X All-optical flip-flops based on semiconductor technologies



Yüklə 0,55 Mb.

səhifə1/18
tarix11.10.2017
ölçüsü0,55 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   18


All-optical lip-lops based on semiconductor technologies

347


All-optical lip-lops based on semiconductor technologies

Antonella Bogoni, Gianluca Berrettini, Paolo Gheli, Antonio Malacarne, Gianluca Meloni, 

Luca Potì and Jing Wang

 

All-optical flip-flops based on  



semiconductor technologies  

 

Antonella Bogoni



1

, Gianluca Berrettini

2

, Paolo Ghelfi



1

,  


Antonio Malacarne

2

, Gianluca Meloni



1

, Luca Potì

1

 and Jing Wang



3

 

1



Consorzio Nazionale Interuniversitario per le Telecomunicazioni (CNIT), Pisa 

Italy 

2

 Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa

  

Italy 

3

Department of Electronic Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 

China 

 

1. Introduction  



 

 

 

 

Optical technologies represent the main bet for future communication systems. Among the 



others, digital subsystems for optical processing are of great interest thanks to their intrinsic 

properties  in  terms  of  bandwidth,  transparency,  immunity  to  the  electromagnetic 

interference,  cost,  power  consumption,  as  well  as  robustness  in  hostile  environment.  Key 

basic  functions  are  represented  by  logic  gate,  logic  function,  flip-flop  memories,  optical 

random access memories, etc.. Research in this field is in its very early stages even if some 

interesting  techniques  have  been  already  theoretically  addressed  and  experimentally 

demonstrated.  Here  we  review  the  state  of  the  art  for  all-optical  flip-flop  based  on 

semiconductor  technologies:  best  result  will  be  highlighted  in  terms  of  transition  speed, 

switching  energy,  complexity  and  power  consumption;  we  will  then  discuss  some  new 

achievement we have recently reached. 

All-optical packet switching seems to be the most promising way to take advantage of fiber 

bandwidth to increase routers forwarding capacity, being able to achieve very high data rate 

operations. All-optical flip-flops have been widely investigated mainly because they can be 

exploited  in  all-optical  packet  switches,  where  switching,  routing  and  forwarding  are 

directly  carried  out  in  the  optical  domain.  Some  examples  concerning  optical  packet 

switches are shown in (Dorren et al., 2003; Liu et al., 2005; Bogoni et al., 2007; Herrera et al., 

2007),  where  an  optical  flip-flop  stores  the  switch  control  information  and  drives  the 

switching  operation.  Former  solutions  for  all-optical  flip-flops  have  been  demonstrated 

exploiting discrete devices (Dorren et al., 2003) or Erbium-doped fiber properties (Malacarne 

et  al.,  2007)  which  suffer  from  slow  switching  times  and  high  set/reset  input  powers. 

Several  integrated  or  integrable  solutions  (Hill  et  al.,  2004;  Liu  et  al.,  2006)  present  a 

switching energy in the fJ range and switching times of tens of ps at the expenses of poor 

contrast ratios. On the other hand in (Hill et al., 2005) an integrated scheme exhibiting a very 

high contrast ratio value but with transition times in the ns range is reported. In any case a 



15

www.intechopen.com




Semiconductor Technologies

348


 

trade off between contrast ratio and edges speed must be found as a function of the flip-flop 

application.  Micro-resonators-based  bistable  element  has  been  demonstrated  (Van  et  al., 

2002)  presenting  high  optical  operating  power,  pJ  switching  energies  and  microsecond 

switching  times,  theoretically  reducible  down  to  the  order  of  tens  of  ps.  Making  a 

comparison with electronics, recent large-scale integration (LSI) circuits (Keyes, 2001) show 

switching energies of 1fJ even though with slower switching speeds. In (Dorren et al., 2003), 

a solution based on coupled ring lasers is proposed. This solution offers a certain number of 

advantages: it can provide high contrast ratios between states; there is no difference in the 

mechanisms for switching from state 1 to state 2 and vice-versa, making symmetric set and 

reset  operations;  it  presents  a  large  input  light  wavelength  range  and  a  controllable 

switching threshold. Moreover, considering an integrated version of this kind of flip-flop, 

through numerical analysis a switching energy in fJ range has been demonstrated.  

Here  we  will  describe  the  above  mentioned  solutions  underlining  the  main  benefits, 

drawback, limitation and perspectives. We will then present our activities on clocked flip-

flops, and an example of their use in an all-optical counter. Finally, we will present an SOA-

based flip-flop which is able to switch with very short rising and falling edges, and we use it 

in a realistic switching operation. Integrability of our solutions is also discussed. 

 

2. State of the art 

 

One  of  the  simplest  way  that  was  originally  proposed  to  implement  an  optical  flip-flop 



includes two coupled lasers (Hill et al., 2001), as depicted in Fig. 1 (a). The system can have 

two stable states. In state 1, light from laser 1 suppresses lasing in laser 2. In this state, the 

optical flip-flop memory emits CW light at wavelength 

1



. Conversely, in state 2, light from 

laser  2  suppresses  lasing  in  laser  1,  and  the  optical  flip-flop  memory  emits  CW  light  at 

wavelength 

2



. To change states, lasing in the dominant laser can be inhibited by injecting 

external  light  with  a  different  wavelength  and  opportune  power.  The  output  pulse  of  an 

optical  header  processor  can  be  used  to  set  the  optical  flip-flop  memory  into  the  desired 

wavelength.  From  the  theory  it  also  follows  that  laser  driving  currents  and  coupling 

coefficient determines the required switching light power. 

This flip-flop has also been implemented in a ring configuration based on Semiconductor 

Optical Amplifiers (SOA), as shown in Fig. 1 (b) (Dorren et al., 2003). Two SOAs act as the 

lasers gain media. Fabry–Pérot filters (FPF) with a bandwidth of 0.18nm have been used as 

wavelength selective elements. Optical pulses were used to set and reset the flip-flop. The 

optical spectrum of the flip-flops’ output states is shown in Fig. 2. 

The switching time between the two lasing modes is inversely proportional to the length of 

the laser cavities. Thus, in order to allow switching times in the range  of picoseconds, an 

integrated  solution  has  to  be  adopted.  This  was  realized  in  (Hill  et  al.,  2004),  where  a 

photonic  flip-flop  based  on  two  coupled  micro-ring  lasers  with  dimensions  of  20x40 

m

2

 



was reported, exhibiting a switching time of 18ps and a switching energy of a few fJ. 

The micro-ring lasers were fabricated in active areas of the integrated circuit containing bulk 

1.55nm  bandgap  InGaAsP  in  the  light  guiding  layer.  Separate  electrical  contacts  allowed 

each  laser’s  wavelength  to  be  individually  tuned  by  adjusting  the  laser  current.  Passive 

waveguides connected the micro-ring lasers to the integrated circuit edges (Fig. 3). Micro-

ring lasers typically have two inherent lasing modes; laser light traveling in the clockwise 

(CW) direction, and laser light in the anticlockwise (ACW) direction.  

 

 



(a)  

 

 



 

 

(b) 



Fig.  1.  (a):  Arrangement  of  two  coupled  identical  lasing  cavities  forming  a  flip-flop, 

showing the two possible states. (b): Implementation of the optical flip-flop memory 

 

 

Fig. 2. Spectral output of two states of the optical flip-flop memory. 



 

 

Fig. 3. Two micro-ring lasers coupled via a waveguide to form an optical flip-flop. 



 

In state A, CW light from laser A is injected via the waveguide into laser B. The light from 

laser A will undergo significant resonant amplification in laser B if the resonant frequencies 

of  the  two  laser  cavities  are  close.  This  injected  light  competes  with  the  laser  B  self-

oscillations for available power from the laser gain medium. If sufficient light is injected into 

laser B, then the laser B gain will be decreased below threshold. This extinguishes the laser B 

self-oscillation, and laser A captures or injection-locks (Buczek et al., 1971) laser B, forcing 

light to circulate only in the CW direction. To set the system in one state or another, light 

www.intechopen.com





Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   18


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə