The Preparation of Composite Material of Graphene Oxide– Polystyrene



Yüklə 55.96 Kb.

tarix08.11.2018
ölçüsü55.96 Kb.


The Preparation of Composite Material of Graphene Oxide–

Polystyrene 

Jakub Tolasz 

1



, Václav Štengl 



1

 and Petra Ecorchard 

1

 

1



 Materials Chemistry Department, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry AS CR v.v.i.,  

250 68 Řež, Czech Republic 



Abstract.

  The  graphite  was  exfoliated  using  the  high  intensity  ultrasound.  From  the  delaminated 

nanosheets graphene oxide was prepared. Graphene oxide–polystyrene (GO–PS) composite was synthesized 

using direct emulsion polymerization of styrene in the presence of graphene oxide. The as-prepared samples 

were  characterized  by  X-ray  diffraction  (XRD),  Raman  spectroscopy  and  infrared  spectroscopy.  The 

morphology  of  prepared  composite  was  characterized  using  high  resolution  scanning  electron  microscopy 

(HRSEM). 

Keywords:

 graphene oxide, polystyrene, composite materials 



1.

 

Introduction 

The graphene oxide has proven to be soluble in water, is amphiphilic, non-toxic and biodegradable and 

form stable colloids. The surface of graphene oxide contains epoxy, hydroxyl, and carboxyl groups, which 

can interact with cations and anions. 

GO–polymer  composites  have  attracted  much  attention  due  to  their  unique  organic–inorganic  hybrid 

structure and exceptional properties. Core–shell structured polystyrene-magnetite-graphene oxide composite 

nanoparticles  were  synthesised  by  sequentially  depositing  Fe

3

O



4

  nanoparticles  and  GO  sheets  onto  the 

carboxyl  functionalized  PS  template  nanoparticles  through  electrostatic  interactions  [1].  Core–shell 

structured  polystyrene  microspherical  particles  were  synthesised  by  adsorbing  the  GO  sheets  on  the  PS 

surface  through  a  strong  π–π  stacking  interaction  [2].  Wu  [3]  report  the  synthesis  of  polystyrene  reduced 

graphene oxide composites by a two-step in situ reduction technique, which consisted of a hydrazine hydrate 

reduction and a subsequent thermal reduction at 200 °C for 12 h. A simple method was used to synthesize 

the  polyaniline  nanofiber-coated  polystyrene/graphene  oxide  (PANI-PS/GO)  core  shell  composite  using  a 

solution mixing process. GO could be easily coated on PANI-coated PS to form core shell structure through 

the ring-opening reaction of the epoxide groups in the GO sheets with amine groups in the PANI nanofibers 

[4].  Polystyrene  particles  covered  with  GO  sheets  of  nanoscale  size  have  been  successfully  prepared  by 

aqueous mini-emulsion polymerization of styrene using GO as the sole surfactant based on a novel procedure 

entailing  ox-idation  and  chemical  exfoliation  of  graphite  nano  fibres  [5].  Polystyrene-intercalated  GO  has 

been  prepared  by  emulsion  polymerization  with  the  aid  of  sodium  laurel  sulfate  and  polystyrene  has  been 

intercalated into the interlayers of GO [6]. Graphene oxide–polystyrene composite foaming was prepared by 

blending of solution polystyrene dissolved in dimethylformamide followed by CO

2

 supercritical drying [7]. 



Graphene  nanosheets–polystyrene  nanocomposites  were  prepared  by  in  situ  emulsion  polymerization  and 

reduction  of  graphene  oxide  using  hydrazine  hydrate.  PS  microspheres  covalently  linked  to  the  edges  of 

graphene  nanosheets  [8].  Yu  at  all  present  the  first  successful  application  of  p-phenylenediamine-

4vinylbenzen-polystyrene modified graphene oxide for application in corrosion protection [9]. 

                                                           

 



Corresponding author. Tel.: +420266172198; fax: +420220941502. 

   E-mail address: tolasz@iic.cas.cz. 

2014 3rd International Conference on Environment, Chemistry and Biology 

IPCBEE vol.78 (2014) © (2014) IACSIT Press, Singapore 

DOI: 10.7763/IPCBEE. 2014. V78. 9 

46



In this paper, we report on the synthesis of  graphene oxide–polystyrene (GO–PS) composites prepared 

by a one-step in situ direct emulsion polymerization of styrene in the presence of GO which leads to a new 

class of GO based materials and their use in a variety of applications. 

2.

 

Experimental 

2.1.

 Preparation of graphene 

The  graphene  was  synthesized  from  the  natural  graphite (Koh-i-noor  Grafite  Ltd.,  Czech  Republic)  by 

unique  method  reported  elsewhere  [10]  using  a  high  intensity  cavitation  field  in  an  ultrasonic  pressurized 

batch reactor (UIP1000hd, 20kHz, 2000W, Hielscher Ultrasonics GmbH, 14513 Teltow, Germany). 



2.2. 

Preparaton of grapheme oxide 

The graphene oxide (GO) was prepared from graphene using the modified Hummers method [11]. In a 

typical experiment, H

2

SO



4

 (60 ml), H

3

PO

4



 (10 ml), graphene (1 g), and KMnO

4

 (3 g) were mixed in a round-



bottom flask. The mixture was then heated to 40 °C and stirred for 6 h, affording a pink, dense suspension. 

The suspension was then poured onto a mixture of ice and 30% H

2

O

2



 (200 ml), and the color turned to bright 

yellow.  The  product  was  purified  by  dialysis  (Spectra/Por  3  dialysis  membrane)  and  centrifuged.  Purified 

GO product was obtained as a brown, honey-like suspension. 

2.3.

 Preparation of grapheme oxide polystyrene composite 

GO–PS  was  prepared  by  direct  emulsion  polymerization  of  styrene  [12]  in  the  presence  of  GO.  In  a 

typical  experiment,  0.3  g  of  GO  was  dispersed  in  75  ml  of  distilled  water  in  a  4-neck  round-bottom  flask 

fitted with mechanical stirrer, condenser, thermometer and nitrogen inlet. The suspension of graphene oxide 

was purged by inert gas (nitrogen or argon) for 10 minutes due to the removal of oxygen, beacuse it inhibits 

free  radical  polymerization.  Then,  a  mixture  of  5  ml  of  styrene  and  0.1  ml  divinylbenzene  was  added  and 

reaction  mixture  was  heated.  When  the  reaction  mixture  warmed  to  91  °C,  2  mL  solution  of  sodium  

4-styrenesulfonate  is  added  (4.00  g  of  sodium  4-styrenesulfonate  in  100.0  mL  water)  and  then,  after 

3  minutes  the  4  mL  of  the  solution  of  potassium  persulfate  and  sodium  bicarbonate  (1g  K

2

S



2

O

8



  and  

3.5 g NaHCO

3

 in 100 ml water) was added. The reaction mixture is continuously stirred and heated. After  



85  min  a  mixture  of  1  ml  styrene,  0.05  ml  divinylbenzene,  4  ml  of  water,  4  ml  solution  of  sodium  

4-styrenesulfonate, and 0.5 mL of the solution of potassium persulfate and sodium bicarbonate  were added; 

heating and stirring continuos next hour. After cooling of mixture, it was filtered and purged with ethanol. 

Thereafter the composite material was dried at 85 °C. 



2.4. 

Characterisation methods 

Diffraction  patterns  were  collected  with  diffractometer  Bruker  D2  equipped  with  conventional  X-ray 

tube (Cu Kα radiation, 30 kV, 10 mA).  The primary divergence slit module width 0.6 mm, Soller Module 

2.5, Airscatter screen module 2 mm, Ni Kbeta-filter 0.5 mm, step 0.00405°, a counting time per a step  1 s 

and the LYNXEYE 1-dimensional detector were used.  

High  resolution  scanning  electron  microscopy  (HRSEM)  analysis  was  conducted  on  a  FEI    Nova 

NanoSEM scanning electron microscope equipped with an Everhart-Thornley detector (ETD), Through Lens 

detector  (TLD),  Low  Vacuum  detection  (LVD)  HELIX  and  sample  plasma  cleaner  using  accelerating 

voltage 4-30 kV. Samples on the carbon holder were coated with a thin gold layer using vacuum sputtering. 

The  Raman  spectra  were  acquired  with  DXR  Raman  microscope  (Thermo  Scientific)  with  532  nm 

(6 mW) laser, 32 two-second scans under 10x objective of an Olympus microscope. 

Infrared spectra were recorded using Nicolet Impact 400D spectrometer approximately in 4000-500 cm

-1

 

range with accessories for diffuse reflectance measurement. 



3.

 

Results and Discussion 

The scheme of GO–PS composite preparation method is outlined Figure 1a. The XRD pattern of GO and 

GO–PS  composite  is  displayed  in  Figure  1b.  The  GO  pattern  showed  a  characteristic  peak  at  9.35° 

corresponding to an interlayer spacing of 0.945 nm, indicating the presence of oxygen and oxygen containing 

47



functional groups (-COOH, -OH, C-O-C) after oxidation [13]. Very strong peak at 3.17°, indicated preferred 

orientation of GO [14]. The XRD pattern of GO–PS composite showed two main broadening peaks. The first 

at 11.55° is the polymerization peak and was attributed to the intermolecular backbone–backbone correlation 

and the size of the side group, which corresponds to an approximately hexagonal ordering of the molecular 

chains; the latter peak at 18.7° was amorphous halo and corresponds to the van der Waals distance [15]. 

Fig. 1: a) Scheme of preparation of graphene oxide-polystyrene composite and 

b) XRD pattern of grapene oxide and graphene oxide-polystyrene composite 

The DRIFT spectrum of GO is shown in the Figure  2a. The broad, intense band centered at 3450 cm

-1

 

was assigned to O-H stretching vibrations of the C-OH groups and the bands at 1737 cm



-1

 were assigned to 

C=O stretching vibrations of the carbonyl and carboxylic groups. The band at 1630 cm

-1

 was due to skeletal 



vibrations  from  unoxidised  graphitic  domains,  the  peak  at  1224  cm

-1

  was  expression  of  C-OH  stretching 



while  the  peak  at  1050  cm

-1

  was  assigned  to  C-O  stretching  vibrations.  The  main  vibration  modes  of 



polystyrene,  out-of-plane  bending  of  the  CH  groups  in  the  aromatic  ring  were  located  at  699  cm

-1



deformation vibrations of the CH groups in the aromatic ring at 754 cm

-1

, v(C=C) vibration in vinyl groups 



at 1447 and 1490 cm

-1

, stretching vibrations of the carbons in the aromatic ring at 1601 cm



-1

, vibration of PS 

units  at  1942  cm

-1

,  symmetrical  and  asymmetrical  stretching  vibrations    of  the  CH



2

  groups  at  2848  and 

2921 cm

-1

 and stretching vibrations of the CH groups in the aromatic ring at 3024 and 3062 cm



-1

Fig. 2: a) Infrared spectra of graphene oxide–polystyrene composite and its components 



b) Raman spectrum of grapene oxide, polystyrene and graphene oxide–polystyrene composite 

The  Raman  spectrum  of  GO,  PS  and  GO–PS  composite  is  presented  in  Figure  2b.  In  the  Raman 

spectrum of the GO, the G band is broadened and shifted slightly to 1605 cm

-1

, whereas the intensity of the D 



band  at  1347  cm

-1

  increases  substantially.  The  G  band  is  common  to  all  sp



2

  carbon  forms  and  provides 

48



information on the in-plane vibration of sp

2

 bonded carbon atoms and the D band suggests the presence of 



sp

3

 defects [16]. In the Raman spectrum of GO–PS, the C-H stretch mode in the vinyl group at 3054 cm



-1

 and 


C-C stretch vibration in benzene at 995 cm

-1

 was detected [17]. 



Figure  3a  shows  the  SEM  images  of  the  GO–PS  composite,  which  clearly  displays  the  bulk  of  small 

balls  in  composite.  The  polymer  and  GO  form  an  interconnected  bulk  network  and  the  GO  is  uniformly 

dispersed  in  the  polystyrene  matrix.  The  small  balls  of  polystyrene  whose  surface  are  covered  by  GO  are 

clearly seen in Figure 3b at a higher magnification. 

Fig. 3: SEM images of graphene oxide–polystyrene composite a) scale 3 µm, b) scale 500 nm. 

4.

 

Conclusions 

The  composite  material  of  graphene  oxide–polystyrene  was  prepared  by  directly  synthesis  at  the 

laboratory scale. The composite is relatively stable and synthesis is quite well reproducible, which the X-ray 

and  Raman  measurements  confirmed.  However,  the  distribution  of  individual  composite  parts  is  located 

randomly. Potential applications of this composite material GO-PS lies primarily in the possibility of use as a 

sorbent for heavy metals, radionuclides, and other trace elements. These abilities, however, must be validated 

by long-term tests. 

5.

 

Acknowledgements 

This work was supported by Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports No.CZ.105/3.1.00/14.0328 

 

6.

 

References 

[1]


 

Wang, J., et al., Synthesis, characterization and adsorption properties of superparamagnetic polysty-

rene/Fe3O4/graphene oxide. Chemical Engineering Journal 2012, 204: 258-263. 

[2]


 

Zhang, W.L., Y.D. Liu, and H.J. Choi, Graphene oxide coated core-shell structured polystyrene microspheres and 

their electrorheological characteristics under applied electric field. Journal of Materials Chemistry 2011, 13 (19): 

6916-6921. 

49



[3]

 

Wu, N., et al., Synthesis of network reduced graphene oxide in polystyrene matrix by a two-step reduction method 



for superior conductivity of the composite. Journal of Materials Chemistry 2012, 22(33): 17254-17261. 

[4]


 

Grinou, A., Y. Yun, and H.-J. Jin, Polyaniline nanofiber-coated polystyrene/graphene oxide core-shell micro-

sphere composites. Macromolecular Research 2012, 20(1): 84-92. 

[5]


 

Che Man, S.H., et al., Synthesis of polystyrene nanoparticles “armoured” with nanodimensional graphene ox-ide 

sheets by miniemulsion polymerization. Journal of Polymer Science Part A: Polymer Chemistry 2013, 51(1): 

47-58. 


[6]

 

Ding, R., et al., Preparation and characterization of polystyrene/graphite oxide nanocomposite by emulsion 



polymerization. Polymer Degradation and Stability 2003, 81(3): 473-476. 

[7]


 

Yang, J., et al., Preparation, characterization, and supercritical carbon dioxide foaming of polysty-rene/graphene 

oxide composites. The Journal of Supercritical Fluids 2011, 56(2): 201-207. 

[8]


 

Hu, H., et al., Preparation and properties of graphene nanosheets–polystyrene nanocomposites via in situ emulsion 

polymerization. Chemical Physics Letters 2010, 484(4–6): 247-253. 

[9]


 

Yu, Y.-H., et al., High-performance polystyrene/graphene-based nanocomposites with excellent anti-corrosion 

properties. Polymer Chemistry 2014, 5(2): 535-550. 

[10]


 

Štengl, V., Preparation of Graphene by Using an Intense Cavitation Field in a Pressurized Ultrasonic Reactor. 



Chemistry – A European Journal 2012, 18(44): 14047-14054. 

[11]


 

Hummers, W.S. and R.E. Offeman, Preparation of Graphitic Oxide. Journal of the American Chemical Socie-ty 

1958, 80(6): 1339-1339. 

[12]


 

Sunkara, H.B., J.M. Jethmalani, and W.T. Ford, Synthesis of crosslinked poly(styrene-co-sodium styrenesulfonate) 

latexes. Journal of Polymer Science Part A: Polymer Chemistry 1994, 32(8): 1431-1435. 

[13]


 

Wang, D.-W., et al., A water-dielectric capacitor using hydrated graphene oxide film. Journal of Materials 



Chemistry 2012, 22(39): 21085-21091. 

[14]


 

Blanton, T.N. and D. Majumdar, X-ray diffraction characterization of polymer intercalated graphite oxide. Powder 



Diffraction 2012, 27(02): 104-107. 

[15]


 

Wu, N., et al., Synthesis of network reduced graphene oxide in polystyrene matrix by a two-step reduction method 

for superior conductivity of the composite. Journal of Materials Chemistry 2012, 22(33): 17254-17261. 

[16]


 

Chen, C., et al., Synthesis of Visible-Light Responsive Graphene Oxide/TiO2 Composites with p/n Heterojunction. 



ACS Nano 2010, 4(11): 6425-6432. 

[17]


 

Sears, W.M., J.L. Hunt, and J.R. Stevens, Raman scattering from polymerizing styrene. I. Vibrational mode 



analysis. The Journal of Chemical Physics 1981, 75(4): 1589-1598. 

50



Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə