Working-afhdr-niger-malawi



Yüklə 0,84 Mb.

səhifə1/29
tarix05.02.2018
ölçüsü0,84 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   29


 

 

 

 

 



WP 2012-002:  February 2012 

 

 

 

Food Price Volatility over the Last Decade 

in Niger and Malawi: Extent, Sources and 

Impact on Child Malnutrition 

 

Giovanni Andrea Cornia, Laura Deotti and Maria Sassi



1

 

                                                            



1

 Giovanni Andrea Cornia University of Florence, Department of Economics, e-mail: giovanniandrea.cornia@unifi.it

.

     


 Laura  Deotti,  COOPI  Pader  –  North  Uganda,  e-mail:  laura.deotti@gmail.com.  Maria  Sassi,  University  of  Pavia, 

Department of Economics and Management Studies, email: msassi@eco.unipv.it. Comments should be addressed 

by email to the author(s). 

 

This paper  is part of a series  of recent research  commissioned for the African Human Development  Report.  The 



authors  include  leading  academics  and  practitioners  from  Africa  and  around  the  world,  as  well  as  UNDP 

researchers. The findings, interpretations and conclusions are strictly those of the authors and do not necessarily 

represent the views of UNDP or United Nations Member States. Moreover, the data may not be consistent with 

that presented in the African Human Development Report. 




Abstract: Recently, considerable attention has rightly been paid to the nutritional impact of the sharp 

hikes in international food prices which took place in 2007-8 and, again, in 2010-11. While sacrosanct, 

this growing focus has somewhat obscured the effect of other factors which do affect malnutrition in 

the Sub-Saharan Africa context, i.e. the long term impact of agricultural policies, huge and persistent 

seasonal  variation  in  domestic  food  prices,  and  the  impact  of  famines  which still  regularly  stalk  the 

continent. This paper focuses on the relative weight of these factors in explaining child malnutrition 

(proxied by the number of child admissions to feeding centers) in Malawi and Niger, two prototypical 

countries in the region. The analysis shows that the drivers of domestic food staple prices and of the 

ensuing  child  malnutrition  have  to  be  found  not  only  –  or  not  primarily  –  in  the  changes  of 

international  food  prices  but  mainly  in  the  impact  of  agricultural  policies  on  food  production,  the 

persistence  of  a  strong  food  price  seasonality,  and  recurrent  and  often  poorly  attended  famines. 

Indeed,  even  during  years  of  declines  in  international  food  prices,  these  factors  often  exert  a  huge 

upward pressures on domestic food prices and child malnutrition.  

 

Keywords: Food prices, Famines, Seasonality, Food Policy,  Child malnutrition, Niger, Malawi 



 

JEL Classification: I38, Q13, Q18

 

Acknowledgements:  The  authors  would  like  to  thank  warmly  all  the  people  who  provided  data, 

comments  and  bibliographical  material  for  the  preparation  of  this  paper.  Among  them:  Guido 

Cornale,  Gwénola  Desplats  and  Eric-Alain  Ategbo  (Unicef-Niger),  Djibril  Sadou  (SIMA-Niger),  Jean-

Mathieu Bloch (Dispositif National de Gestion et de Prévention des Crises Alimentaires”- Niger), Hama 

Abdou Yacouba (FEWS-Net Niger), Bruno Martorano and Linda Menchi Rogai (University of Florence)  

Alexandre  Castellano  (COOPI,  Malawi),  Paola  Fava  (COOPI);  James  Bwirani  (FEWSNet,  Malawi),    Olex 

Kamowa (FEWSNet  Malawi), Fydess Mkomba (Centre For Social Concern, Malawi), and an anonymous 

UNDP referee. The usual caveats apply. 



 

 



1.

 

Introduction 

 

After peaking in 1974, the real international (US$) food prices declined steadily till 1990 and 

then stagnated at a comparatively low level until mid 2007 (Figure 1), suggesting that with a 

growth of 1-1.5 per cent a year supply was growing faster than effective demand.

 

However, 



between June 2007 and June 2008 international food prices rose sharply, while  the decline 

observed  between  mid  2008  and  mid  2010  did  not  offset  its  prior  increase.  In  addition,  the 

international food prices have surged again at a fast rate since mid 2010, and in January-May 

2011 they had already exceeded the peak recorded in mid 2008 (Figure 2). The FAO estimates 

that these two surges in international food prices caused a marked increase in malnutrition in 

developing countries, as the rise in international prices was ‘passed through’ onto domestic 

prices.  For  instance,  between  2005  and  2008  the  number  of  undernourished  people  rose 

from 850 million to 963 million, and reached the historical peak of 1.02 billion people in 2009 

(FAO, 2010), while the Development Committee of the World Bank-IMF (2011) estimates that 

the  current  food  price  spike  has  resulted  in  an  estimated  net  increase  of  44  million  more 

people in poverty. 

Figure 1 - Price indexes (1990 constant US$ prices) for petroleum, grains and all food

 (1960-


2008) 

Source: World Bank Commodity Price Data 

At  the  level  of  each  single  country,  however,  the  transmission  of  changes  in  international 

food  prices  on  domestic  food  prices  is  far  than  straightforward,  and  the  extent  of  such 

transmission varies a lot according to its dependence on food imports, transport costs, pass-

through  margins,  tradability  of  domestic  foods,  exchange  rate  variations  and  so  on.  In 

addition, the impact on malnutrition depends very much on the speed of such transmission, 

as  a  sharp  short-term  adjustment  of  domestic  to  world  prices  may  impact  the  poor 

negatively,  while  a  gradual  transmission  over  the  medium-long  term  might  not  harm  their 

nutritional status. 

Thus,  whether,  by  how  much,  and  at  what  speed  surges  in  international  food  prices  are 

passed on to domestic prices is a matter for empirical investigation. In this regard, it is worth 

recalling that in many SSA countries domestic food prices have often exhibited huge spikes 

and  considerable  volatility  even  during  the  long  period  of  stability  -  or  even  decline  -  in 

international food prices depicted in Figure 1. 





Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   29


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə