Timing Jitter Tutorial & Measurement Guide



Yüklə 2,7 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix07.11.2018
ölçüsü2,7 Mb.
#78576


1

Timing Jitter

Tutorial & Measurement Guide

Silicon Labs Timing




2

Table of Contents

Types of Jitter



Random Jitter

Deterministic Jitter



Correlated and Uncorrelated Jitter

Types of Jitter Measurements



Overview of Jitter Measurements

Cycle-to-Cycle Jitter



Period Jitter

TIE Jitter or Phase Jitter



Jitter Measurement Units

Time vs. Frequency Domain



Jitter vs. Phase Noise

Time Domain Equipment



Frequency Domain Equipment

Converting Between Time and Frequency Domain (RMS to 



peak-to-peak)

Time vs. Frequency Domain Examples



Calculating Spur Jitter Contribution

Silicon Labs Timing Solutions



Additional Resources

Glossary



3

Introduction

The demand for near instant data access is increasing exponentially. High data rate 

applications like video, in conjunction with growing numbers of devices connected to 

each other, the Cloud and the Internet, are driving usage ever higher. Likewise, users 

expect to upload and download high-density data in real-time, abandoning web sites 

almost immediately if the speed is slow.

These trends are increasing the need for higher speed, higher bandwidth networks with 

higher data rates, and faster data interfaces. As speeds increase, the clocks and timing 

components that support them must provide better timing sources. 

Jitter is the measure of timing performance. High jitter means poor timing performance in 

most cases. 

This primer provides an overview of jitter and offers practical assistance in taking jitter 

measurements.




4

Types of Jitter



Jitter falls into two broad categories: random jitter and deterministic jitter*.

Random Jitter

Random jitter is a broadband 

stochastic**

Gaussian process that is sometimes referred 

to as 

“intrinsic noise” 



because it is present in every system. In the various phase noise 

plots shown later in this document the relatively smooth sections along the bottom 

represent the intrinsic noise floor and are indicative of random jitter. 

*Links to additional, more detailed information is available in the documents referenced 

in the Additional Resources page.

**Words in blue are defined in the glossary.

Deterministic 

jitter


Data 

Dependent 

jitter

Periodic 



jitter

Random jitter 

(Gaussian)

Jitter



5

Types of Jitter

Random jitter’s instantaneous noise value is mathematically unbounded. Looking 

at the 


random jitter Gaussian curve below, the two tails extending away from the center 

approach zero, but never fully reach it. 

Although the probability of some values is very small, it is not zero, and therefore 

unbounded.

Random jitter can be a significant contributor to overall system jitter. However, it is 

unbounded and intrinsic to each system and is hard to diagnose and remedy. 

Gaussian Distribution of Random Jitter

Center Frequency




6

Types of Jitter



Deterministic Jitter

Deterministic jitter is not random or intrinsic to every system. It has a specific cause and 

is often periodic and narrowband. This means it is repetitious at one or more 

frequencies. Therefore, deterministic jitter is typically identifiable and can be remedied. 

Deterministic jitter can be further subclassified into periodic jitter and data-dependent 

jitter. Jitter from a switching power supply is periodic and deterministic because it has 

the same, periodic frequency as the switching power supply. 

In contrast, intersymbol interference (ISI) is an example of data-dependent jitter from an 

isochronous 8B/10B coded serial data stream (e.g., Ethernet or PCI Express). These 

protocols use dynamically changing duty cycles and irregular clock edges, which 

contribute to overall jitter. 

Data-dependent jitter measurement varies by system, functionality, and other factors, 

and are not specifically addressed in this document. 

Jitter

Data-


dependent 

jitter


Periodic 

jitter


Random jitter 

(Gaussian)

Jitter

Deterministic 



jitter


7

Types of Jitter



Correlated and Uncorrelated Jitter

Correlated jitter on a clock is deterministic and always caused by and correlated to a 

noise source. An example of correlated jitter is periodic jitter, as in the case of a system 

power supply. However, correlated jitter can be 

aperiodic

. An example of correlated 

aperiodic jitter is interference on a clock from a serial line. The interference is correlated 

to the serial data line, but the serial data may be either periodic or aperiodic. 

Uncorrelated jitter is not statistically connected to an identifiable noise source. Random 

jitter is always uncorrelated; however, some correlated jitter may appear to be 

uncorrelated or random. This may occur when several noise sources overlap one 

another, causing their correlated jitter to appear uncorrelated. These noise sources are 

often difficult to identify. 

Correlated Jitter

Statistically identifiable as coming from a specific noise source



Typically periodic but can also be aperiodic, making it difficult to diagnose

More than one noise source may cause correlated jitter seem uncorrelated



Uncorrelated Jitter

Intrinsic noise present in every system



Also known as random jitter

Statistically unrelated to an identifiable noise source



Can be a significant contributor to overall system jitter




8

Types of Jitter Measurements



Overview 



Types of Jitter Measurements

At a high level, there are three primary measurements for clock jitter. Each type of 

measurement applies to various applications with different timing performance 

requirements. 

Applications with the most stringent requirements almost always specify maximum Time 

Interval Error (TIE) jitter and phase noise, and may include requirements for period jitter 

and cycle-to-cycle jitter as well. 

TIE jitter and phase noise measurements require an ideal clock to compare against. 

These two measurements indicate the minimum, typical and maximum difference 

between an ideal clock and the measured clock. 

Period jitter and cycle-to-cycle jitter are useful for digital designers concerned with timing 

for set-up and hold times within digital systems. 

Period jitter measures the clock across a large number of its own cycles and provides 

the minimum, typical and maximum difference compared to the statistical mean of those 

measurements. 

Cycle-to-cycle jitter measures the delta from one clock period to its adjacent clock 

period. Again, this is useful for digital designers who are concerned with set-up and hold 

times in digital design. 

Ideal clock used for TIE jitter and phase 

noise


Measured clock for period jitter

(typically measured over 1K-10K cycles)

Measured clock for cycle-to-cycle jitter

cycle


one

cycle


two


9

Types of Jitter Measurements



Cycle-to-Cycle Jitter

Peak cycle-to-cycle jitter is the maximum difference between consecutive, adjacent 

clock periods measured over a fixed number of cycles, typically 1,000 cycles or 10,000 

cycles. Cycle-to-cycle jitter is used whenever there is a need to limit the size of a sudden 

jump in frequency. 

The term peak-to-peak is defined as the difference between the smallest and the largest 

period sampled during measurement. 

Period Jitter

Peak-to-peak period jitter is the difference between the largest clock period and the 

smallest clock period for all individual clock periods within an observation window, 

typically 1,000 or 10,000 cycles. It is a useful specification for guaranteeing the setup 

and hold time of flip flops in digital systems such as 

FPGAs


Cycle-to-Cycle Jitter (Jcc)

Period Jitter (J

per


)


10

Types of Jitter Measurements



Time Interval Error (TIE) Jitter or Phase Jitter

TIE jitter, also known as accumulated jitter or phase jitter, is the actual deviation from the 

ideal clock period over all clock periods. 

It includes jitter at all jitter modulation frequencies and is commonly used in wide area 

network timing applications, such as SONET, Synchronous Ethernet (SyncE) and optical 

transport networking (OTN). 

More information on TIE and other jitter types can be found in the Additional Resources 

section. 

TIE Jitter (J

TIE


)


11

Types of Jitter Measurements



Jitter Measurement Units

Different measurements or statistics can be taken for all types of jitter, although some 

are more common than others. 

Each type of jitter is measured and specified in time increments of the clock error, 

usually pico-seconds or femto-seconds. A larger number generally indicates a lower 

performance timing source.

Jitter can also be specified in root mean square (RMS) of the timing increment. 

Calculating RMS values often assumes a Gaussian distribution and shows the standard 

deviation (1σ) of the jitter measurement. 

RMS Calculation

To calculate the RMS value for “X” where X

RMS

represents a discrete set of 



values (X

1

… 



X

n

), use the formula below:



??????

??????????????????

=

1

??????



??????

1

2



+ ??????

2

2



+ ⋯ + ????????????

2



12

Time vs. Frequency Domain



Jitter vs. Phase Noise

Jitter is usually a time domain term, while phase noise is a frequency domain term. 

Although it is common for the terms to be used loosely with the result that they are often 

used interchangeably. 

In theory and with perfect measuring equipment, phase noise measured to an infinite 

carrier offset would provide the same value as jitter. However, using practical test 

equipment there will always be a discrepancy between the two. 

Furthermore, tools for each measurement provide different views of the same 

phenomena, which are useful for seeing different types of jitter and frequency 

anomalies. 



Jitter is a time domain term

Typically measured with an oscilloscope



Directly measures peak-to-peak and cycle-to-cycle jitter

Time domain equipment generally has a higher noise floor than frequency 



domain equipment

Phase noise is a frequency domain term

Typically measured with a spectrum analyzer in phase noise mode or a phase 



noise analyzer

Cannot directly measure peak-to-peak or cycle-to-cycle jitter



Random jitter vs. deterministic jitter (spurs) are easily recognized

Spectrum analyzers and phase noise analyzers generally have lower noise 



floors than time domain equipment

Can be integrated over different frequency bands to provide RMS phase jitter




13

Time Domain Equipment

Time domain equipment is typically a high-speed digitizing oscilloscope. 

Only time domain equipment can measure all of the jitter frequency components. It has 

the virtue of being able to directly measure peak-to-peak, cycle-to-cycle, period and TIE 

jitter. This measurement approach permits the measurement of jitter of very low 

frequency clock (or carrier) signals. 

By post-processing the data with various techniques such as FFTs and digital filters, it is 

possible to integrate the phase noise value over a specific band of frequencies to 

generate RMS phase jitter values. 

Time domain equipment is very good at measuring data-dependent jitter, which makes it 

very useful for high-speed serial links that use serializer/deserializer (SERDES) 

technology. 

Time vs. Frequency Domain 

Equipment

Time Domain Equipment Example:

Keysight (Agilent) 90804

Digital Oscilloscope

http://bit.ly/1ENn1hu




14

Time vs. Frequency Domain 

Equipment

Frequency Domain Equipment

Frequency domain equipment is usually a spectrum analyzer, a phase noise analyzer or 

a spectrum analyzer with phase noise measurement capability.

Frequency domain equipment cannot directly measure peak-to-peak, cycle-to-cycle or 

period jitter because its native capability is to measure the RMS power of signals in a 

given frequency band. Frequency domain equipment is also awkward for measuring 

data-dependent jitter. 

However, the best frequency domain instruments have a lower noise floor than the best 

time domain instruments. Spectrum analyzers are also better for recognizing spurs and 

random jitter.

This fact makes frequency domain instruments the first choice for ultra-low phase noise 

clock signal measurements. 

Frequency Domain Equipment Example:

Keysight (Agilent) E5052B 

Spectrum Analyzer

http://bit.ly/1ESzakM




15

Converting Between Time and

Frequency Domain

Converting RMS Jitter 

(1σ

) to Peak-to-Peak

It is often desirable to convert an RMS jitter value to a peak-to-peak number and vice 

versa. One common approach is to make an approximation using a 

crest factor 

and 

assuming a Gaussian noise model. 



A crest factor is calculated for peak-to-peak jitter given an RMS jitter value and a 

tolerable bit error rate (BER). Once calculated, the resulting crest factor is used to 

convert between the RMS jitter value and peak-to-peak value. 

Conversion Example

Convert RMS jitter (1

σ

) to / from peak-to-peak jitter



Most approaches use “crest factors” and are approximations

Peak-to-peak estimate must be based on a specific BER

Industry typically uses BER = 10



-12

for clocks

Example conversion

For BER = 10



-12

, RMS to peak-to-peak crest factor = 14.069

So, 1 ps RMS jitter ~= 14.069 ps, peak-to-peak jitter



TRY Silicon Labs

Phase Noise to Jitter Calculator

Jitter crest factor (RMS to / from peak-peak )

BER


Crest factor (α)

+/- StdDev (σ)

1E-11

13.412


6.706

1E-12

14.069

7.034

1E-13


14.698

7.349


Generally accepted 

industry clock BER




16

Time vs. Frequency Domain 

Equipment Summary

Time Domain Equipment

Frequency Domain 

Equipment

Native 

Measurements

Peak-to-Peak Jitter



Cycle-to-Cycle Jitter

Period Jitter



RMS Phase Jitter

Phase Noise



Jitter Frequency 

Information

Advantages

Good with Low-



Frequency Clocks

Good with Data-



Dependent Jitter

Lower Noise Floor



Easy Detection of Spurs vs. 

Random Jitter



17

Time vs. Frequency Domain 

Examples

Time Domain Equipment vs. Frequency Domain Equipment

In the following pages, we show time and frequency domain measurements on an 

oscilloscope and a spectrum analyzer. Both tools show a single sine wave with no 

modulation, and then with added modulation. 

In each plot, jitter is visible and modulation is quite obvious. 

2.488 GHz frequency is a common SONET frequency. 

Time domain plot of 

2.488 GHz frequency.

Frequency domain plot of 

2.488 GHz frequency.




18

Time vs. Frequency Domain 

Examples

Frequency Domain: Spectrum Analyzer

The spectrum 

analyzer 

immediately 

shows the 

frequency 

modulation is at  

15 MHz.


Two symmetric and 

equal amplitude 

sidebands indicate 

frequency 

modulation

Single frequency. 

Spur

2.488 GHz Sine Wave 





Freq Modulation 



ON 

2.488 GHz Sine Wave 



Freq Modulation 



OFF 



19

Time vs. Frequency Domain 

Examples

Time Domain: High-Speed Digitizing Oscilloscope

2.488 GHz Sine Wave 



Freq Modulation 



ON 

2.488 GHz Sine Wave 



Freq Modulation 



OFF 

No obvious 

spurs

Modulated signal shows the sine 



wave spends much of its time at 

the extreme ends of the clock 

period.

Signal period shows 



concentration at a single 

frequency.




20

Time vs. Frequency Domain 

Examples

Frequency Domain: Phase Noise Analyzer, Spectrum Plot

Many applications use phase noise when specifying required maximum clock jitter. 

Phase noise can be shown in both a frequency spectrum sweep or a phase noise plot, 

both in frequency domain. 

In the frequency spectrum sweep shown below, the plot is mostly symmetric around the 

Ethernet carrier at 312.5 MHz, with spurs located at both plus and minus offsets. 

The marker “1” shows the largest 

periodic spur at +1.13 MHz positive offset. It also has 

a mirror spur, roughly the same size and located at the -1.13 MHz negative offset. 

Mirrored spurs are characteristic of a carrier frequency and accordingly, other spur pairs 

can be seen. 

312.5 MHz Clock Frequency Spectrum Sweep

Spur at +1.13 

MHz offset

312.5 MHz Carrier 

Frequency




21

312.5 MHz Clock Phase Noise Plot

Time vs. Frequency Domain 

Examples


Frequency Domain: Phase Noise Analyzer, Phase Noise Plot

A phase noise plot of the same 312.5 MHz carrier is shown below in a phase noise plot. 

The carrier does not show up on the plot and is conceptually located to the left of the 

plot, just off of the y-axis. 

The phase noise plot shows a “

single-


sideband,” or only 

one half of the spectrum. The 

other half is assumed to be symmetric, as shown in the spectrum sweep on the prior 

page. The largest spur is again located at +1.13 MHz offset. 

Phase noise analyzers calculate RMS noise to include the contribution from the missing 

half of the spectrum. 

Another noteworthy difference between spectrum plots and phase noise plots is that the 

horizontal scale of phase noise plots is logarithmic while spectrum plots use a linear 

scale.

Spur at +1.13 



MHz offset


22

Calculating Spur Jitter 

Contribution

Investigating Spurs

The 


word “spur” 

refers to spurious noise. Spurs are periodic and typically stationary. 

They are also correlated to a noise source. 

Spurs are usually modeled as sine wave modulations of the carrier, and they are 

considered to be jitter at a single offset frequency.

490 MHz Clock Phase Noise Plot

Clock Frequency (490 

MHz)


RMS Jitter (339.3 fs)

Spur “A” (

-79 dBc)

Spur “B” (

-87 dBc)

Integration Band

(12KHz-20MHz)



23

Calculating Spur Jitter 

Contribution

Characterizing and Calculating Spurs

spur’s jitter contribution is well understood, and typically only large spurs contribute 



significantly to a system’s overall RMS jitter. 

490 MHz phase noise plot with random Gaussian noise and spurious jitter



Integration band: 12 kHz to 20 MHz

Calculated RMS jitter = 339.2 fsec (includes random noise jitter and 



spurs’ jitter)

490 MHz Clock Phase Noise Plot

Clock Frequency (490 

MHz)


RMS Jitter (339.3 fs)

Spur “A” (

-79 dBc)

Spur “B” (

-87 dBc)

Integration Band

(12KHz-20MHz)



24

490 MHz Clock Phase Noise Plot

Clock Frequency (490 

MHz)


RMS Jitter (339.3 fs)

Spur “A” (

-79 dBc)

Spur “B” (

-87 dBc)

Integration Band

(12kHz-20MHz)

Characterizing and Calculating Spurs

The following equations shown determine the jitter associated with a spur as shown on a 

phase noise plot. The required information for this calculation is the carrier frequency 

and the spur amplitude in dBc.

????????????????????????????????????

????????????−????????????−????????????

= ( 

2

??????



∙ 10

??????


20

) ∙ (


1

??????


) -- AND -- ????????????????????????????????????

??????????????????

=  

????????????????????????????????????



????????????−????????????−????????????

2√2


Where, S = spur amplitude in dBc, F = clock (carrier) frequency in Hz

Calculating Spur Jitter 

Contribution

Spur


RMS jitter contribution

Spur A


51.5 fs

Spur B


20.5 fs


25

Calculating Spur Jitter 

Contribution

How Do Spurs Affect Total RMS Jitter?

RMS 


values “add” using the Root Sum 

Square (RSS) equation. In other words, to 

calculate a total RMS of separate RMS values, take the square root of the sum of the 

square of each value. 

Quantifying the jitter contribution of spur A & B, we use the RSS 

equation to “back out” 

each spur’s RMS 

jitter from total RMS jitter, arriving at the RMS jitter without the spurs. 

J

total(RMS)



= 339.3 fs (from screen capture)

J



spurA RMS

= 51.5 fs (from calculation)

J

spurB(RMS)



= 20.5 fs (from calculation)

339.3fs =



J

noAB(RMS)

2

+ J


spurA (RMS)

2

+ J



spurB (RMS)

2



339.3fs =

J

noAB(RMS)



2

+ 51.5fs


2

+ 20.5fs


2

J



noAB(RMS)

=

J



total(RMS)

2

− J



spurA RMS

2

− J



spurB (RMS)

2



J

noAB(RMS)

= 339.3fs

2

− 51.5fs



2

− 20.5fs


2

J



noAB(RMS)

= 334.7 fs



Summary

Total RMS jitter (including spurs) = 339.3 fs



Removing spur A & B contribution leaves RMS jitter = 334.7 fs

Result: spurs A & B are small contributor to total RMS jitter. 




26

Summary


Jitter falls into two categories: random and deterministic. Random jitter is unbounded 

and hard to diagnose. 

Deterministic jitter is often periodic and narrowband. It is also often correlated to a 

particular noise generator. More than one noise generator can create jitter that may 

appear uncorrelated on clock output signals. 

Different applications rely on different measures of jitter. The most comprehensive 

measurement is TIE or phase jitter, and requires an ideal clock to compare the tested 

clock against. Period jitter and cycle-to-cycle jitter compare the clock to itself to identify 

variations within the clock cycles. 

Jitter is measured in the time or frequency domain by different types of equipment. Time 

domain equipment generally has a higher noise floor than frequency domain equipment. 

Time domain equipment effectively presents period and cycle-to-cycle measurements. 

Frequency domain equipment effectively shows deterministic jitter (spurs) and random 

jitter.  

Spurs contribute to overall jitter, and can be measured and accumulated via equations 

provided.  

Silicon Labs timing technology and expertise reduce jitter and speed time to market. 



27

This tutorial focuses on various types of jitter and how to measure them. 

Silicon Labs provides expertise, tools and solutions for how to quantify, identify and 

eliminate jitter from systems. 

Our timing solutions are all customizable for any frequency and any output and 

deliverable in less than two weeks.

Go to Oscillators

Ultra-low jitter any-frequency, any-format oscillators.

Go to Buffers

Ultra-low jitter universal clock buffers and level-

translators for any format and any voltage.

Silicon Labs Timing Solutions

Try the Silicon Labs

Phase Noise to Jitter Calculator

Go to Clocks

Ultra-low jitter any-frequency, any-output, single-chip 

clocks, jitter attenuators, and network synchronizers. 



28

Thank You




29

Additional Resources

AN279 – Estimating Period Jitter from Phase Noise



– This application note 

reviews how RMS period jitter may be estimated from phase noise data. This 

approach is useful for estimating period jitter when sufficiently accurate 

time domain instruments, such as jitter measuring oscilloscopes or Time 

Interval Analyzers (TIAs), are unavailable.

AN491 – Power Supply Rejection for Low-Jitter Clocks



– Hardware designers 

are routinely challenged to increase functional density while shrinking the 

overall PCB footprint. One significant challenge is minimizing clock jitter. 

Since noise and interference are everywhere and since multiple components 

share a common power supply, the power supply is a direct path for noise 

and interference to impact the jitter performance of each device. Therefore, 

achieving the lowest clocking jitter requires careful management of the 

power supply.

AN687 – A Primer on Jitter, Jitter Measurement, and Phase-Locked Loops



This primer provides an overview of jitter, offers practical assistance in 

making jitter measurements and examines the role phase-locked loops have 

in this field.




30

Glossary


• Stochastic process -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stochastic_process

- In 

probability theory, a stochastic (/stoʊˈkæstɪk/) process, or often random 



process, is a collection of random variables, representing the evolution of 

some system of random values over time. This is the probabilistic 

counterpart to a deterministic process (or deterministic system). Instead of 

describing a process that can only evolve in one way (as in the case, for 

example, of solutions of an ordinary differential equation), in a stochastic or 

random process there is some indeterminacy; even if the initial condition (or 

starting point) is known, there are several (often infinitely many) directions 

in which the process may evolve.

• Aperiodic -

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/aperiodic

- of 

irregular occurrence;  not periodic.



• FPGA -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field-programmable_gate_array

- A 

field-programmable gate array (FPGA) is an integrated circuit designed to be 



configured by a customer after manufacturing – hence "field-

programmable."

• Crest factor -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crest_factor

- Crest factor is the 

ratio of peak value to the rms value of a current waveform.




31

James Wilson, Marketing Director, Timing Products

James Wilson is 

the director of marketing for Silicon Labs’ 

timing products, managing product strategy, roadmap 

development, new product initiatives, product 

management, software development and marketing 

promotions. As part of his role, Mr. Wilson has been a key 

contributor in architecting Silicon Labs’ online strategy to 

offer mass-customized clocks and oscillators using simple 

web-based tools. Prior to joining Silicon Labs in 2002, Mr. 

Wilson held a variety of marketing, product management 

and engineering roles at Freescale and various start-ups.  

Mr. Wilson holds a Bachelor of Science degree in 

mechanical engineering and a master’s degree in 

business administration from the University of Texas at 

Austin. 


Author


Yüklə 2,7 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə