About that Name Launch! Launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station 11 June 2008 at 12: 05pm edt



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About that Name



Launch!

  • Launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station 11 June 2008 at 12:05PM EDT

  • Circular orbit, 565 km altitude (96 min period), 25.6 deg inclination.

  • Communications:





The Observatory





GBM Collaboration



LAT Collaboration

  • France

    • CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/Saclay
  • Italy

    • INFN, ASI, INAF
  • Japan

    • Hiroshima University
    • ISAS/JAXA
    • RIKEN
    • Tokyo Institute of Technology
  • Sweden

    • Royal Institute of Technology (KTH)
    • Stockholm University
  • United States

    • Stanford University (SLAC and HEPL/Physics)
    • University of California at Santa Cruz - Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics
    • Goddard Space Flight Center
    • Naval Research Laboratory
    • Sonoma State University
    • Ohio State University
    • University of Washington


What Makes Fermi Special?

  • Fermi studies gamma rays. Gamma rays are the most powerful form of light. They tell us about extreme conditions, powerful processes, and exotic phenomena.

  • Fermi surveys the whole sky every three hours. Taking advantage of the huge fields of view of the GBM and the LAT, Fermi is operated in a scanning mode that monitors the sky regularly. The reason this survey mode is important is that the gamma-ray sky is dynamic, showing changes on time scales ranging from milliseconds to years.



31 GRBs seen in first month of operations

  • 31 GRBs seen in first month of operations

  • Activation phase complete; all working well

  • Sensitivity as predicted

  • GRB locations within a few degrees of Swift’s



A Gamma-ray burst - gone in a minute



Large Area Telescope First Light!













What Next for Fermi?

  • We have only scratched the surface of what the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope can do.

    • The gamma-ray sky is changing every day, so there is always something new to learn about the extreme Universe.
  • Some results from both the GBM and the LAT are starting to be made public through the Fermi Science Support Center (here at Goddard) this week.

  • Fermi science teams are cooperating with many other missions and observatories to maximize the scientific return.

  • Follow the latest news at the Project Scientist’s blog, http://blogs.nasa.gov/cm/blog/GLAST



Extra Slides

  • Extra Slides



The green crosses show the detected positions of the charged particles, the blue lines show the reconstructed track trajectories, and the yellow line shows the candidate gamma-ray estimated direction.  The red crosses show the detected energy depositions in the calorimeter.  

  • The green crosses show the detected positions of the charged particles, the blue lines show the reconstructed track trajectories, and the yellow line shows the candidate gamma-ray estimated direction.  The red crosses show the detected energy depositions in the calorimeter.  



A Word of Thanks

  • The scientists who are looking at the data pouring in from the Fermi instruments are wildly enthusiastic.

  • We recognize that any project like this is a team effort.

  • On behalf of the scientific community, I want to thank Goddard management, Kevin Grady, the Project Manager, and everyone who had anything to do with planning, building, testing, launching, and operating the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We will do our best to provide you with some exciting scientific results.




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