Zygomycota



Yüklə 79,83 Kb.

tarix23.01.2018
ölçüsü79,83 Kb.


Zygomycota 


Zygomycota 

About 1%, ~ 1000 species of the named species of true 

fungi 

 

Common species are saprobic, molds of fruit, grains 



 Mucor, Rhizopus 

Many are common on dung of various animals 

 Pilobolus, Phycomyces, Coemansia 

Others have highly specialized symbioses 

 Endogone, ectomycorrhizal 

 Zoopagales, parasites of rotifers, tardigrades 

 Entomophthorales, parasites of insects 

 Harpellales & Asellariales ( Trichomycetes ),   

 

 specialized gut commensals of arthropods 



 Some Mucorales are mycoparasites 

  



Relationship of the Zygomycota to the other phyla 

of Fungi is not completely clear and relationships of 

taxa within the Zygomycota are now being revised 


Four subphyla currently recognized in the Zygomycota: 

 Mucormycotina 

 Entomophthoromycotina 

 Kickxellomycotina 

 Zoopagomycotina 

(formerly orders Mucorales, Entomophthorales, 

Zoopagales) 


Two main groups but do not 

correspond to the two 

classes Zygomycetes and 

Trichomycetes 




 

 

 Zygomycota 

Formerly two Classes based on morphology and ecology: 

 Zygomycetes  

   Wide diversity of forms 

   Various ecological modes 

      Saprobes, soil and dung 

      Parasites of small animals, insects 

      Parasites of other fungi 

      Opportunistic human/animal pathogens 

      Fruit/grain rots 

      Ectomycorrhizal (Endogonales) 

 Trichomycetes (Harpellales, Asellariales) 

      Specialized parasites of arthropods 



 

Zygomycota orders 

   

Mucorales 

 Rhizopus 

 Pilobolus 

 Phycomyces 

   Mortierellales 

 Mortierella 

   Dimargaritales 

 Piptocephalis 

   Kickxellales 

 Coemansia, Spirodactylon 

   Endogonales 

 Endogone 

   Entomophthorales 

 Entomophthora  

   Zoopagales 

 Amoebophilus 

 Euryncale 

   Harpellales 

 e. g. Furcuolmyces boomerangus 

 

  

  

  

 

 


General characteristics of Zygomycota 

 

•       Primitive  early diverging fungal lineage      

•      <1% of all known species of fungi, ~1000 species  

•       primary colonizers of most substrates  sugar fungi  

•       most species have thallus of coenocytic hyphae 

•       haploid nuclei in vegetative stage  

•       chitin cell walls  

•       no flagellated cell 

•       no centrioles; possess spindle pole bodies (SPBs)  

 



Ecological diversity of Zygomycetes 

Saprobes in soil and dung 

 Mucorales, Mortierellales, Kickxellales 

Parasites of invertebrates, insects, rotifers, amoebae 

 Entomophthorales, Zoopagales 

Mycoparasites 

 Mucorales, Dimargaritales, Zoopagales 

Ectomycorrhizal 

 Endogonales 

Human pathogens 

 Mucorales, Entomophthorales 

 

Obligate gut parasites of arthropods   

  Trichomycetes  (Hapellales) 

 

 


Importance of Zygomycetes 

Used in soy fermentations 

 Rhizopus oligosporus tempeh 

 Actinomucor elegans tofu 

Human and animal pathogens 

 Basidiobolus and others, mucormycoses 

Storage rots of fruits 

 Rhizopus stolonifer 

Plant pathogens 

 Gilbertella, Rhizopus (endosymbiotic Burkholderia) 

Bioinsecticides, biocontrol 

 Entomophaga maimaga 

 


Sexual reproduction by production of 

zygospores (=thick-walled resting spores) 

within zygosporangia that are formed by 

fusion of gametangia, hyphal branches 

•  zygos (Gr.) - yoke, joining 

•  refers to the fusion of gametangia to form a unique  

  structure called the zygosporangium 

www.botany.hawaii.edu/faculty/wong/Bot201/Zygomycota/Zygomycota.htm



zygosporangium 

suspensors 


Zygosporangia 

mating in 

Zygomycetes by 

isogamous hyphal 

fusion 


Sexual reproduction 

 

•  gametangial copulation, somatogamy      

•  conjugation by two morphologically similiar gametangia 

•  gametangia are differentiated hyphal branches 

•  differentiation in Mucorales controlled by pheromones  

•  produce a zygosporangium  

•  homo- & heterothallic species (unifactorial)  

botit.botany.wisc.edu/images/332/Zygomycota/



zygosporangium 

gametangia 


•  formation of specialized hyphae: zygophores  

•  compatible zygophores are attracted to each other by     



pheromones of the opposite mating type, trisporic acids 

•  fuse in pairs at their tips; form fusion septum  

•  tips of zygophores swell to form progametangia  

Sexual  

reproduction 



•  gametangial septum forms near tips of progametangia 

  

•  terminal cell is gametangium  

•  subterminal cell is suspensor cell  



•  fusion septum dissolves  

•  plasmogamy results in prozygosporangium  

•  followed by karyogamy, enlargement, development of thick  

  multilayered wall: zygosporangium  



Zygospore germination  

 

•  zygospore doesn't equal zygosporangium 



produced within zygosporangium 

  

•  typically long resting period prior to germination 



  

•  zygosporangium cracks open  



zygospore germinates a sporangiophore that develops  

a germ sporangium 

 

•  meiosis occurs before or during zygospore germination  



      followed by numerous rounds of mitosis 

 

•  germ sporangium produces sporangiospores that are  



dispersed, germinate, & produce a mycelium 


Rhizopus life cycle 

germ sporangium 

asexual 

reproduction 

asexual 

reproduction 

sexual 

reproduction 

mating type +

mating type -


Progametangia 

Mycelium 



Gametangia 



Suspensors 

Zygote 


Zygosporangium 

plasmogamy 



Zygomycete pheromones, trisporic acids 

+ and – mating types produce phermones that are 

converted to trisporic acid by the opposite mating type 


Sexual compatibility in Rhizopus 

 

A.F. Blakeslee 1904  

 first example of sexual incompatibility in fungi  

 somes species could only produce zygospores when  

 paired with certain isolates  

 designated +/-  

 

Burgeff 1924  

 First demonstration of pheromones in fungi 

 hormonal substance responsible for incompatibility trisporic acid  

 each strain produces precursor molecules that the  

 compatible strain converts to trisporic acid (TSA)  

 TSA triggers positive feedback & production of more precursor 

 results in maturation of gametangia and gametangial fusion  

 Induces zygophore formation 

Represses sporangiophore formation 

 



Zygomycete pheromones 

 

B-carotene, trisporic acid 


Asexual Reproduction 

•  Sporangia  

–  Sporangiospores delimited from cytoplasm by 

cleavage vesicle fusion, similar to free cell formation 

•  Sporangiola 

–  Reduced sporangia having one or a few 

sporangiospores.  Single sporangiola resemble 

conidia. 




•  sporangioles 

 reduced sporangia with or w/o columella  

           produce one to few spores 

•  sporangia and sporangioles can be formed on the same  



 sporangiophore 

sporangiospores 

asexual reproduction 

 

some sporangiospores look 

like conidia, but have an outer 

sporangial wall--derived from 

larger multi-spored sporangia 


Phylum Zygomycota

 

•  10 Orders, ~168 genera, ~1000 species 



–  Mucorales 

–  Mortierellales 

–  Endogonales 

–  Kickxellales 

–  Dimargaritales 

–  Basidiobolales (Basidiobolaceae) 

–  Zoopagales 

–  Entomophthorales 

–  Harpellales 

–  Asellariales 

 

Under revision, the 12 clades identified by molecular systematics 

do not correspond exactly to the 10 orders currently recognized 



MUCORALES 

 

 

largest order, 47 genera, 130 species  

 most common species  

 used in industry and food production  

 Rhizopus spp. used in industry  

fumaric, lactic, citric, succinic & oxalic 

acids 

food production 

tempeh  


Structures 

 

•  coenocytic hyphae 

•  septa associated only with reproductive structures  

•  rhizoids: root-like hyphae that adhere reproductive  



 structures to substrate  

•  stolon: connect two groups of rhizoids  



rhizoids 

stolon 


Sporangia of Phycomyces 

Phototropic sporangia 

have been used as 

model systems for 

study of photorecptors 


•  sporangiophores simple to branched 

•  sporangium: +/- columella with outer sporiferous region 

•  sporangium produces thousands of sporangiospores  

sporangiophore 

sporangium 

sporiferous region 

columella 

]

Asexual reproduction 

www.uoguelph.ca/~gbarron/MISCELLANEOUS/rhizopus.htm



Mucor 

sporangium 

columella 

sporangiospores 

sporangiophore 


Sporangiolum 

•  A reduced 

sporangium 

containing 1-50 

sporangiospores 

•  Merosporangium 

is a sporangiolum 

with spores in 

linear series 



Ecology 

•  Saprotrophs 

– Soil, dung, humus 

•  Plant pathogens 

– Choanephora cucurbitarium 

•  on flowers & fruits of cucurbits 

– Rhizopus stolonifer 

•  Post-harvest pathogen of 

strawberries, sweet potatoes 

•  Animal/human pathogens 

– Species of Absidia, Mucor, Rhizopus, 

Saksanea – zygomycoses, 

mucormycoses 

•  Mycoparasites on various other fungi 



Pilobolaceae 

 

Pilobolus (hat thrower) 

 

•  sporangiophore extending from substrate  

•  end of sporangiophore is a swollen  

 subsporangial vesicle (ssv)  

•  sporangium sits on top of the ssv  

•  ssv is directed towards light by carotenoid ring 

•  ssv acts as lens concentrating light rays  

•  pressure builds up in the ssv, propelling the sporangium  

 up to 2 meters  

•  sporangium sticks vegetation  

•  sporangia are ingested by animal, pass through GI 

 tract & spores germinate in dung  

SSV 

sporangium 

carotenoid ring 




Thamnidium 

 

Sporangia and sporangiola on the 



same sporangiophore 


Syncephalastrum 

 

Merosporangia - 



sporangiospores in linear series 


Syncephalis (11) and Piptocephalis (12) 

merosporangia 


Choanephora and Cunninghamella 

Sporangiola formed on 

separate sporangiophores 



Entomophthorales 

 

•  parasites on insects  

•  Entomophthora muscae on common house fly  

•  conidia actively dispersed  

•  some have septate mycelium; break into hyphal bodies (hb)  

  

•  hb germinate to produce asexual spores  



  

•  two hb may act as gametangia, copulate, lateral outgrowth  



 develop into zygosporangium containing a zygospore  

www.uoguelph.ca/~gbarron/MISCELLANEOUS/ento2.htm



conidia 

hyphal 

body 

www.mycolog.com/CHAP3b.htm




Entomophthora maimaga 

Being used as a biopesticide to control gypsy moth 


Etienne Leopold Trouvelot 

Settled in Medford Mass. in 1853. 

He was an amateur entomologist 

and wanted to start a silk industry 

in the USA.  He introduced the 

European Gypsy Moth after a visit 

to France in the 1860s.  

 

Larvae escaped from the 

population he was tending on trees 

in his back yard, after which he 

apparently lost interest in 

entomology and took up 

astronomy.  


Trouvelot later worked at 

Harvard University and 

the Naval Observatory 

(now where the vice 

president lives) 


Family Basidiobolaceae 

1 Genus, 4 species 

 

Basidiobolus, saprobic, also cause of subcutaneous 



zygomycosis in humans 


Order Kickxellales 

•  One family, 8 genera, 22 species 

•  Characterized by one-spored sporangiola 

formed on pseudophialides borne on 



sporocladia 

•  Extensively branched, septate mycelium 

•  Saprotrophs, common in soil and dung 



From O Donnell 1979 

merosporangia 

pseudophialides 

sporocladia 



Order Zoopagales 

Mycoparasites and parasites of small animals 

 Predaceous fungi 

Amoebophilus simplex  

Zoophagus insidians 




Euryancale phallospora, an endoparasite of nematodes 

with  phallus shaped  conidia 


Conidia of 

Euryancale are 

adapted to lodge in 

the buccal cavity of 

the nematode, have 

adhesive frill for 

attachment once it is 

ingested 


Piptocephalis and Syncephalis 

 

Biotrophic, haustorial mycoparasites, mainly of Mucoraceae 




Order Dimargaritales 

•  One family, 4 genera, 14 species 

•  Characterized by 2-spored merosporangia 

formed on terminal inflated ampullae  

•  Produce branched, septate hyphae with 

unusual, dumbbell-shaped septal plugs 

•  Obligate mycoparasites of mucoraceous fungi 

–  Biotrophic, haustorial 




Order Endogonales 

Endogonaceae 

 Endogone a zygomycetous truffle,  pea truffle  

 ectomycorrhizal 

 sporocarps contain zygospores 


Order Zoopagales 

•  Five families, 21 genera, 163 species 

•  Coenocytic or septate hyphae 

•  Conidia or multispored merosporangia 

•  All members are obligate parasites of other 

fungi or microscopic animals (amoebae, rotifers, 

nematodes) 

–  Ectoparasitic, endoparasitic or predaceous 

–  Haustoria formed in host in ectoparasitic and 

predaceous species 




 

Class Trichomycetes  

 

Molecular studies show not really a separate class 

 under revision 

2 Orders, 55 Genera, 220 species 

 

• obligately associated with living arthropods 



 often aquatic arthropods 

 insects, millipedes, crustaceans 

• attach to the hindgut via a holdfast 

• grow within the hindgut of their hosts 

Aquatic insect larvae feed on detritus, algae, etc. 

• mostly commensals, some beneficial or antagonists  



• many species produce septate hyphae 

 


Trichomycetes 

 Harpellales 

 

 Smittium 

Zygomycota 

Attach to hindgut of various aquatic arthropods 



Sexual spores - zygospores 

Asexual spores - trichospores 


Harpellales attach to hindgut of various arthropods, mainly aquatic 

insect larvae, also, millipedes, terrestrial beetles, fiddler crabs 

 


Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə