequently mentioned in the foreign radio stations and he is quite rightly considered as  

one of the best Polish pianists. Artur Hermelin is also known as an excellent pianist and musician. He has played in the  

main cities in Europe and America, always enjoying big applause and deep appreciation.

Artur was also teaching at the conservatory of Galician Music Society in Lwow - where 

he was a professor of piano performance for advanced students. In 1939-1941 he was teaching 

at the Mykola Lysenko Music Academy - which merged the three former conservatories.

Artur gave recitals for the Polish Radio; some of them were broadcasted internationally. 

The Polish Radio gained an enormous importance in the musical life in Poland between the wars, 

since - besides three nationalized conservatories - the other conservatories and orchestras were 

in   poor   condition   between   the   wars;   the   radio   -   which   had  subscribers   -  did   well,   and   hence 

succeeded to pay for commissioned compositions by young composers, found the excellent Polish 

Radio Symphony Orchestra (directed by the Jewish conductor Grzegorz Fitelberg), encouraged 

11



 

M

 u z y k a l i a  XIII 



·  

Judaica 4

young   performers   and   ensembles,   and   raised   the   performance   level   thanks   to   constructive 

competition.

The British newspaper “Palestine Post” used to list the “wireless” broadcasted recitals and 

concerts from around the globe - which could be heard in British Palestine, and on those lists I’ve 

found out that in 1936, 1937 and 1938 the Polish Radio broadcasted Artur’s recitals: one was 

dedicated to music by Chopin, one - to contemporary Polish music, and there were no details about 

the third one.

When  Artur   stayed   in  Warsaw,   his   address   -   as   listed   in   the   1939   Warsaw   Telephone 

Directory - was: Hermelin Artur, Prof. Cons., ul. Długa 3, telephone 110636.

Like his father Natan, Artur used to  conduct an orchestra in concerts which the Jewish 

Musical Society organized in Lwow, and may be in other occasions too. In the newspaper “Tydzień 

Polski” (“Polish Week”), the critic (K.K.) wrote about a concert at the Grand Theatre in Lwow, 

which was called  Opera in Kratke  (Checkered Opera); it was a light opera - composed by Artur 

Hermelin and Jakub Mund. (Mund was a well-known composer and conductor.) K.K. mentioned 

the modern and unique instrumentation.

Stefania   Łobaczewska   wrote   a   warm   critic   about   a   concert   by   the   amateur   Jewish 

Symphonic   Orchestra   in   Lwow:   the   conductor   was   Mark   Horowitz,   and   the   soloist   -  Artur 

Hermelin, playing his often-performed Liszt’s Concerto No. 2. Łobaczewska mentioned Artur’s 

virtuosi skills 

– 

“which were counterbalanced by the lyrical and soft melodious movements”, and 



defined the integration of Artur’s pianistic “features” as “harmonious and effective”.

Destruction and death - the Holocaust

In October 1941 - four months after the Nazis invaded Russian eastern Galicia and incited the 

Ukrainian local population to kill thousands of Jews in Lwow and other towns and shtetls - around 

119,000 Jews were imprisoned in the ghetto of Lwow, which was awfully crowded; many Jews 

from shtetls around Lwow were brought there too, and there were  many Jewish refugees who 

escaped to Lwow from western and central Poland. The shock and mental stress were enormous, 

12



 

M

 u z y k a l i a  XIII 



·  

Judaica 4

since everything escalated very fast in Lwow, which was previously ruled by the Soviets for two 

years.

In the newspaper “Gazetta Lwowska” (which the Nazis published in Lwow after invading 



the city), in 1941 (first year, issue no. 4), a rhymed text was printed under the title:  Poem about 

music  (by “Scherzo”). The text mentioned more than 40 Jewish musicians, who lived or at least 

performed in Lwow, and the following quotations demonstrate “Scherzo” ‘s extremely hostile style 

of writing about the Jewish musicians: “Mr. Jozef Koffler is leading the way, with great marketing 

inventiveness,   but   with   a   talent   for   impotence”;   “Next   -   Münzer,   Grünfeld   and   Golhamer   are 

following the herd”; “One Jew is galloping on another Jew”; “Dunayevsky (...) steals from songs 

composed by others”; “And right behind him - a big nothing with much wit; in short - Schütz!”

Natan Hermelin committed suicide in 1941, in the ghetto. Artur kept on living until he was 

killed in March 16 1942, in the ghetto or in Janowska camp; he was buried in the Jewish

cemetery, in the 13 plot. His last address in the ghetto, before he was killed, was Sp. Kuszewicza.

3

Artur was most probably performing in the ghetto of Lwow, since Philip Friedman and 



Wilem Toerien have listed his name among the names of musicians in the ghetto. He was there 

among   many   excellent   musicians,   whom   the   Nazis   forced   to   perform;   generally,   the   Jews 

in the ghetto were compelled to be involved in "cultural" activities: there were two orchestras 

in Lwow during the Holocaust: in the ghetto and in the labor camp in Janowska. Their main role 

was to accompany the groups of prisoners on their way to and from work. The Nazi officers made 

the musicians play dances, marches like the “Radetzki March”, and classical music.

The orchestras were forced to play in very tragic moments, which were very frequent, sadly: 

until the liquidation of the ghetto (in June 1943) and of Janowska camp (in November 1943) - there 

were   deportations   to   Belzec   and   other  concentration   camps,   murders   (“akcje”),   epidemics   and 

devastating hunger. One of the most monstrous Nazi officers in Janowska - Richard Rukita (who 

had been a violinist before the German invasion.) used to murder immediately every orchestra 

3

  This  information  is  based   on  the  Lviv  Cemetery  Data  19411942,  p.  473,  no.  1369  (as  appears  on  the   website 



of JewishGen, 

http://www.jewishgen.org

 ) and on the Yad Vashem List of Persecuted Persons, among the Jews buried  

in the Jewish cemetery in Lwow, 1941-1942 (this is a copy of the document itself, in handwriting; from this document 

we can learn that Artur was murdered, and that later was buried by Jews).

13



 

M

 u z y k a l i a  XIII 



·  

Judaica 4

player who - in Rukita's opinion played out of tune.  Rukita forced the Jewish composer Schatz 

to arrange the popular Polish tango  Ostatnia niedziela  (Last Sunday) for the orchestra, and that 

tango - “the tango of death” – was played near the camp gates during the most bloodcurdling 

occasions.  According to Moshe Hokh’s book  Voices from the Darkness, the ghetto of Lwow and 

Janowska camp were among the cruelest ghettos and labor camps in Poland and Ukraine, and the 

voluntary musical (and generally cultural) activity was almost nonexistent.

These are the names of the musicians who perished in the ghetto and in Janowska camp: 

Marceli Horowitz, Jakub Mund, Józef Frenkel, the Striks brothers (composers), Schatz (composer); 

the   professors   from   the   music   academy:   Józef   Herman,   Edward   Steinberg,   Artur   Hermelin, 

Hildebrand, Breyer, Priwes, Aron Dobszyk, Mark Bauer, Teodor Pollak (the pianist who was the 

director of the music academy) and Leon Eber.

Toerien writes that poems and folk-songs from Lwow survived the Holocaust, as Jewish 

clerks   had   been   hiding   copies   of   them;   Toerien   adds   that   a   satirical   song   -  with   40   names 

of performing musicians in the ghetto (most probably in the tragic orchestra) - was published 

in “Gazetta Lwowska” - the newspaper which the Nazis distributed in the ghetto.

***

The Polish musicologist Michał Bristiger was Artur’s pupil in Lwow, in 1934 or 1935. 



Bristiger wrote about Artur:

I have studied piano with Artur Hermelin as a 14 or 15 years old teenager, perhaps in 1934 or 1935, but the lessons were 

interrupted because (as I remember) he left Lwow for Warsaw. I feel his artistic influence until now, and for me it still 

has value and beauty. He had a radiant personality and in his presence everyone was just infected with musical beauty.

14



 

M

 u z y k a l i a  XIII 



·  

Judaica 4

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Articles:

Gołąb, Maciej, “Józef Koffler: The First Polish Composer of Twelve-Tone Music”, Polish Music Journal of  

the Polish Music Center, University of Southern California, Vol. 6, No. 1, 2003.

Plohn, Alfred, “Jewish Music Life in Lwow”, Almanach Żydowski (Jewish Almanac), Lwow, 1936.

Stachel, Herman  [ed. for “Kultura i Sztuka” publishing house],  Almanach Żydowski  (Jewish Almanac), 

Lwow, 1937.



Critics’ reviews:



Epoka (Epoch) - Nov. 23

rd

, 1926, by Juliusz Wertheim.





Gazeta Lwow (Lwow Newspaper), date unknown, by Stefania Łobaczewska.



Gazeta Warszawska Poranna  (The Morning Warsaw Newspaper), Nov. 21

st

, 1926, by Piotr Rytel; 



Dec. 1

st

, 1926 by Piotr Rytel.





Gazetta Lwowska  (Lwow Newspaper  [the other one]), Year 1, No. 4, 1941: -  Poemat o muzyce 

(A poem about music), by. “Scherzo”.



Tydzień Polski (Polish Week), date unknown, by K.K. (?).



Tygodnik Ilustrowany (Illustrated Weekly), date unknown, by Karol Stromenger.



Lwowskie Wiadomosci Muzyczne i Literackie  (Lwow Music and Literature News), No. 8, 1926; 

and No. 1, 1927 – concert reviews.

Vasil Barvinsky’s concert-review from 1925.



Mateusz Gliński’s concert-review from 1926, Warsaw.



Books:

Dybowski, Stanisław, Slownik Pianistow Polskich [A Dictionary of Polish Pianists] (Warszawa, 2003).

Fater, IssacharJewish music in Poland between the World Wars (Tel Aviv, 1992).

Friedman,   Philip,  Extermination   of   the   Lvov   Jews.   Publications   of   the   Central   Jewish   Historical 

Commission of the Central Committee of Polish Jewry, No. 4.



Fuks, Marian, Straty osobowe żydowskiego środowiska muzycznego [The Destruction of the Jewish Musical  

Scene] (Warsaw: The Emanuel Ringelblum Jewish Historical Institute, date unknown.)

Hokh, MosheKolot Min Hakhoshekh [Voices from the darkness] (Jerusalem: Yad Vashem, 2002).

Labantsiw-Popko, Zinowia100 Galician pianists (Lviv, 2008).

Rappoport-Gelfand, LidiaMusical life in Poland: The post-war years 1945-1977 (Amsterdam, 1991).

Rogala, Jacek, Muzyka polska XX wieku [Polish Music in the 20

th

 Century], (Kraków, 2000).

Toerien,   Willem  Andre,  The   role   of   music,   performing   artists   and   composers   in   German-   controlled  

concentration camps and ghettos during world war II. M. Mus. Thesis at the University of Pretoria, 1993.

Photos:



Artur   Hermelin’s   photo   with   his   dedication   to   Eduard   Steuermann   (from  1927);   received   from 



Biblioteka Narodowa (The National Library), Warsaw.

15

Yüklə 267,22 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə