Wqwm ac0603 aksum indd



Yüklə 40,65 Kb.

tarix08.03.2018
ölçüsü40,65 Kb.


1

Research Reports: Daily Life in Ancient Times

Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Daily Life in Aksum

Aksum was a powerful and wealthy ancient kingdom. Located in East Africa, 

it was very infl uential between 

A

.

D



. 50 and 600. During this time, goods from 

all over the ancient world were traded in Aksum. Immense wealth moved 

through Adulis, Aksum’s main port. In this thriving kingdom, the daily life of 

its people varied depending on a person’s work and religious beliefs.

By using primary and secondary sources, historians have been able to 

fi gure out what many Aksumites, or people from Aksum, did for a living. 

The importance of trade allowed many people to gain wealth by working as 

merchants. These businesspeople exported gold, ivory, and spices to Arabia, 

Egypt, Greece, and Rome. In exchange for these goods, merchants received 

cloth, jewelry, metals, and steel for weapons. The merchants came in contact 

with people from many different areas. As a result, they were aware of news 

and ideas from cultures as far away as India.

Some people in Aksum worked as farmers. They brought mountain water 

to the fi elds by building dams and digging canals and ponds to hold water. 

However, Aksum’s land had many hills so it didn’t hold moisture very well.  

To solve this problem, farmers built level areas of land on the hillsides. These 

were called terraces and they helped hold water, which improved farming. 

Other Aksumites worked as builders and architects. Archaeologists have 

found several monuments, palaces, thrones, and stone pillars that were built 

by the people of Aksum. The rulers of Aksum had the stories of their military 

conquests carved onto thrones and pillars. The following account was 

carved onto a throne for King Ezana to honor his victory:

And I set up a throne here in Shado [Aksum] by the might of the Lord of 

Heaven who has helped me and given me supremacy. May the Lord of 

Heaven reinforce my reign. And, as he has now defeated my enemies for 

me, may he continue to do so wherever I go.

The text of King Ezana’s victory contains a clue to another important 

aspect of people’s lives in Aksum—religion. For many years, the Aksumites 

worshiped many gods. Then, around 

A

.



D

. 330, King Ezana converted to 

Christianity. He soon made Christianity the offi cial religion of Aksum. 



2

Eventually, Christianity spread throughout the region. Monks brought the 

Christian message to the interior of Aksum. They also replaced local temples 

and shrines with Christian churches and monasteries.

Learning was also important in the lives of some Aksumites. The written 

language of Aksum was called Ge’ez. It is a form of Arabic that has been 

modifi ed by the Greek and Kushitic languages. Part of why we know so 

much about Aksum is because the Aksumites preserved their rulers’ written 

documents.

The daily lives of Aksumites varied depending on their work. Aksumites 

worked as merchants, farmers, builders, architects, and monks. The 

Christian religion became important in many of their lives, starting with the 

conversion of King Ezana around 

A

.



D

. 330. The Aksumites also emphasized 

learning by preserving their history through written documents.

Bibliography

Primary Sources

Ezana. “DAE 11.” in Stuart Munro-Hay. An African Civilization of Late 

Antiquity

Antiquity. ed. Alan Light. 1991. May 27, 2005. 

aksum/mhak4.html#c11-5-dae11>.

Web sites

“Aksum.” Encyclopaedia Britannica Online

Encyclopaedia Britannica Online. May 27, 2005. 

eb.com/>.

“eastern Africa, history of.” Encyclopaedia Britannica Online

Encyclopaedia Britannica Online. May 27, 

2005. 

.

 “The Kingdom of Aksum.” About.com. May 27, 2005. 

com/>.


Encyclopedia articles

Rowe, John A. “Ethiopia.” The World Book Multimedia Encyclopedia

The World Book Multimedia Encyclopedia. 2001.

Spitzer, Leo. “Aksum.” The World Book Multimedia Encyclopedia

The World Book Multimedia Encyclopedia. 2001.

Books

McDougal Littell. World History: Ancient Civilizations

World History: Ancient Civilizations. Evanston: 

McDougal Littell, a division of Houghton Miffl in Company, 2006. 197–200.

Research Reports: Daily Life in Ancient Times

Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.




3

Organization

A research report has three basic parts: the introduction, the body, and the 

conclusion. The introduction gives 

background

 and states the 



topic

.  The body 

provides engaging 

details

 on the topic and the conclusion 



summarizes

 the 


information. What aspect of daily life in Egypt or Kush will you write about?

Daily Life in Aksum

 

Aksum was a powerful and wealthy ancient kingdom. Located in East 

Africa, it was very infl uential between 

A

.



D

. 50 and 600. During this time, 

goods from all over the ancient world were traded in Aksum. Immense 

wealth moved through Adulis, Aksum’s main port. In this thriving kingdom, 

the daily life of the people varied depending on a person’s work and 

religious beliefs.

By using primary and secondary sources, historians have been able to 

fi gure out what many Aksumites, or people from Aksum, did for a living. 

The importance of trade allowed many people to gain wealth by working 

as merchants. These businesspeople exported gold, ivory, and spices to 

Arabia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. In exchange for these goods, merchants 

received cloth, jewelry, metals, and steel for weapons. The merchants came 

in contact with people from many different areas. As a result, they were 

aware of news and ideas from cultures as far away as India.

Some people in Aksum worked as farmers. They brought mountain 

water to the fi elds by building dams and digging canals and ponds to hold 

water. However, Aksum’s land had many hills so it didn’t hold moisture 

very well.  To solve this problem, farmers built level areas of land on the 

hillsides. These were called terraces and they helped hold water, which 

improved farming. 



introduction

body

 details

topic

background

Daily Life in Aksum



 details

Research Reports: Daily Life in Ancient Times

Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.



4

Other Aksumites worked as builders and architects. Archaeologists 

have found several monuments, palaces, thrones, and stone pillars that 

were built by the people of Aksum. The rulers of Aksum had the stories 

of their military conquests carved onto thrones and pillars. The following 

account was carved onto a throne for King Ezana to honor his victory:

And I set up a throne here in Shado [Aksum] by the might of the Lord 

of Heaven who has helped me and given me supremacy. May the 

Lord of Heaven reinforce my reign. And, as he has now defeated my 

enemies for me, may he continue to do so wherever I go.

The text of King Ezana’s victory contains a clue to another important 

aspect of people’s lives in Aksum—religion. For many years, the Aksumites 

worshiped many gods. Then, around 

A

.



D

. 330, King Ezana converted to 

Christianity. He soon made Christianity the offi cial religion of Aksum. 

Eventually, Christianity spread throughout the region. Monks brought 

the Christian message to the interior of Aksum. They also replaced local 

temples and shrines with Christian churches and monasteries.

Learning was also important in the lives of some Aksumites. The 

written language of Aksum was called Ge’ez. It is a form of Arabic that has 

been modifi ed by the Greek and Kushitic languages. Part of why we know 

so much about Aksum is because the Aksumites preserved their rulers’ 

written documents.

The daily lives of Aksumites varied depending on their work. Aksumites 

worked as merchants, farmers, builders, architects, and monks. The 

Christian religion became important in many of their lives, starting with the 

conversion of King Ezana around 

A

.



D

. 330. The Aksumites also emphasized 

learning by preserving their history through written documents.

Daily Life in Aksum (continued)



body

conclusion

summary

 details

 details

 details

Research Reports: Daily Life in Ancient Times

Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.



activities

objects

behaviors

5

Daily Life in Aksum (continued)



Engaging Details

Details can provide a deeper understanding of the history of a particular time period 

and make your research report more interesting to the reader. Research reports can  

use engaging details about the 



objects

, the 


activities

 and 


behaviors

, and the 



laws, 

rules, or rituals

 of a culture. What details will you provide to describe daily life in 

Egypt or Kush?

The importance of trade allowed many people to gain wealth by working as 

merchants. These businesspeople exported gold, ivory, and spices to Arabia, 

Egypt, Greece, and Rome. In exchange for these goods, merchants received 

cloth, jewelry, metals, and steel for weapons.

Some people in Aksum worked as farmers. They brought mountain 

water to the fi elds by building dams and digging canals and ponds to hold 

water. However, Aksum’s land had many hills so it didn’t hold moisture very 

well.  To solve this problem, farmers built level areas of land on the hillsides. 

These were called terraces and they helped hold water, which improved 

farming.

The rulers of Aksum had the stories of their military conquests carved onto 

thrones and pillars. The following account was carved onto a throne for 

King Ezana to honor his victory:

And I set up a throne here in Shado [Aksum] by the might of the Lord of 

Heaven who has helped me and given me supremacy. May the Lord of 

Heaven reinforce my reign. And, as he has now defeated my enemies for 

me, may he continue to do so wherever I go.

Research Reports: Daily Life in Ancient Times

Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.




laws, rules 

or rituals

6

Daily Life in Aksum (continued)



For many years, the Aksumites worshiped many gods. Then, around 

A

.



D

.

330, King Ezana converted to Christianity. He soon made Christianity the 



offi cial religion of Aksum. Eventually, Christianity spread throughout the 

region. Monks brought the Christian message to the interior of Aksum. 

They also replaced local temples and shrines with Christian churches and 

monasteries.

Research Reports: Daily Life in Ancient Times

Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.




7

Bibliography

A bibliography lists the sources used for writing a research report. Remember, your 

bibliography for this assignment should contain a primary source, a Web site, an 

encyclopedia article, and a book. If possible, each citation should include the title, 

author, publisher, date, page number, or Web address. When you have more than 

one source in a category you should list them alphabetically. Use the format below 

for your bibliography.



Primary Sources

Ezana. “DAE 11.” in Stuart Munro-Hay. An African Civilization of Late 

Antiquity

Antiquity. ed. Alan Light. 1991. May 27, 2005.

aksum/mhak4.html#c11-5-dae11>.

Web sites

“Aksum.” Encyclopaedia Britannica Online

Encyclopaedia Britannica Online. May 27, 2005. 

eb.com/>.

“eastern Africa, history of.” Encyclopaedia Britannica Online

Encyclopaedia Britannica Online. May 27, 2005. 





.

 “The Kingdom of Aksum.” About.com. May 27, 2005. 

com/>.


Encyclopedia articles

Rowe, John A. “Ethiopia.” The World Book Multimedia Encyclopedia

The World Book Multimedia Encyclopedia. 2001.

Spitzer, Leo. “Aksum.” The World Book Multimedia Encyclopedia

The World Book Multimedia Encyclopedia. 2001.

Books

McDougal Littell. World History: Ancient Civilizations

World History: Ancient Civilizations. Evanston: McDougal 

Littell, a division of Houghton Miffl in Company, 2006. 197–200.

Daily Life in Aksum (continued)

Research Reports: Daily Life in Ancient Times



Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.



Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə