Bulletin of geography. Socio–economic series



Yüklə 2,63 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/7
tarix18.07.2018
ölçüsü2,63 Mb.
#56193
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7


ISSN 1732–4254 quarterly

journal homepages:

http://www.bulletinofgeography.umk.pl/

http://wydawnictwoumk.pl/czasopisma/index.php/BGSS/index

http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/bog

BULLETIN OF GEOGRAPHY. SOCIO–ECONOMIC SERIES

© 2016 Nicolaus Copernicus University. All rights reserved.

© 2016 De Gruyter Open (on-line).

DE

G

Bulletin of Geography. Socio–economic Series / No. 31 (2016): 145–160

Approximating actual flows in physical infrastructure networks: 

the case of the Yangtze River Delta high-speed railway network

Weiyang Zhang

1, CDFMR


Ben Derudder

2, CMR


Jianghao Wang

3, D


Frank Witlox

4, C


1,2,4

Ghent University, Department of Geography, Krijgslaan 281-S8, 9000 Ghent, Belgium; 

1

phone: +32 486 537 776, e-mail: weiyang.



zhang@ugent.be; 

2

phone: + 32 92 644 556, e-mail: ben.derudder@ugent.be (corresponding author); 



4

phone: + 32 92 644 553, e-mail: 

frank.witlox@ugent.be; 

3

Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Information System, 



Institute of Geographic Sciences & Natural Resources Research, Datun road 11 A, Chaoyang district, 100101 Beijing, China; phone: 

+ 8 601 064 888 018, e-mail: wangjh@lreis.ac.cn

How to cite:

Zhang W., Derudder B., Wang J., Witlox F., 2016: Approximating actual flows in physical infrastructure networks: the case of the 

Yangtze River Delta high-speed railway network. In: Szymańska, D. and Rogatka, K. editors, Bulletin of Geography. Socio-econom-

ic Series, No. 31, Toruń: Nicolaus Copernicus University, pp. 145–160. DOI: 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/bog-2016-0010

Abstract. Previous empirical research on urban networks has used data on infra-

structure networks to guesstimate actual inter-city flows. However, with the ex-

ception of recent research on airline networks in the context of the world city 

literature, relatively limited attention has been paid to the degree to which the 

outline of these infrastructure networks reflects the actual flows they undergird. 

This study presents a method to improve our estimation of urban interaction in 

and through infrastructure networks by focusing on the example of passenger 

railways, which is arguably a key potential data source in research on urban net-

works in metropolitan regions. We first review common biases when using infra-

structure networks to approximate actual inter-city flows, after which we present 

an alternative approach that draws on research on operational train scheduling. 

This research has shown that ‘dwell time’ at train stations reflects the length of 

the alighting and boarding process, and we use this insight to estimate actual in-

teraction through the application of a bimodal network projection function. We 

apply our method to the high-speed railway (HSR) network within the Yangtze 

River Delta (YRD) region, discuss the difference between our modelled network 

and the original network, and evaluate its validity through a systemic compari-

son with a benchmark dataset of actual passenger flows.



Contents:

1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  146

2.  Methods for measuring inter-city interactions through railway networks  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  148

Article details:

Received: 01 December 2015

Revised: 22 December 2015

Accepted: 29 January 2016



Key words:

railway networks,

passenger flows,

dwell time,

high-speed railway,

Yangtze River Delta.

© 2016 Nicolaus Copernicus University. All rights reserved.

 - 10.1515/bog-2016-0010

Downloaded from De Gruyter Online at 09/23/2016 11:26:34AM

via Universiteit Antwerpen




W. Zhang, B. Derudder, J. Wang, F. Witlox  / Bulletin of Geography. Socio-economic Series / 31 (2016): 145–160

146


  2.1. Interaction potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  148

  2.2. A proxy based on infrastructure volumes  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  149

3.  An alternative approach to approximating passenger flows in railway networks  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  149

  3.1. Dwell time  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  149

  3.2. Approximating passenger flows between city-pairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  150

4.  Approximating the flows of high-speed railway (HSR) passengers within the Yangtze River Delta  151

  4.1. Case region, data and transformed network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  151

  4.2. Comparison between the original network generated by the proxy of the number of daily 

trains and the transformed network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  153

5.  A benchmark test using the data on Weibo users’ inter-city movements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  156

6. Conclusion  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  157

Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  158

References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  158

1. Introduction

In his groundbreaking book on ‘the rise of the net-

work society’, Castells (1996: 377) examines the new 

spatial logic emerging from the ‘complexity of the 

interaction between technology, society, and space’. 

This new spatial logic, which Castells famously terms 

‘the space of flows’, has three layers: the electron-

ic impulses in networks, the places which consti-

tute the nodes and hubs of the different networks, 

and the spatial organization of people in terms of 

their work, play, and movement. The first layer pro-

vides the material support for the network society

i.e. it is the ‘technological infrastructure of informa-

tion systems, telecommunications and transportation 

lines’ (1999: 295) that reflects, determines, supports, 

and/or enables the network society. Although Cas-

tells’ book focuses on the information age and the 

electronic time-sharing practices through space this 

has brought about, his research can be envisaged as 

part of a wider metageographical shift emphasizing 

the importance of ‘networks’ in the organization of 

space. For instance, in urban geography we have seen 

a shift towards ‘urban networks’ as a major analytical 

lens which can understand ‘urban systems’ (e.g. Mei-

jers, 2007; Camagni, Salone, 1993; Zhao et al., 2014).

Based on this general premise, we have seen the 

emergence of a rich empirical literature on the posi-

tion of cities in networks at different scales, ranging 

from ‘world city networks’ at the global scale (e.g. 

Taylor, Derudder, 2015) to urban networks that con-

stitute polycentric metropolitan regions (e.g. Burg-

er et al., 2014). The former literature highlights—in 

spite of its rich diversity—the role of major cities at 

the crossroads of multiple networks. For instance, 

when cast in terms of Castells’ three-layered struc-

ture, the airline networks studied by Smith and Tim-

berlake (2001) and Zook and Brunn (2006) can be 

understood as analyses of a key infrastructural net-

work (the first layer) centered on world cities (the 

second layer) in order to facilitate the movement 

of capital, people, and information (the third lay-

er). Similar observations can be made with respect 

to analyses of Internet backbone networks (Ruther-

ford et al., 2004; Tranos, 2011), logistics networks 

(Ducruet, Notteboom, 2012; O’Connor, 2010), of-

fice networks of firms (Rozenblat, 2010; Derudder 

et al., 2013), or a combination of infrastructures 

(Devriendt et al., 2010; Ducruet et al., 2011).

In strict terms, infrastructure can be thought 

of as the basic physical and organizational struc-

tures and facilities (e.g. ports, buildings, roads, pow-

er supplies) needed for the operation of individual 

organizations and enterprises and/or society and 

the economy at large. However, infrastructure net-

works merely provide a material basis for tangible 

flows; they do not cover these tangible flows as 

such. A good example would be the analysis of 

urban networks through the lens of air traffic 

networks (Derudder, Witlox, 2005; Neal, 2014): 

although data on air traffic networks are wide-

ly used in urban network research (Matsumoto, 

2004; Smith, Timberlake, 2001), in most cases data 

 - 10.1515/bog-2016-0010

Downloaded from De Gruyter Online at 09/23/2016 11:26:34AM

via Universiteit Antwerpen



Yüklə 2,63 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2023
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə