Thomas reilly



Yüklə 128,65 Kb.

tarix20.09.2017
ölçüsü128,65 Kb.


POSITION STATEMENT

Coping with jet-lag: A Position Statement for the European College of

Sport Science

THOMAS REILLY

1

, GREG ATKINSON



1

, BEN EDWARDS

1

, JIM WATERHOUSE



1

,

TORBJO



¨ RN A˚KERSTEDT

2

, DAMIEN DAVENNE



3

, BJO


¨ RN LEMMER

4

, &



ANNA WIRZ-JUSTICE

5

1



Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK,

2

Department of Public



Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden,

3

Centre de Recherches en Activite´s Physiques et Sportives,



University of Caen, Caen, France,

4

Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ruprecht-Karls-Universiteit Heidelberg,



Heidelberg, Germany, and

5

Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric University Clinics, Basel, Switzerland



Abstract

Elite athletes and their coaches are accustomed to international travel for purposes of training or sports competition.

Recreational participants are similarly, if less frequently, exposed to travel stress. Transient negative effects that constitute

travel fatigue are quickly overcome, whereas longer-lasting difficulties are associated with crossing multiple time-zones.

Jet-lag is linked with desynchronization of circadian rhythms, and its impact depends on the duration and direction of flight,

flight schedule, and individual differences. Athletes’ performances are likely to be affected for some days until the body clock

is readjusted in harmony with local time. Knowledge of the physiological characteristics of the body clock can be used to

develop behavioural strategies that accelerate readjustment, in particular the timing of outdoor or bright light exposure,

perhaps melatonin ingestion, meals, and exercise. Attempts to promote sleep by use of drugs that adjust the body clock,

induce sleepiness or promote wakefulness are relevant but discouraged in travelling athletes. Support staff should develop

appropriate education programmes for their athletes who can then make informed choices about their behaviour and

minimize the transient effects of jet-lag on their well-being and performance.

Keywords: Chronobiology, circadian rhythms, fatigue, sleep, travel

Introduction

Contemporary elite athletes are frequent travellers

across multiple time-zones. These journeys are

undertaken to participate in club or international

competition in single engagements or for more

prolonged sojourns when tournaments are involved.

In other instances, groups of athletes or members of

sports teams take advantage of altitude or seasonal

differences in weather conditions to attend training

camps in other parts of the world where the climate

is more conducive to strenuous exercise. Professional

athletes based in Europe, such as soccer players, may

incur a competitive schedule that includes interna-

tional representation for their country on another

continent (Asia, America or Australia) in between

important domestic contests for the club. Such

itineraries place a physiological and psychological

burden on those athletes who have to adjust to a

different time-zone and a different climate and then

have to re-adjust back to their home time-zone after

the return journey.

Irrespective of the mode of transport, travelling

can cause discomfort and fatigue. The passenger

may become stiff as a result of being in a cramped

posture for too long during an air flight or a journey

by car or omnibus. There may be stresses associated

with the journey, delays, unplanned stops or detours.

With flights there are also the problems caused by

hypoxia. The fatigue and dehydration that result are

transitory and can be remedied on arrival by

rehydration, a rest or light exercise, and a shower

or bath. This form of tiredness or ‘‘travel fatigue’’

Correspondence: T. Reilly, Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, 15

Á21 Webster Street,

Liverpool L3 2ET, UK. E-mail: t.p.reilly@ljmu.ac.uk

European Journal of Sport Science, March 2007; 7(1): 1

Á7

ISSN 1746-1391 print/ISSN 1536-7290 online # 2007 European College of Sport Science



DOI: 10.1080/17461390701216823


(see Table I) is experienced when flying directly

northwards or southwards, for example from main-

land Europe to South Africa or from Canada to

South America.

Travel fatigue accompanies any long journey, but

a unique syndrome known as jet-lag is induced when

long-haul flights entail crossing multiple meridians.

Symptoms (see Table II) are due to a mismatch

between ‘‘body clock time’’ and the new local time.

The body clock gradually adapts to local time in the

new environment and when this process is complete

the symptoms of jet-lag disappear (Lemmer, Kern,

Nold, & Lohrer, 2002; Reilly, Atkinson, & Water-

house, 1997). Since jet-lag can have a negative

influence on exercise performance (Waterhouse,

Reilly, & Atkinson, 1997), and on the mood and

performance of accompanying support personnel

(Waterhouse et al., 2002a; Waterhouse, Minors,

Waterhouse, Reilly, & Atkinson, 2002b), the provi-

sion of travel guidelines to sports participants is

worthwhile.

In these guidelines, we first explain the nature of

circadian rhythms that are controlled by the body

clock. This outline is necessary for an understanding

of the behaviour of the body clock when rhythms are

desynchronized, which occurs in nocturnal shift-

work as well as time-zone transitions. Methods

commonly promoted for alleviating jet-lag and

hastening adjustment to the new time-zone are

considered and evaluated. Strategies designed to

help deal with itineraries depend on the direction

of flight, times of departure and arrival, and mission

objectives. Advice can also be given regarding sleep

loss. These strategies need to be translated into

compact recommendations to be of practical benefit

to athletes and their medical and scientific mentors.

The body clock

The body clock is located within the suprachiasmatic

nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus. The retino-

hypothalamic tract and the intergeniculate leaflet

provide input pathways from the retina (photic

signals) and other regions of the brain (non-photic)

to the timekeeping cells of the SCN. These act as

‘‘Zeitgebers’’ or synchronizing agents for the endo-

genous rhythmicity that is usually somewhat longer

than 24 h. A multi-synaptic pathway from the SCN

leads to the pineal gland, where melatonin is

secreted at night and suppressed by light.

Natural light is the predominant Zeitgeber for the

body clock, though less bright, artificial light also

exerts an effect. This means that light in the morning

can advance circadian rhythms to earlier, and light in

the evening can delay circadian rhythms to later.

This concept, that of a ‘‘phase-response curve’’,

provides the practical basis for timing light exposure

to attain more rapid shifts across time zones going

east (advance) or west (delay). Melatonin receptors

are found on the SCN, which means that exogenous

melatonin can also act as a Zeitgeber to shift the

biological clock. The phase-response curve to mel-

atonin is opposite to that for light: melatonin in

the evening can advance circadian rhythms to ear-

lier, whereas melatonin in the morning can delay

circadian rhythms to later (Cajochen, Kra¨uchi, &

Wirz-Justice, 2003). Additionally, melatonin has

direct effects on thermoregulation, which may be

the mechanism by which it induces sleepiness

(Atkinson et al., 2003; Kra¨uchi, Cajochen, & Wirz-

Justice, 2005). Vasodilation in the hands and feet

occurs rapidly after melatonin ingestion during the

day, or at the natural time of melatonin secretion

onset in the evening, and warm hands and feet are

the physiological ‘‘gate’’ promoting sleep onset.

Conversely, the direct effects of light to inhibit

melatonin secretion also lead to distal vasonconstric-

tion, with a concomitant increase in alertness

(Kra¨uchi et al., 2005). Light also promotes wakeful-

Table I. Checklist for travel fatigue (based on Waterhouse et al.,

2002b).

Symptoms


Fatigue

Disorientation

Headaches

‘‘Travel weariness’’

Causes

Disruption of normal routine



Hassles associated with travel (checking in, baggage claim,

customs clearance)

Dehydration due to dry cabin air

Advice


Before the journey

Plan the journey well in advance

Try to arrange for any stopover to be comfortable

Be clear about documentation, inoculations, visas, etc.

Make arrangements for activity at your destination

During the flight

Take some roughage (e.g. apples) to eat

Drink plenty of water or fruit juice; avoid tea, coffee, and

alcohol

On reaching your destination



Relax with a non-alcoholic drink

Take a shower

Take a brief nap, if feeling exhausted

Table II. Symptoms of jet-lag (based on Waterhouse et al., 1997).

.

Feeling tired in the new local daytime, and yet unable



to sleep at night

.

Waking in the new night, and unable to get back to sleep



.

Feeling less able to concentrate or to motivate oneself

.

Decreased mental and physical performance



.

Increased incidence of headaches and irritability

.

Loss of appetite and general bowel irregularities



2

T. Reilly et al.




ness, not only through this mechanism but also

directly through the sympathetic nervous system.

Circadian rhythms and the sleep

Á

wake cycle



While the rhythm of core body temperature is

regarded as a good marker of the circadian system,

many other physiological functions exhibit such 24-h

cycles. However, in addition to the body clock, many

measures are also affected by the duration of prior

time awake. This phenomenon is called the ‘‘sleep

homeostat’’, and it is the interactions between the

two processes that are important for behaviour.

Performance measures tend to follow closely the

rhythm in core body temperature.

Drust and colleagues (Drust, Waterhouse, Atkin-

son, Edwards, & Reilly, 2005) pointed out that many

indices of sports performance had both a 24-h

component (which would be parallel to the rhythm

in core temperature) in addition to a component

synchronous with the sleep

Áwake cycle. These two

components are desynchronized after travelling

across multiple time-zones, so that a deterioration

in exercise and any other performance is likely to

accompany this disruption of the body clock with

respect to sleep timing. Besides, the symptoms of jet-

lag (particularly those due to loss of sleep) are likely

to have a de-motivating effect that will in turn impair

performance.

Factors affecting jet-lag

The severity of jet-lag depends on the number of

time-zones crossed and on the direction of travel.

Symptoms are felt more acutely after travelling

eastwards than after travelling westwards due to

the greater ease of effecting a phase delay (i.e. to

follow the longer-than-24-h endogenous rhythmicity

of the body clock by drifting later). Allowing one day

for each time-zone crossed for travellers to adjust

seems to accommodate most people irrespective

of the direction of travel (Waterhouse, Reilly, &

Edwards, 2004), in particular where strategies to

accelerate the readjustment are respected.

Although there are differences between individuals

in their sensitivity to jet-lag, these differences appear

to be small. Physical fitness may be beneficial, due

either to its sleep-promoting effects or its association

with mental toughness to cope with subjective

discomfort. Younger individuals (notably athletes)

may have a capability to cope better with circadian

desynchronization, while older travellers (notably

support personnel) derive benefit from experience

of previous trips. Surprisingly, the young experience

greater sleepiness and performance deficits with

sleep deprivation than the old

Á who are already

slower during the day (Blatter et al., 2006). Habitual

female travellers may experience secondary amenor-

rhoea but the lifestyle of female athletes entails

frequent but not habitual travelling. Morning-

type individuals would have a theoretical advantage

in

adjusting



to eastward

travel, and evening-

types to a westward flight, but the majority of

athletes are intermediate in chronotype (Waterhouse

et al., 2004).

For time-zone transitions approaching 12 h (to-

wards the antipodes), there is some evidence that

splitting the journey into 2 days with an overnight

stopover can lessen the subjective symptoms experi-

enced (Reilly & Waterhouse, 2005). Such stopovers

may not be feasible in the case of sports groups for

logistic and financial reasons, or because of losing

training opportunities. While travel strategies can be

designed to deal with itineraries that are imposed on

the athletes concerned, it is preferable to have a

choice of departure and arrival times, and alternative

carriers. Coping strategies are easier to implement

Table III. Recommendations for the use of bright light to adjust

the body clock after time-zone transitions (from Reilly et al.,

2005).


Bad local times for

exposure to light

Good local times for

exposure to light

Local time

Local time

Time zones to the west (h)

3

02:00



Á08:00

a

18:00



Á24:00

b

4



01:00

Á07:00


a

17:00


Á23:00

b

5



24:00

Á06:00


a

16:00


Á22:00

b

6



23:00

Á05:00


a

15:00


Á21:00

b

7



22:00

Á04:00


a

14:00


Á20:00

b

8



21:00

Á03:00


a

13:00


Á19:00

b

9



20:00

Á02:00


a

12:00


Á18:00

b

10



19:00

Á01:00


a

11:00


Á17:00

b

11



18:00

Á00:00


a

10:00


Á16:00

b

12



17:00

Á23:00


a

09:00


Á15:00

b

13



16:00

Á22:00


a

08:00


Á14:00

b

14



15:00

Á21:00


a

07:00


Á13:00

b

15



14:00

Á20:00


a

06:00


Á12:00

b

16



13:00

Á19:00


a

05:00


Á11:00

b

Time zones to the east (h)



3

24:00


Á06:00

b

08:00



Á14:00

a

4



01:00

Á07:00


b

09:00


Á15:00

a

5



02:00

Á08:00


b

10:00


Á16:00

a

6



03:00

Á09:00


b

11:00


Á17:00

a

7



04:00

Á10:00


b

12:00


Á18:00

a

8



05:00

Á11:00


b

13:00


Á19:00

a

9



06:00

Á12:00


b

14:00


Á20:00

a

10



Can be treated as 14 h

to the west

c

11

Can be treated as 13 h



to the west

c

12



Can be treated as 12 h

to the west

c

a

Denotes promotion of a phase advance.



b

Denotes a delay of the body clock.

c

Reflects that the body clock adjusts to large delays more easily



than to large advances.

Coping with jet-lag: A Position Statement

3



when arrival times at destination are in the late

afternoon or evening (Waterhouse et al., 2002a). In

these cases, individuals have the opportunity to take

a full sleep at night in the new time-zone sooner after

arrival. Cultural differences in the country of desti-

nation do not affect jet-lag but the climate encoun-

tered may do so. A high environmental temperature

can accentuate the dehydration following a long-haul

flight due to the dry cabin air, and hypoxia at altitude

could compound subjective discomfort for athletes

travelling across time-zones to training venues at

altitude.

Dealing with jet-lag

The trip should be planned so as to arrive a number

of days before the competition. This period will vary

in accordance with the number of time-zone transi-

tions experienced. Strategies for minimizing the

effects of jet-lag embrace activities pre-flight, while

on board the aircraft, and following arrival in the

new destination. Pre-flight factors include planning

details of the journey and adjustment of the sleep

Á

wake cycle in accordance with the direction of flight.



Adjustment of more than 2 h in retiring to bed is

counterproductive since this change is liable to cause

rhythm disturbance and impair the quality of train-

ing undertaken before departure (Reilly & Maskell,

1989). Planning the trip can include the times

during flight when sleep is attempted (see below)

and what meals are taken and/or missed.

It has been suggested that once the aircraft is

boarded, the travellers should set their watches and

begin to live (eat and sleep) in agreement with the

local time at destination (Waterhouse et al., 2004).

The dry air on board the aircraft can cause a gradual

dehydration that is not perceived by the body.

Passengers are therefore advised to drink more

than expected to counteract this added fluid loss.

Water and fruit juices are recommended, and

diuretics such as alcohol and caffeine discouraged.

Periodically getting up to walk in the aisles, or do

light stretching exercises, will alleviate joint stiffness

and safeguard against deep vein thrombosis (House

of Lords Select Committee, 2000). Compression

stockings also have a protective effect against deep

vein thrombosis. Sleep and naps during the journey

should be attempted only if it is night at the final

destination; if this is not the case, then conversation

or investigating the in-flight entertainment is ad-

vised. Sleep may be assisted by wearing eye-shades

and ear plugs and wearing loose-fitting clothing.

The more appropriate behaviour on arrival at

destination will depend on the direction of flight,

the number of time-zones crossed, and the time of

arrival. Separate strategies can be devised for east-

ward and westward travel. Generic therapies such as

massage may have transient value in reversing the

effects of having been sitting in a cramped position

but have no direct impact on the body clock.

Similarly, there is little evidence for feeding pro-

grammes that promote protein intake in the morning

and mainly carbohydrate in the evening to hasten

adjustment to the new time; the timing of the meal to

fit in with habitual routines in the new environment

is more likely to help readjustment of the body

clock than is the macronutrient content (Reilly &

Waterhouse, 2005). However, carbohydrates in the

morning appear to advance circadian rhythms com-

pared with carbohydrates in the evening meal

(Kra¨uchi, Cajochen, Werth, & Wirz-Justica 2002),

so more research on this theme of food as Zeitgeber

is required. Adequate fluid ingestion is recom-

mended and caffeine can help in combating sleep-

iness when experienced during the day. Although

this arousal effect of caffeine is beneficial during the

day while the body clock is being readjusted, there

can be unwanted effects of evening ingestion on

recovery sleep (Beaumont et al., 2004). Exercise,

especially outdoors if it is a sunny day, can also have

a positive effect on arousal, but morning exercise

should be avoided for a few days after an eastward

flight when it could induce a counter-productive

phase-delay response (Edwards, Waterhouse, Atkin-

son, & Reilly, 2002). In any case, exercise training

should be taken at the time of day of the future

competition, the sooner after the flight the better.

During the first training sessions, maximal exercise

and risky manoeuvres should be avoided to prevent

injuries. Exercising outdoors also helps the body to

adjust to the new environment (especially when

temperature and humidity are high).

Although benzodiazepines and non-benzodiaze-

pine soporifics have been advocated for inducing

sleep, and some benzodiazepines may act as chron-

obiotics (change the phase of the body clock), their

benefits are not universally confirmed. Jet-lag re-

ported by British Olympic athletes after a 5-h time-

zone transition westward was unaffected by ingestion

of temazepam (Reilly, Atkinson, & Budgett, 2001).

A similar ineffective treatment using zopiclone was

reported for a French group making a westward trip

of the same phase-shift to Martinique (Daurat,

Benoit, & Buguet, 2000). Moreover, these drugs

have myorelaxant effects that can last longer than the

hypnotic effects and might be dangerous when

exercising.

Melatonin is a special case. Its vasodilatory effects

do promote sleep without having any marked effects

on the sleep EEG (in contrast to benzodiazepines)

(Cajochen et al., 2003). However, the purity of

melatonin bought ‘‘off-the-shelf ’’ and without pre-

scription (where available) cannot be guaranteed.

It can also have unwanted side-effects in some

4

T. Reilly et al.




individuals (Reilly, Maughan, & Budgett, 1998).

The position is complicated in so far as melatonin,

and possibly some benzodiazepines, can act as

chronobiotics. While such an adjustment using

melatonin could be beneficial, it must be in the

required direction (a phase advance or delay follow-

ing a flight to the east or west, respectively).

For any chronobiotic drug, the direction in which

the body clock is shifted depends on the time of

ingestion. In practice, ingestion is normally in the

evening in the new time-zone (to promote sleep), so

this is appropriate for adjusting the body clock only

after some flights. Experimental data as to a phase-

shifting role in field conditions are lacking. In other

words, the chronobiotic

Á as opposed to the sopori-

fic

Á value of these substances is unclear.



Athletes must be protected against the ingestion of

drugs on the banned list of the International

Olympic Committee and sports governing bodies.

Hence, drugs such as modafinil, methylphenidate,

and pemoline that are viable antidotes to fatigue in a

civilian or military context have no place in treating

the effects of sleep loss due to jet-lag.

Bright light also can adjust the body clock and it

opposes the action of melatonin. Therefore, seeking

exposure to natural daylight and avoiding bright light

at the appropriate times is important in determining

the rate of readjustment to the new time-zone. Again

the timing of such behaviours is crucial and the

phase-response curve to light should therefore be

taken into consideration. Guidelines for the best and

worst time for exposure to light are shown in Table II

according to the direction of travel and the number

of time-zones crossed. The availability of artificial

indoor lighting should also be considered where

these guidelines are being implemented; sitting

near a window amounts to exposure to bright light,

whereas sitting in a dimly lit room away from

windows amounts to avoiding bright light.

Recommendations

The following recommendations are based on ob-

servations on elite athletes and other travellers

(Reilly, Waterhouse, & Edwards, 2005; Waterhouse

et al., 1997, 2002a). While travel strategies are best

designed for specific journeys and activity schedules,

general principles can be applied based on the

direction of flight and the number of meridians

crossed. A checklist for planning purposes was

presented by Waterhouse et al. (2004) and is

updated in Table I. Adherence to such forward

planning should ensure that the individual arrives

in good time at the point of departure, rested, and

free of anxieties about the trip.

During the flight

Travellers are encouraged to prepare for their own

comfort, as far as possible, in advance of boarding

the flight. Tall persons flying economy class might

enquire at check-in on the most suitable seats

available for them. For all passengers, wearing

appropriate loose-fitting clothing should contribute

to comfort on board. Relaxation can be planned for

the hours between meals and, depending on the

timing of the flight, some meals can be missed.

Emphasis needs to be placed on fluid intake,

avoiding diuretics such as coffee and alcohol.

‘‘Travellers’ thrombosis’’ is now recognized as a

risk when individuals are in a cramped position

without activity for a prolonged period. Periodic

activity, approximately every 2 h, can include iso-

metric exercises, walks along the aisles or stretching

exercises. Compression stockings have been advo-

cated for preventive purposes. Drugs such as aspirin

have anti-thrombotic properties but are not univer-

sally prescribed due to the possibility of side-effects

in some individuals.

After travelling westwards

On long-haul flights westward, a short nap may be of

benefit. The theoretical value of this short sleep is

that it reduces the homeostatic drive towards sleepi-

ness that initially occurs with an extended first day of

travel.

A flight westwards requires a phase delay of the



body clock. It is important to remain active during

the daytime and avoid long naps. Napping can

contrive to anchor the body clock to the time-

zone departed and have a counterproductive effect

(Minors & Waterhouse, 1981). Light exercise can

have a positive benefit, help to maintain arousal, and

offer transient relief of jet-lag symptoms (Edwards

et al., 2002). Social activity and fitting in with local

time can facilitate exposure to Zeitgebers, particu-

larly the light

Ádark cycle, supporting the readjust-

ment of the body clock and the restoration of normal

circadian rhythms.

It is acceptable to retire to bed 1

Á2 h earlier than

normal according to local time. Conversely, waking

up may occur earlier than normal in the new time-

zone. The changes in sleep

Áwake cycles are transient

and normal sleeping patterns tend to be restored

before

the rhythm in internal body tempera-



ture returns to its normal circadian phase (Reilly

et al., 2001).

After travelling eastwards

When travelling through the night, a period of quiet

is scheduled by airlines to allow possibilities for

Coping with jet-lag: A Position Statement

5



sleep. Typically, flights eastwards from Europe to

Asia and Australia are overnight. The most likely

times for sleep coincide with night in the time-zone

just left, but the most appropriate time is during

darkness in the time-zone at destination. On long-

haul flights eastward that total 20

Á22 h, travelling

athletes tend to obtain about 4 h sleep in total

(Waterhouse et al., 2004). Although the duration of

sleep during flight is not correlated with jet-lag

symptoms subsequently experienced, it does have a

recuperative value (the homeostatic component) and

possibly begins the process of adjustment to the new

time-zone.

Adherence to the phase-response curve to light is a

key to resynchronizing circadian rhythms after flying

eastwards. In this instance, a phase-advance of the

body clock is required. The strategy therefore is to

exploit the positive effects of natural light, but only

after the trough of the body temperature is reached.

The problem arising after crossing many time-zones

(e.g. 6


Á9 h) to the east is that a morning arrival may

coincide with body clock time that precedes this

trough. In such instances, use of light shades in the

plane and dark glasses en route to the immediate

accommodation can minimize light exposure and

allow the traveller to retire to bed until late morning

if necessary after arriving, having hurried to the new

accommodation to do so. As Table II indicates, light

exposure in the new afternoon is beneficial.

Based on the same chronobiological principle,

morning

training


should

be

avoided



for

the


first few days under these circumstances. In con-

trast, exercise in the late afternoon would be

beneficial.

In flights eastwards over nine or more time-zones,

it is possible that the body clock adjusts by means of

a phase delay rather than a phase advance (Water-

house et al., 2002a). This is more likely if there is

exposure to bright light in the morning and/or the

traveller is ingesting melatonin in the evenings before

bedtime. For such eventualities, a behavioural and

concerted light exposure/avoidance strategy can be

implemented (see Table II). It must be realized that,

on the day of arrival, minimum temperature and

performance will be in the late afternoon (about

05:00 h by time in the departure zone). Adjusting

the body clock by phase advance will cause this nadir

to advance through the afternoon and morning. In

contrast, if the body clock adjusts by delaying, then

the nadir soon moves to the later afternoon and

evening. These differences due to the direction of

adjustment have implications for training and pre-

paration for matches. They should be borne in mind

when considering the timing of the scheduled

competitive engagements.

Overview

These guidelines are designed to help travelling

athletes and any accompanying support staff to

adjust quickly to new locations after long-haul

flights. They are based on chronobiological princi-

ples and an understanding of how the body clock

operates. Knowledge of the underlying physiology

provides an insight into the impact of travel on

circadian rhythms, well-being, and exercise perfor-

mance. To ensure quality of performance, travel

strategies must be actively managed and sports

organizations should recognize the likely negative

effects of jet-lag on the performance of athletes. An

effective education programme would enable travel-

ling athletes to make informed choices about their

travel plans and adopt appropriate behaviours to

minimize discomfort. Modification of behaviour to

suit the progressive adjustment to the new time-zone

is preferred to using chronobiotic or soporific drugs.

Since there is no physiological adaptation on repe-

titive time-zone transitions, each long-haul journey is

unique and requires its own specific travel strategy,

based on direction of travel, duration, and times of

embarkation and disembarkation. Most important of

all for competitive sport, is to allow a sufficient

number of days in the new time zone to attain re-

entrainment and thus facilitate peak performance.

References

Atkinson, G., Drust, B., Reilly, T., & Waterhouse, J. (2003). The

relevance of melatonin to sports medicine and science. Sports

Medicine , 33 , 809

Á831.


Beaumont, M., Bate´jat, D., Pie´rard, C., Van Beers, P., Denis,

J. B., Coste, O., et al. (2004). Caffeine or melatonin effects on

sleep and sleepiness after rapid eastward transmeridian travel.

Journal of Applied Physiology, 96 , 50

Á58.

Blatter, K., Graw, P., Mu



¨ nch, M., Knoblauch, V., Wirz-Justice,

A., & Cajochen, C. (2006). Gender and age differences in

psychomotor vigilance under differential sleep pressure condi-

tions. Behavioural Brain Research , 168 , 312

Á317.

Cajochen, C., Kra¨uchi, K., & Wirz-Justice, A. (2003). Role of



melatonin in the regulation of human circadian rhythms and

sleep. Journal of Neuroendocrinology, 15 , 432

Á437.

Daurat, A., Benoit, O., & Buguet, A. (2000). Effects of zopiclone



on the rest/activity rhythm after a westward flight across five

time zones. Psychopharmacolgy (Berlin) , 149 , 241

Á245.

Drust, B., Waterhouse, J., Atkinson, G., Edwards, B., & Reilly, T.



(2005). Circadian rhythms in sports performance: An update.

Chronobiology International , 22 , 21

Á44.

Edwards, B., Waterhouse, J., Atkinson, G., & Reilly, T. (2002).



Exercise does not necessarily influence the phase of the

circadian rhythm in temperature in healthy humans. Journal

of Sports Sciences , 20 , 725

Á732.


House of Lords Select Committee on Science and Technology

(2000). Air travel and health . London: The Stationery Office.

Kra¨uchi, K., Cajochen, C., Werth, E., & Wirz-Justice, A. (2002).

Alteration of internal circadian phase relationships after timed

CHO-rich meals in humans. Journal of Biological Rhythms , 17 ,

364


Á376.

6

T. Reilly et al.




Kra¨uchi, K., Cajochen, C., & Wirz-Justice, A. (2005). Thermo-

physiologic aspects of the three-process-model of sleepiness

regulation. Clinics in Sports Medicine , 24 , 287

Á300.


Lemmer, B., Kern, R.I., Nold, G., & Lohrer, H. (2002). Jet lag in

athletes after eastward and westward time-zone transition.

Chronobiology International , 19 , 743

Á764.


Minors, D., & Waterhouse, J. (1981). Anchor sleep as a

synchronizer of rhythms in abnormal routines. International

Journal of Chronobiology, 7 , 165

Á188.


Reilly, T., Atkinson, G., & Budgett, R. (2001). Effect of low-dose

temazepam on physiological variables and performance follow-

ing a westerly flight across five time zones. International Journal

of Sports Medicine , 22 , 166

Á174.

Reilly, T., Atkinson, G., & Waterhouse, J. (1997). Biological



rhythms and exercise . Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Reilly, T., & Maskell, P. (1989). Effects of altering the sleep

Áwake

cycle in human circadian rhythms and motor performance.



In Proceedings of the First IOC World Congress on Sport Science

(p. 106). Colorado Springs, CO: US Olympic Committee.

Reilly, T., Maughan, R., & Budgett, R. (1998). Melatonin: A

Position Statement of the British Olympic Association. British

Journal of Sports Medicine , 32 , 99

Á100.


Reilly, T., & Waterhouse, J. (2005). Sport, exercise and environ-

mental physiology. Edinburgh: Elsevier.

Reilly, T., Waterhouse, J., & Edwards, B. (2005). Jet lag and air

travel: Implications for performance. Clinics in Sports Medicine ,

24 , 367

Á380.


Waterhouse, J., Edwards, B., Nevill, A., Carvalho, S., Atkinson,

G., Buckley, P., et al. (2002a). Identifying some determinants

of ‘jet lag’ and its symptoms: A study of athletes and other

travellers. British Journal of Sports Medicine , 36 , 54

Á60.

Waterhouse, J., Minors, D., Waterhouse, M., Reilly, T., &



Atkinson, G. (2002b). Keeping in time with your body clock .

Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Waterhouse, J., Reilly, T., & Atkisnon, G. (1997). Jet-lag. Lancet ,

350 , 1611

Á1615.

Waterhouse, J., Reilly, T., & Edwards, B. (2004). The stress of



travel. Journal of Sports Sciences , 22 , 946

Á966.


Coping with jet-lag: A Position Statement

7



Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə