Treatment of Acne Scars Using Fractional Erbium: yag laser



Yüklə 111,24 Kb.

tarix27.02.2018
ölçüsü111,24 Kb.


American Journal of Dermatology and Venereology 2014, 3(2): 43-49 

DOI: 10.5923/j.ajdv.20140302.04 

 

Treatment of Acne Scars Using Fractional Erbium:  

YAG Laser 

Shakir J. Al-Saedy

1,*

, Maytham M. Al-Hilo

1

, Salah H. Al-Shami

2

 

1

MBChB, FICMS, DV, Consultant Dermatologist and Venereologist, Al-Kindy Teaching Hospital, Baghdad, Iraq 



2

MBChB., Al-Kindy Teaching Hospital, Baghdad, Iraq 

 

Abstract

  Background: Acne is a common disorder experienced by people between 11 and 30 years of age and to lesser 

extent by older adults. Fractional resurfacing employs a unique mechanism of action that repairs a fraction of skin at a time. 

The untreated healthy skin remains intact and actually aids the repair process, promoting rapid healing with only a day or two 

of downtime.  Objective: This study is designed  to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of fractional photothermolysis 

(fractionated Erbium: YAG laser) in treating moderate – severe atrophic acne scars. Methods: Thirty one females and 9 males 

with moderate to severe atrophic acne scarring were enrolled in this study that attained Beirut Private Center for Laser 

Treatments in Baghdad, Iraq during the period from March, 1

st

 2011 to September, 1



st

 2011. Fractional Erbium:YAG laser 

2940 nm wavelength was delivered to the whole face with a single pass treatment and for the acne scar areas with two passes. 

Therapeutic outcomes were assessed by standardized digital photography

.

 Results: Ten patients (25%) reported excellent 



improvement,  twenty one patients (50%) significant improvement, six  patients (15%) moderate improvement, and four 

patients (10%) mild improvement in the appearance of the acne scars. Conclusion: Erbium:YAG laser is an effective device 

for skin resurfacing with faster recovery time and fewer side effects in comparison to other treatment modalities.

 

Keywords

    Acne, Atrophic acne scar, Fractional Er: YAG laser 

 

1. Introduction 

Acne is a common disorder experienced by up to 80% of 

people between 11 and 30 years of age and by up to 5% of 

older adults  [1].  Several factors are incriminated in the 

pathogenesis of acne including increased sebum production, 

follicular  abmormal keratinization, colonization with 

Propionibacterium acnes, and a lymphocytic and 

neutrophilic inflammatory response  [2]. The severe 

inflammatory response to P acnes may results in permanent 

disfiguring scars. Stigmata of severe acne scarring can lead 

to social ostracism, withdrawal from society, and severe 

psychological depression [3]. Patients dislike the appearance 

of acne, and prevention of acne scarring is often a key 

motivation behind treatment. 

Once scarring has occurred, patients and physicians are 

left to struggle with the options available for improving the 

appearance of the skin [4].

 

Acne scarring can be divided into 3 basic types: icepick 



scars, rolling scars, and boxcar scars [5]. Boxcar scars can be 

further subdivided into shallow or deep [6]. 

Other less common scars such as sinus tracts, hypertrophic   

 

* Corresponding author: 



firas_rashad@yahoo.com (Shakir J. Al-Saedy) 

Published online at http://journal.sapub.org/ajdv 

Copyright © 2014 Scientific & Academic Publishing. All Rights Reserved 

scars, and keloidal scars may occur after acne treatment [7]. 

Their  treatment options  include excision, cryosurgery, 

pulsed dye laser treatment,  compression with silicone 

sheeting, and various other modalities [8].   

Goodman  proposed a qualitative global acne scarring 

grading system (table 1) (Greg. J. Goodman and Jennifer A. 

Baron) [9]. 

The concept of fractional photothermolysis revolutionized 

cutaneous laser resurfacing when introduced by Manstein et 

al in 2004. Using a nonablative, 1550-nm Er-doped fiber 

laser, full-thickness columns of thermal injury (termed 

microthermal  treatment zones or MTZs) are created in a 

pixelated pattern just below the level of the stratum corneum, 

with the surrounding skin left intact. 

Fractional resurfacing employs a unique mechanism of 

action that repairs a fraction of skin at a time. The laser is 

used to resurface the epidermis and, at the same time, to heat 

the dermis to promote safely the formation of new collagen. 

The untreated healthy skin remains intact and actually aids 

the repair process, promoting rapid healing with only a day 

or two of downtime  [10]. The primary target is both the 

epidermis and dermis with the aim of creating small zones of 

micro-damage separated by zones of non irradiated tissue 

that assist with the rapid healing process.  The aim of the 

fractional approach is to obtain the best possible results with 

the least possible damage, and the degree of thermal damage 

delivered to the target skin depends on the dosage, the pulse 




44 

Shakir J. Al-Saedy et al.:    Treatment of Acne Scars Using Fractional Erbium: YAG Laser 

 

 

 



width of the beam, and the number of passes over the same 

target area [11].

 

Er:YAG laser is a flashlamp-excited system that emits 



light at an invisible infrared wavelength of 2940 nm. Its light 

is about 16  times better absorbed by tissue water than the 

10,600 nm wavelength emitted by the CO2 laser. The 

Er:YAG laser produces a pulse of 250-350  microseconds 

that is less than the thermal relaxation time of the skin, which 

is 1 msec. Also, the Er:YAG laser causes tissue ablation with 

very little tissue vaporization and desiccation. The ablation 

threshold of the Er:YAG laser for human skin has been 

calculated at 1.6 J/cm

2

 as compared with 5 J/cm



2

 calculated 

for high-energy, short-pulse CO2 laser systems. Because the 

Er:YAG laser is so exquisitely absorbed

 

by water, it causes 



l0-40 μm of tissue ablation and as little as 5 μm of thermal 

damage. In contrast, the high-energy, short-pulse CO2 lasers 

cause l00-120 μm of tissue damage, which is composed of 

50-60  μm  of  apparent  tissue  desiccation (ablation or 

coagulation) and an additional 50-75 μm of thermal damage. 

The precise tissue ablation and small zone  of residual 

thermal damage results in faster reepithelialization and an 

improved side effect profile. Apart from water being the 

major chromophore of skin ablative lasers, the Er:YAG laser 

wavelength is also absorbed by the collagen, further 

supporting the ablation process within the deeper dermal 

layers [12]. 

In 1997 the FDA approved Er:YAG laser for resurfacing 

[13] and since then it gained more and more interest for the 

purpose of resurfacing procedures, such as in acne scars or in 

the rejuvenation of photoaged skin areas. In addition, many 

other skin disorders formerly treated by dermabrasion or that 

were indication for thermal laser coagulation or vaporization 

can be removed by Er:YAG skin ablation (Table 2). They 

comprise many superficial lesions derived from epidermal or 

adnexal structures, but also various circumscribed 

malformations and benign tumors located deeper within the 

dermis. In addition, certain pigmented and melanocytic 

lesions, as well as a variety of miscellaneous pathological 

conditions can be removed [14-18]. 

This study, was designed to evaluate the safety and 

effectiveness of fractional photothermolysis  (fractionated 

Erbium:YAG laser) in treating moderate – severe atrophic 

acne scars. 

2. Patients & Methods 

This is an open therapeutic trial study performed at Beirut 

Private Center for Laser Treatments in Baghdad, Iraq during 

the period from March, 1

st

 2011 to September, 1



st

 2011. Forty 

patients (31 females and 9 males) with moderate to severe 

atrophic acne scarring according to Goodman’s qualitative 

global scarring grading system were included in this study. 

Their age ranges from 17-48 years with a mean ±  SD  of 

28.075  ± 6.87  years. Their skin types were III –  IV 

(Fitzpatrick skin types). This study approved by the ethical 

committee in Al-Kindy teaching hospital. Written informed 

consent was obtained from each patient.   

Exclusion criteria include  known photosensitivity, 

pregnancy or lactation, inflammatory skin disorders or active 

herpes infection. Patients with hypertrophic or keloidal 

scarring or history of hypertrophic or keloid were driven out 

of the study. The use of anti-coagulants, isotretinoin or other 

physical acne treatments over the past 6 months, patients 

who had any medical illness  (e.g. diabetes, chronic 

infections, blood dyscrasias) that could influence the wound 

healing process were also excluded. Patients were allowed to 

continue previous acne medications during the study except 

isotretinoin. 

The whole procedure was fully explained and thoroughly 

discussed with the patients about the mechanism of laser 

treatment, the time required for the treatment, the behavior 

after the laser treatment, and the prospects of successful 

treatment and any unrealistic expectations of the end results 

were strongly discouraged. The patients were informed 

about all risks that may be caused by the laser treatment and 

the pre- and post-operative care. 

Prior to each treatment, the face was cleansed with a mild 

non-abrasive detergent and gauzes soaked in 70% isopropyl 

alcohol.   

A topical anesthetic cream (EMLA, a eutectic mixture of 

local anesthesia of 2.5% lidocaine and 2.5% prilocaine, 

AstraZenica LP, Wilmington DE) was applied under an 

occlusive dressing for 1 hour and subsequently washed off to 

obtain completely dry skin surface. Eyes were protected with 

opaque goggles. Systemic antiviral  therapy (acyclovir 400 

mg twice daily) prescribed for each patient the night before 

operation as prophylaxis and for five days post operatively as 

well as topical antibiotics and a moisturizing cream, the 

patients were informed to apply a sunscreen for six weeks. 

Three photos were taken before treatment for each patient 

for both sides and the front of the face with a digital camera 

(Sony DSC

-

T99



 

Cyber-shot® Digital

 

Camera, 14.1 



megapixel HD) and another set of photos was taken in each 

visit post-treatment using identical camera settings, lighting, 

and patient positioning. 

Fractional Erbium:YAG laser (MCL30 Dermablate, 

Asclepion Laser Technologies, Germany) 2940 nm 

wavelength was delivered to the whole face with a single 

pass treatment and with two passes for the acne scar areas 

with total fluence of 108 J/cm

2

, interval of 0.5 second, and 



the window of the laser hand piece was 9 x 9 mm supporting 

169 microbeams with pulse energy on the treated site of 1.5 J. 

The same parameters applied for all patients. Smoke 

evacuator and a forced air cooling system (Zimmer 

MedizinSystemme, Cryo version 6) accompanied the 

procedure to improve patients comfort and compliance. 

Patients were asked to return for medical assessment 1 week 

after operation then followed up monthly for 3 months. 

Therapeutic outcomes were assessed by standardized 

digital photography by the patient himself and by two 

blinded dermatologists. The dermatologists' evaluation and 

self-assessment  level of improvement  of  the patients were 

evaluated using the following five-point scale:   

0 = no change;   




 

American Journal of Dermatology and Venereology 2014, 3(2): 43-49 

45 

 

 



1 = slight improvement (0–25%);   

2 = moderate improvement (26–50%);   

3 = significant improvement (51–75%);   

4 = excellent improvement (>75%). 

The two assessors were blinded to the order of the 

photographs. The evaluators were asked to perform two 

actions. First, to identify the photograph that showed better 

scar appearance. Second, to rate the difference in the severity 

of the acne scars using the above mentioned scale. 

In addition, the participants were asked to report any 

cutaneous or systemic side effects associated with laser 

treatment. In  particular, a pain scale of 0–3  was used to 

determine the level of discomfort during the procedures as 

following: 

0 = no pain 

1 = mild pain 

2 = moderate pain 

3 = severe pain 

Statistical data were analyzed by Chi test using Software 

Minitab V.16 and P value < 0.05 is considered statistically 

significant descriptive data by frequency, percent, figure and 

table. 


 

Figure 1.    Patient no.1 pre- and 3 months post-operatively 

 

Figure 2.  Patient no.2 pre- and 3 months post-operatively 




46 

Shakir J. Al-Saedy et al.:    Treatment of Acne Scars Using Fractional Erbium: YAG Laser 

 

 

 



 

 

Figure 3.    Patient no.3 pre- and 3 months post-operatively 



Table 1.    Goodman’s qualitative global scarring grading system [9]

 

Grade 



Level of Disease 

Clinical Features 

Examples of Scars 

Macular disease 



Erythematous, hyper- or hypo-pigmented flat marks visible to patient or 

observer irrespective of distance 

Erythematous, hyper- or hypo 

–pigmented flat marks 

Mild disease 



Mild atrophy or hypertrophy that may not be obvious at social distances 

of 50 cm or greater and may be covered adequately by makeup or the 

normal shadow of shaved beard hair in males or normal body hair if 

extrafacial 

Mild rolling, small soft papular 

Moderate disease 



Moderate atrophic or hypertrophic scarring that is obvious at social 

distances of 50 cm or greater and is not covered easily by makeup the 

normal shadow of shaved beard hair in males or body hair if extrafacial, 

but is still able to be flattened by manual stretching of the skin 

More significant rolling, shallow 

‘‘box car ,’’ mild to moderate 

hypertrophic or papular scars 

Severe disease 



Severe atrophic or hypertrophic scarring that is obvious at social 

distances of 50 cm or greater and is not covered easily by makeup or the 

normal shadow of shaved beard hair in males or body hair (if extrafacial) 

and is not able to be flattened by manual stretching of the skin 

Punched out atrophic (deep 

‘‘boxcar’’), ‘‘ice pick’’, bridges and 

tunnels, gross atrophy, dystrophic 

scars, significant hypertrophy or 

keloid 

 

 



 

American Journal of Dermatology and Venereology 2014, 3(2): 43-49 

47 

 

 



Table 2.    Patients predominant scars types 

Patients Number 

Type of scar 

10 (25%) 

significant rolling 

16 (40%) 

shallow boxcar 

8 (20%) 


Deep boxcar 

6 (15%) 


icepick scars 

Table 3.    Response to treatment by Er:YAG laser for the level of improvement assessed by dermatologists 

 

Score 











P value 

Weeks 

1 wk 


 

12 (30%) 

18 (45%) 

8 (20%) 


2 (5%) 

0.002 


4 wk 

 

10 (25%) 



15 (37.5%) 

10 (25%) 

5 (12.5%) 

8 wk 


 

6 (15%) 


8 (20%) 

16 (40%) 

8 (20%) 

12 wk 


 

4 (10%) 


6 (15%) 

20 (50%) 

10 (25%) 

Table 4.    Response to treatment by Er:YAG laser for the level of improvement assessed by the patient 

 

Score 











value 

Weeks 

1 wk 


 

15 (37.5%) 

20 (50%) 

4 (10%) 


1 (2.5%) 

0.001 


4 wk 

 

13 (32.5%) 



17 (42.5%) 

7 (17.5%) 

3 (7.5%) 

8 wk 


 

9 (22.5%) 

11 (27.5%) 

13 (32.5%) 

7 (17.5%) 

12 wk 


 

8 (20%) 


7 (17.5%) 

17 (42.5%) 

8 (20%) 

 

3. Results 

Forty patients (31 females and 9 males) were included in 

the study. All patients completed the study, including the 3- 

month follow-up period.  All  patients had mixed types of 

atrophic acne scars, including ice pick, boxcar, and rolling 

scars, although, some particular type predominates and 

therefore is used to classify the patients accordingly (Table 

2). 


According to dermatologists'  assessment  (Table 3) the 

results were escalating dramatically from 5% in 1

st 

week to 


25% for excellent improvement after 3 months; although, 

this group is not the major group who shows improvement. 

Significant improvement group shows increase from 20% 

after 1 week to 50% after 3 months, it gives us a strong 

indicator of the overall results.   

The improvement scale was so obvious from first week 

(30% mild to 5% significant) through 4

th

 – and 8



th

 -week to 

become more satisfactory (10% mild to 25%) after three 

months of operation. 

The final results after 3 months were as follows: Ten 

patients (25%) reported excellent improvement, twenty one 

patients (50%) significant improvement, six patients (15%) 

moderate improvement, and four patients (10%) mild 

improvement in the appearance of the acne scars. The results 

were significant as indicated by the P value which was 0.002. 

 

The patients self assessment of improvement was also 



remarkable and showed a great amount of satisfaction (Table 

4). The results were almost comparable to the 

dermatologists' assessment and were considered significant 

as indicated by the P value which was 0.001. 

Table (3) shows that the two factors (scores and weeks) 

are not independent, in another words there is a relationship 

between two factors (chi-square value 25.591 df=9 P=0.002). 

Similar conclusion can be reported for Table (4) (chi-square 

value 27.30 df=9 P=0.001) 

The laser treatment was generally well tolerated. All 

participants underwent treatment-related pain, but there was 

no need for extra anesthesia (Table 5). 

All participants reported mild erythema for approximately 

2-3 days, and 80% of patients experienced edema for <24 

hours following laser treatment. Peeling occurs from the 

second day and completed  in the fifth day in 90%  of the 

patients and in 10% last for 7  days. Social activity could 

commence as early as 3 days after the laser treatment. Other 

possible adverse events related to laser treatment in general, 

such as pigmentary alterations (hyperpigmentation), 

bleeding, vesiculation, crust, scarring, and infection were not 

observed. (Table 6) 



Table 5.    Patients pain scale during operation 

Degree of pain 

Number of patients 



11 (27.5%) 

25 (62.5%) 



4 (10%) 


Table 6.    Adverse effects related to treatment by Fractional Er: YAG Laser 

Adverse effects 

No.&% of patients 

treatment-related pain 

(40) 100% 

mild erythema 

(40) 100% 

Edema 


(32)80% 

Severe peeling 

(4)10% 

Bleeding 



Hyperpigmentation 

Vesiculation 



Crust 


Scarring 

Infection 






48 

Shakir J. Al-Saedy et al.:    Treatment of Acne Scars Using Fractional Erbium: YAG Laser 

 

 

 



4. Discussion 

In this open therapeutic trial study, patients received 

fractional Er:YAG laser in a single treatment session. The 

final outcome was evaluated after three months period by 

two blinded dermatologists and by the patient's 

self-assessment using standardized digital photography. The 

results were very satisfactory as more than 60% of patients 

showed moderate to significant improvement. The patients' 

self assessment is slightly lower than that of the 

dermatologists; this might be attributed to the fact that the 

patients usually use more subjective than objective scales, 

and they show a higher level of expectations of end results 

than the actual outcome. The results of both assessment 

groups (the patients and the dermatologists) are significant as 

indicated by the P  values which were 0.001 and 0.002 

respectively. 

According to best of our knowledge in fractional 

photothermolysis, studies that investigate the role of 

Erbium:YAG laser as a sole option in the treatment of 

atrophic acne scars are lacking or very limited. There were 

no controlled trials but few case series which reported the 

effects of either the carbon dioxide or erbium:YAG laser. All 

of the studies were of poor quality. The types and severity of 

scarring were poorly described and there was no standard 

scale used to measure scar improvement. There was no 

reliable or validated measure of patient satisfaction; most 

improvement was based on visual clinical judgment, in many 

cases without blinded assessment  [25]. This might be 

partially attributed to the fact that Er:YAG laser is 

considered as a superficial laser and is usually not substantial 

for the treatment of the relatively deep lesions of acne scars. 

In a series of 78 patients, Weinstein [26] reported 70-90% 

improvement of acne scarring in the majority of  patients 

treated with a modulated Er:YAG laser. He proposed that 

pitted acne scars may require ancillary procedures, such as 

subcision or punch excision, for optimal results. These 

procedures can be performed either prior to or concomitant 

with Er:YAG laser resurfacing. 

The effect of fractional CO2 laser on skin resurfacing is 

fully considered worldwide.  However, there have been 

limited studies comparing the clinical outcome and adverse 

effects of these two lasers (CO2 vs. Er:YAG). In two studies, 

one conducted in Iraq [29] and another one in Thailand [30), 

investigating the efficacy of fractional CO2 laser for the 

treatment of acne scars, 75% of the CO2 laser sites  were 

graded as having moderate to significant improvement of 

scars. Their end-results were not significantly different from 

our results after 3 months follow-up (65% showed moderate 

to significant improvement) but taking in consideration the 

duration of operation which was much shorter for Er:YAG 

laser than the time needed to operate with CO2 laser (less 

than 10 minutes for Er:YAG compared to 45 minutes for 

CO2 laser). The post-operative pain, edema, erythema and 

duration of peeling were less and more tolerable and 

acceptable than that were associated with CO2 laser 

treatment. In contrast to CO2 laser resurfacing, the narrower 

zone of necrosis produced by the Er:YAG laser will allow 

the skin to recover faster [31]. Pigment alteration, which is a 

common side effect of CO2 laser, was not reported with 

Er:YAG laser in any of our patients even with those who 

don't commit to strict sunscreen. 

In procedures aiming at aesthetic improvement, patient 

perception of the treatment outcome appears to be most 

important because it has a direct impact on patients’ body 

image and self-esteem, which can be obtained superbly by 

the CO2 laser but when the Er:YAG laser is used for 

resurfacing in the fractional mode, the results are noteworthy, 

recovery time is considerably shortened and traditional 

post-resurfacing sequelae are absent.  Consequently this 

allows the patients a rapid return to their social or work 

environment [27]. 

Using the parameters mentioned earlier in this study, all 

patients show different level of improvement ranging from 

mild to excellent results after only one session of laser 

treatment even in patients with icepick or deep boxcar scars 

which are usually resistant to other conventional laser 

treatment. Furthermore, many patients mentioned they 

experienced a remarkable improvement in ‘skin quality’ and 

subsequently can wear more natural makeup.   

The final outcome of our treatment is best read after 3-6 

months post-operatively. This time is usually needed for new 

collagen remodeling [28] and it was the same time interval 

we use to follow up our patients and read their end-results 

which were significantly different from the results after one 

week post-operatively. 

Most types of acne scars will benefit to some degree by 

laser resurfacing techniques. In acne scars the precision of 

sculpturing with excellent visual control and minimal heat 

damage can make Er:YAG laser ablation superior to CO2 

laser. Moreover, thermal damage to follicles and sebaceous 

glands can be avoided, so that acne flare ups, as reported 

after CO2 laser is not reported [32]. 

In general, Erbium:YAG laser is an effective device for 

skin resurfacing and has faster recovery time and fewer side 

effects when compared to the CO2 laser resurfacing [33]. 

5. Conclusions 

1. Fractional Erbium:YAG photothermolysis can be a safe 

and effective option for the treatment of acne scars in Iraqi 

patients by offering faster recovery time and fewer side 

effects 

2.  Fractional Erbium:YAG photothermolysis  was 

associated with substantial improvement in the appearance 

of all types of acne scar, which includes the softening of scar 

contours as well as the reduction of scar depth. 

3.  Most patients began to show a visible improvement 

following only one session. According to visual assessments 

of patients and dermatologists, patients' improvement 

continues to occur even after 3 months of operation.   



 

American Journal of Dermatology and Venereology 2014, 3(2): 43-49 

49 

 

 



6. Recommendations 

We need further studies with: 

1. higher fluence and more passes. 

2. more treatment sessions. 

3. further follow up for 6-12 months. 

 

REFERENCES 

[1]  Kraning KK, Odland GF. Prevalence, morbidity, and cost of 

dermatological diseases. J Invest Dermatol 1979;  73(Suppl): 

395-401. 

[2]  Goulden V, Stables GI, Cunliffe WJ. Prevalence of facial 

acne in adults. J Am Acad Dermatol 1999;41:577-80. 

[3]  Leeming JP, Holland KT, Cunliffe WJ. The pathological and 

ecological  significance of micro-organisms colonizing acne 

vulgaris comedones. J Med Microbiol 1985;20:11-6. 

[4]  Norris JFB,  Cunliffe WJ.A histological and immunocyto 

chemical  study of early acne lesions. Br J Dermatol 

1988;118:651-9. 

[5]  Knaggs HE, Holland DB, Morris C, Wood EJ, Cunliffe WJ. 

Quantification of cellular proliferation in acne using the 

monoclonal  antibody Ki-67. J Invest Dermatol 

1994;102:89-92. 

[6]  Koo JY, Smith LL. Psychologic aspects of acne. Pediatr 

Dermatol 1991;8:185-8. 

[7]  Alster TS,West TB. Treatment of scars: a review. Ann Plast 

Surg 1997;39:418-32. 

[8]  Tsau SS, Dover JS, Arndt KA, et al. Scar management: keloid, 

hypertrophic, atrophic, and acne scars. Semin Cutan Med 

Surg 2002;21:46-75. 

[9]  Goodman GJ, Baron JA. Postacne scarring  a quantitative 

global scarring grading system. J Cosmet Dermatol 

2006;5:48-52. 

[10]  Tierney EP, et al: Review of fractional photothermolysis: 

treatment indications an efficacy. Dermatol Surg 2009 Oct; 

35(10):1445-1461. 

[11]  Brightman LA, et al: Ablative and fractional ablative lasers. 

Dermatol Clin 2009 Oct: 27(4):479-489, vi-vii. 

[12]  Roland Kaufmann, Christian Beier. Erbium:YAG laser 

therapy of the skin lesions. Med Laser Appl 2001; 

16:252-263. 

[13]  Khatri KA. Ablation of cutaneous lesions using an 

erbium:YAG laser. J Cosmetic and Laser Ther 2003;5:1-4. 

[14]  Dmovesk-Olup B, Vedlin B. Use of Er:YAg laser for benign 

skin disorders. Laser Surg Med 1997;21(1):13-19. 

[15]  Kaufman R, Hibst R. Pulsed erbium:YAG laser ablation in 

cutaneous surgery. Laser Surg Med 1996; 19:324-30. 

[16]  Beier C, Kaufman R. Efficacy of erbium:YAG laser ablation 

in Darrier disease and Hailey-Hailey disease. Arch Dermatol 

1999;135:423-7. 

[17]  Alora MB, Arndt KA. Treatment of café-au-lait macule with 

erbium:YAG laser. Arch Dermatol 2001;45:566-8. 

[18]  Ammirati CT, Giancola JM, Hruza GJ. Adult-onset facial 

colloid millium successfully treated with the long-pulsed 

Er:YAG laser. Dermatol Surg 2002;28:215-19. 

[19]  Manstein D, Herron GS, Sink RK, Tanner H& Anderson 

RR.Fractional photothermolysis: a new concept for cutaneous 

remodeling using microscopic patterns of thermal injury. 

Lasers Surg Med 2004;34:426-38. 

[20]  Glaich AS, Rahman Z, Goldberg LH, Friedman PM. 

Fractional resurfacing for the treatment of hypopigmented 

scars: A pilot study. Dermatol Surg. 2007; 33: 289–94. 

[21]  Behroozan DS, Goldberg LH, Dai T, Geronemus RG, 

Friedman PM. Fractional photothermolysis for the treatment 

of surgical scars: A case report. J Cosmet Laser Ther. 

2006;8:35–8. 

[22]  Alster TS, Tanzi EL, Lazarus M. The use of fractional laser 

photothermolysis for the treatment of atrophic scars. 

Dermatol Surg 2007;33(3):295-299. 

[23]  Holland DB, Jeremy AH, Roberts SG, Seukeran DC, Layton 

AM, Cunliffe WJ. Inflammation in acne scarring: A 

comparison of the responses in lesions from patients prone 

and not prone to scar. Br J Dermatol. 2004;150:72–81. 

[24]  Jacob CI, Dover JS, Kaminer MS. Acne scarring: A 

classification system and review of treatment options. J Am 

Acad Dermatol. 2001;45:109–17. 

[25]  Jordan R, Cummins C, Burls A. Laser resurfacing of the skin 

for the improvement of facial acne scarring: Asystematic 

review of the evidence. Br J Dermatol. 2000;142:413–23. 

[26]  Weinstein C, Scheflan M. Simultaneously combined 

ER:YAG and carbon dioxide laser (derma K) for skin 

resurfacing. Clin Plast Surg. Apr 2000;27(2):273-85, xi.   

[27]  Mario AT, Serge M, Mariano V. Results of fractional ablative 

facial skin resurfacing with the Er:YAG laser 1 week and 2 

months after one single treatment in 30 patients. Laser Med 

Sci


 

2009; 24 (2):186-94. 

[28]  Sukal Sa, Geronemus RG. Fractional photothermolysis. J 

Drug Dermatol 2008;7:118-122. 

[29]  Mohammad Y. The efficacy and safety of ablative fractional 

CO2 laser for treatment of acne scar. JSMC 2012; 2 (1): 30-5. 

[30]  W. Manuskiatti. Comparison of Fractional Er:YAG and 

Carbon Dioxide Lasers in Resurfacing of Atrophic Scars in 

Asians. Dermatol Surg 2013; 39(1 pt 1):    111-20. 

[31]  Adrian RM. Pulsed carbon dioxide and  erbium-YAG laser 

resurfacing: a comparative clinical study. J Cutan Laser Ther 

1999;1:29-35 

[32]  Roland K. Christian B. Erbium:YAG laser therapy of skin 

lesions. Med Laser Appl 2001;16:252-253. 

[33]  Khatri KA. Ablation of cutaneous lesions using an 

erbium:YAG laser. J Cosmetic and Laser Ther 2003;5:1-4.



 



Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə